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Old 03-24-2018, 12:46 PM
 
7,746 posts, read 4,595,731 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kyle19125 View Post
The Philly example is for 502 square feet, and a unique example known as a trinity which are very narrow, not very deep, and primarily vertical rowhomes. The NYC and DC examples are quite the exception and in areas most wouldn't want to live in early on in the gentrification process. Chicago is the outlier and you'll notice not mentioned in my prior post...so your point being?
Actually, the Philly example is 1000 sq feet, fairly standard for a 2br.

I could find you dozens of comparable examples in Philly, including detached homes. That part of NYC is pretty far along in it’s gentrification, and I could find plenty of similar apartments in other safe neighborhoods (although they’d mostly be in Queens or the Bronx).
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Old 03-24-2018, 12:50 PM
 
Location: Pittsburgh
3,145 posts, read 2,835,875 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gladhands View Post
Youíll forgive bluecarebear. He/she hasnít come to terms with the fact that Pittsburgh is no longer a hollowed shell of a city where turnkey properties cost 80k anymore. He/she is also of the false impression that underemployed college grads are a Pittsburgh-specific phenomenon.

I am of the belief that 300k still gets you a decent house or condo in most cities, and 200k can get the job done in Pittsburgh.

https://www.redfin.com/PA/Pittsburgh...m_content=link

https://www.redfin.com/PA/Pittsburgh...m_content=link
Why? A family can buy a newer house outside of Allegheny county for the same amount or less and get a garage, yard, better school district, safer neighborhood, and pay less taxes. I have seen brand new townhomes advertised for under 200K in the burbs. Census numbers tell the truth. Baby Boomers and Millennials want new and suburban.
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Old 03-24-2018, 12:51 PM
 
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This might be too complex an issue if your mind works in yes/no binary terms.
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Old 03-24-2018, 01:18 PM
 
11,456 posts, read 6,619,064 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kyle19125 View Post
The Philly example is for 502 square feet, and a unique example known as a trinity which are very narrow, not very deep, and primarily vertical rowhomes. The NYC and DC examples are quite the exception and in areas most wouldn't want to live in early on in the gentrification process. Chicago is the outlier and you'll notice not mentioned in my prior post...so your point being?
Now you're nitpicking. What do you mean most wouldn't want to live there? If an apartment in Harlem is that expensive, then clearly there is a demand to live there.
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Old 03-24-2018, 01:33 PM
 
7,746 posts, read 4,595,731 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bluecarebear View Post
Why? A family can buy a newer house outside of Allegheny county for the same amount or less and get a garage, yard, better school district, safer neighborhood, and pay less taxes. I have seen brand new townhomes advertised for under 200K in the burbs. Census numbers tell the truth. Baby Boomers and Millennials want new and suburban.
The census numbers tell us that the parts of the metro that lie outside of Allegheny County are seeing high percentages of population loss. Desirability as a relative term, but it seems as if more people in the area would rather be in or near the city.
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Old 03-24-2018, 02:34 PM
 
1,837 posts, read 1,261,820 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mhays25 View Post
Good post Pine to Vine. I'm not allowed to rep you.

A $1,200 rent and $500 in car expenses in Houston isn't more affordable than a $1,600 rent and $100 transit pass in an urban city. And you get to live in the urban city!

Articles like this take advantage of a misconception...nobody ever claimed that ALL millennials like cities. It's just more than previous generations. It's still more. But they find the ones that don't like cities and talk about them, including the trend of some of the mid-low income types going elsewhere for cost reasons.
Where in Houston are you paying that much in rent for a one bedroom or studio? Especially in a part of Houston where a car is required; I live comfortably without a car in suburban DFW, which is often compared to Houston. I'm not as familiar with Houston but I can't imagine an "average" apartment being more than in DFW.
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Old 03-24-2018, 09:54 PM
 
Location: Tempe, AZ
4,552 posts, read 3,660,529 times
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I live in car-centric Phoenix metro.

I pay $630/month with a roommate, have $500/month in car expenses if I factor in insurance, gas, and car payment (not including estimated maintenance).

In hindsight if I did not have to pay $500/month for the car, does that mean I would put that money all towards rent for the urban apartment? If I pay that $1200/month for a one bedroom, I still couldn't afford the urban one bedrooms, I'd get a studio at best in Phoenix at 400-600 square feet. I could afford the two bedroom suburban apartment I live in now by myself, but then I'd need the car, so I'm back to square one.

Urbanity is expensive because of NIMBYs and over 50 years of urban neglect. Over the course of said 60 years or so developers have been underdeveloping, and we are seeing those effects today. Severely restrictive zoning is making only luxury apartment profitable, and that's the only ones being built because of it.

If we didn't have white flight and significant suburbanization for basically three generations and the urban centers of our major cities were much more affordable due to more housing stock, I guarantee that more people would pick the urban car-free lifestyle (let's be honest cars aren't cheap) than the suburbs. It's just that in the United States it has been the suburbs and only the suburbs, suburbs are the only ones being subsidized, etc. that's where all the housing stock is, and many just don't have the choice and are being priced out of urban areas by the wealthy. It shouldn't have to be that way.
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Old 03-24-2018, 11:55 PM
 
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Putting my numbers out there, I pay under five hundred dollars a month with my partner, who also pays the same amount, for a one bedroom apartment in a safe part of suburban DFW, the price including all utilities and internet, and then four hundred for an annual (~thirty three monthly) regional transit pass. The pass would be sixteen hundred anually or one thirty three monthly if I was not a student. I would spend less if I wanted because I work within walking distance and there are plenty of restaurants and three grocery stores within walking distance (as well as my dentist and doctor) but I just like having an annual pass.

Now, question, what safe, urban, and walkable setting in the US could my partner and I live in for less than six hundred dollars a month each? And that is for one bedroom housing and transportation, which we each currently pay about five hundred for (just under six hundred if I had to pay full price for transit pass). If anywhere, probably a much smaller and less diverse metro/city in the Midwest.
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Old 03-25-2018, 12:08 AM
 
Location: Atlanta
5,314 posts, read 3,529,118 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Parhe View Post
Putting my numbers out there, I pay under five hundred dollars a month with my partner, who also pays the same amount, for a one bedroom apartment in a safe part of suburban DFW, the price including all utilities and internet, and then four hundred for an annual (~thirty three monthly) regional transit pass. The pass would be sixteen hundred anually or one thirty three monthly if I was not a student. I would spend less if I wanted because I work within walking distance and there are plenty of restaurants and three grocery stores within walking distance (as well as my dentist and doctor) but I just like having an annual pass.

Now, question, what safe, urban, and walkable setting in the US could my partner and I live in for less than six hundred dollars a month each? And that is for one bedroom housing and transportation, which we each currently pay about five hundred for (just under six hundred if I had to pay full price for transit pass). If anywhere, probably a much smaller and less diverse metro/city in the Midwest.
Yeah, that would be a very tall order! Congrats to you guys for being able to pull this off.

If you don't mind, what part of the Metroplex are you in - and do you enjoy living there?
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Old 03-25-2018, 05:58 AM
 
5,643 posts, read 6,112,484 times
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I think it depends on the city and education that can make a huge difference in the income.

Most top 5 cities are super expensive to live in. If you have a marketable skill and drive to make it happen then top rated urban neighborhoods like Lincoln Park (Chicago) or Back Bay (Boston) may work.

If you're not making top dollars in specialized fields, big cities are not usually worth the money and the hassle. You can either move to the suburbs or less gentrified neighborhoods or downscale your city.
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