U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S.
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
 
 
Old 03-26-2018, 05:29 PM
 
Location: Future Expat of California
602 posts, read 326,143 times
Reputation: 538

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by ajams22 View Post
I'm hoping this further encourages LA to grow vertically.
Depends on if the City wants it.
Quick reply to this message

 
Old 03-26-2018, 05:53 PM
 
Location: Future Expat of California
602 posts, read 326,143 times
Reputation: 538
One thing to keep in mind is that alot of the 'maxed out' cities like SF, LA, Miami, NYC, etc. are all very desirable to a large amount of people so they will in a sense always be 'maxed out'.

The cities that have 'endless amount of room' are not desirable by a large amount of the population hence why they have an 'endless amount of room'.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-26-2018, 07:18 PM
 
4,478 posts, read 2,659,202 times
Reputation: 4083
Quote:
Originally Posted by Texamichiforniasota View Post
The San Gabriel Mountains are just "hills really?" They max out at over 10,000 feet. Where is there similar land to the San Gabriels that has been developed?
Oh no, the most extreme interpretation of what I wrote is debatable!

Think about it. There are hills where sprawl isn't allowed. Obviously. Maybe that's what I meant.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-26-2018, 09:45 PM
 
1,185 posts, read 873,374 times
Reputation: 1847
Quote:
Originally Posted by mhays25 View Post
Oh no, the most extreme interpretation of what I wrote is debatable!

Think about it. There are hills where sprawl isn't allowed. Obviously. Maybe that's what I meant.
So there is some parkland that isn't allowed to be developed. That doesn't mean that LA isn't geographically constrained. If that was the case, Manhattan isn't constrained because Central Park could be developed into over 200 city blocks. The hills aren't even what constrain the LA Metro, in any case. It's the mountain ranges and ocean. The hilly areas that are preserved are almost all surrounded on all sides by development (Look at Griffith Park, the Puente Hills, Simi Hills etc). What blocks LA from growing geographically is the Pacific to the West and South, Camp Pendleton to the South East, the Santa Ana, Peninsular Range, and San Jacinto Mountains to the East, the San Gabriel Mountains to the North, and the Santa Monica Mountains to the West down to the Pacific.

Also, a lot of the hilly areas were preserved because they weren't good areas to develop, instead of not being developed because they were preserved. Long after the surrounding flats were built up, those areas were still undeveloped, and the owners sold them or donated them to the government for parks, since they couldn't profitably be built up. There are still many empty lots in the Hollywood Hills, that are privately owned and could technically be developed , but many never will be. The same is true in many hilly areas in the LA Metro. The geology is complicated in the hills; they exist as a result of the plates rubbing against each other. Faults, landslides, fire dangers, and complicated drainage patterns are all issues in the hills. Most of the somewhat flat and reasonably easy to develop lots were built up many years ago. Most of what is left has steep slopes, and require complicated and very expensive soil studies, drainage development, and massive retaining walls to develop. It can cost $1-$2 million just to get the lot to a point where it's able to have a 1200 sqft house built on it. It's not that there is wide open streches of land out there that could be built up but us being held back by parks. Its that marginal land that was difficult to profitably develop was instead turned into parks and preserves.

The edges of the metro are hemmed in by the above named mountain ranges and the Pacific Ocean. Once you cross to the other side of those mountains, there is plenty of open land, but you are looking at s 2+ hour one way commute to areas with a significant number of well paid jobs. It takes at least an hour to get over or around the mountains, and then another hour sitting in suburban traffic gridlock to get to job centers.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-26-2018, 09:55 PM
 
4,478 posts, read 2,659,202 times
Reputation: 4083
Of course it's constrained topographically. But it also protects developable land.

Other metros are much more stark in terms of preserving land that would otherwise be mowed over...Seattle, Portland, Vancouver, San Francisco, etc.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-28-2018, 02:43 PM
 
Location: New Orleans
34 posts, read 51,279 times
Reputation: 34
New Orleans can be added to the "constrained" list as the city proper is hemmed in by bodies of water (the river and the lake) and already surrounded by fairly dense suburbs on the south shore. There is room for expansion on the north shore but it's all the way across the lake.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-28-2018, 03:04 PM
 
Location: Brew City
4,213 posts, read 2,499,142 times
Reputation: 5646
Quote:
Originally Posted by bus man View Post
Pretty much any Midwestern city can expand in any direction, because there's nothing but flat agricultural land all around them.

In the case of some cities, the impediment to growth is political, not geographic. For example, Baltimore is constrained by land-use restrictions to the north (Baltimore County north of Cockeysville) and to the west (Howard County west of Clarksville). Add in the Chesapeake Bay to the east and the Washington metro area to the south, and one could say that Baltimore is maxed out, or at least close to it.
Now what is that wet place I can walk to a few blocks away? Oh right, Lake Michigan. Blocking both Milwaukee and Chicago to the East. Lake Erie blocks Cleveland to the north, Buffalo to the west, and Toledo to the north/east. Lake St. Claire, Lake Erie, and Canada are blocking Detroit on the east and south.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-28-2018, 07:04 PM
 
Location: South Padre Island, TX
2,452 posts, read 1,277,280 times
Reputation: 1386
It was always said that Houston had endless room for growth. Then all that land got in a bit of a splash last August...

Last edited by Texyn; 03-28-2018 at 07:50 PM..
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-30-2018, 08:40 AM
 
Location: Clemson, SC by way of Tyler,TX
4,843 posts, read 2,973,256 times
Reputation: 3391
Quote:
Originally Posted by Peasy973 View Post
One thing to keep in mind is that alot of the 'maxed out' cities like SF, LA, Miami, NYC, etc. are all very desirable to a large amount of people so they will in a sense always be 'maxed out'.

The cities that have 'endless amount of room' are not desirable by a large amount of the population hence why they have an 'endless amount of room'.
I've always hoped that the COL in California would go down one day so that I can get a house there. If that happens, some smart rich guys will probably just buy up all the homes.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-30-2018, 09:10 AM
 
Location: Brooklyn the best borough in NYC!
1,991 posts, read 863,506 times
Reputation: 1106
NYC has no room to expand! Rezoning and making use of air rights and more vertical building will only help us.

Same for DC and San Fran I could imagine!
Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


 
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:
Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S.
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top