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Old 03-26-2018, 02:23 PM
 
Location: Cleveland, OH
1,251 posts, read 642,759 times
Reputation: 745

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Quote:
Originally Posted by jfre81 View Post
It's more a function of those cities having fewer opportunities that attract outsiders. Not the lack of outsiders making it where there aren't those opportunities.

And when we discuss those places, we're talking about places like Detroit that, in the 1950s, were chock full of "transplants." Their kids are now "natives."

In almost every Rust Belt metro there are people who were born and raised there, and even their parents were born and raised there, but if you go back to the early 20th century there's often someone who came from Kentucky or Alabama to work in a factory.
But, a lot of people and the media give so much negative press to Rust Belt (I hate them term) cities for their local culture.
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Old 03-26-2018, 02:30 PM
 
Location: Avondale, Chicago
14,423 posts, read 26,261,562 times
Reputation: 9460
Quote:
Originally Posted by QCongress83216 View Post
But, a lot of people and the media give so much negative press to Rust Belt (I hate them term) cities for their local culture.
It's not a flattering description, but when local leadership wants to cling to the idea that the factories are going to come back to life and revitalize the city, there aren't much better ways to put it. Cleveland's made some great strides in the last decade.

If I could find a place and the means to pay for it there, I'd move to Pittsburgh like, yesterday.
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Old 03-26-2018, 03:17 PM
 
1,706 posts, read 1,370,952 times
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Yeah, it's bad because transplants bring new attitudes, new dynamics, new politics, new skills, etc. Without transplants, an area becomes stagnant and lacks growth, innovation, etc. I mean, look at some of the cities that have lost jobs, lost major employers, those cities are exhibit A on the importance of transplants and growth.
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Old 03-26-2018, 03:38 PM
 
1,987 posts, read 1,242,159 times
Reputation: 2222
Quote:
Originally Posted by NOVA_guy View Post
Yeah, it's bad because transplants bring new attitudes, new dynamics, new politics, new skills, etc. Without transplants, an area becomes stagnant and lacks growth, innovation, etc. I mean, look at some of the cities that have lost jobs, lost major employers, those cities are exhibit A on the importance of transplants and growth.
Yes, but there needs to be a balancing act. Fast growth can cause a lot of displacement issues and stress on current infrastructure. You also wouldn't want to have a city that is so transient to the point of having a big revolving door.
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Old 03-26-2018, 05:20 PM
 
7,279 posts, read 13,538,196 times
Reputation: 3610
Quote:
Originally Posted by QCongress83216 View Post
IMO, I feel that most people feel that if you city doesn't have millions of transplants, it's a s****y city and nothing can't be great about it. It just seems like most Americans make it a bad thing especially if it's not overcrowded and expensive.
Who's "most people"? So what if a handful of turds from the NYC/LAs and Austin/Portlands of the world throw a little shade? I think there are a fair number of people out there who are really starting to come around on more affordable small-to-medium-sized cities. That's part of the reason some of the current hipster hotspots got where they are. They offered more affordable and approachable alternatives to the largest cities/metros.

I've lived in tiny towns and giant cities, and I'm definitely on board with medium-sized cities with some amenities but sustainable growth. I also have a soft spot for the Clevelands and Detroits and Buffalos and Milwaukees and Pittsburghs out there.
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Old 03-26-2018, 06:48 PM
 
908 posts, read 915,613 times
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if a city doesn't have a lot of transplants that usually means it doesn't have anything that people are attracted to.
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Old 03-26-2018, 09:00 PM
 
Location: Cleveland, OH
1,251 posts, read 642,759 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 908Boi View Post
if a city doesn't have a lot of transplants that usually means it doesn't have anything that people are attracted to.
But, is it a good thing, a bad thing or just indifferent?
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Old 03-27-2018, 08:32 AM
 
3,664 posts, read 1,546,642 times
Reputation: 3064
It can be good and it can be bad, depending on how the transplants approach their new area. I think most who complain about new residents say many who come flee problems in their previous area (like high COL), only to come to the new area and vote/influence policies that create the very problems they just ran from. Another thing is mocking or degrading local culture. If the culture is so mock-worthy, why would you move there? Why put down culture/beliefs that's not your own in someone else's backyard? Respect is the key. Very good thread!
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Old 03-27-2018, 08:51 AM
 
2,517 posts, read 2,280,503 times
Reputation: 1855
It all depends on the quality of transients you receive. I'll use DC for example since it's my home and arguably one of the most transient places. Most of the transients to the area are at least college educated and will have a decent job with a decent salary. This helps to increase the tax base and as we can see DC is a much more prosperous and livable place today then it ever has been with crime rates going down and previously run down areas seeing a resurgence etc. Of course there are negative aspects but overall - looking at it from outside in, the city has become so much better! I remember when you couldn't even go past Logan Circle and now the area is a premiere neighborhood.
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Old 03-27-2018, 09:12 AM
 
Location: Mars City
5,091 posts, read 2,153,937 times
Reputation: 7505
Nothing wrong one way or another. Some cities have historically been bland and can benefit from some "transplanting" and cultural development. Other cities have traditional richness with their own variations of people, and don't necessarily benefit from transplants coming in.

There's no automatic good/bad or pro/con response. It depends on the area.
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