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Old 03-28-2018, 08:19 AM
 
Location: Brooklyn the best borough in NYC!
1,991 posts, read 863,506 times
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Photos show the extreme lengths millennials will go to live in cities - Business Insider

What do you make of this article? As a black man I would say that living in suburbs is actually still popular but I do also notice the rest of America’s young people seem to enjoy the cities more!
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Old 03-28-2018, 12:26 PM
 
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"The reason they call it the American Dream is because you have to be asleep to believe it." George Carlin
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Old 03-28-2018, 12:44 PM
 
Location: 352
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These people are in an extreme minority. The vast majority of people are not actively trying to live in a van or share a house with 30 people. Millennials are giving the suburbs a chance and census trends prove that. NY and SF are also in a league of their own when it comes to expense, that article makes it look like living in a shipping container is a millennial craze that everyone is doing.
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Old 03-28-2018, 12:46 PM
 
2,013 posts, read 1,011,832 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BrooklynJo View Post
Photos show the extreme lengths millennials will go to live in cities - Business Insider

What do you make of this article? As a black man I would say that living in suburbs is actually still popular but I do also notice the rest of America’s young people seem to enjoy the cities more!
Young people always enjoy the city more. When they begin to have families, though, suburbia becomes more popular.
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Old 03-28-2018, 12:49 PM
 
Location: Brooklyn the best borough in NYC!
1,991 posts, read 863,506 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Enean View Post
Young people always enjoy the city more. When they begin to have families, though, suburbia becomes more popular.
The family part is a Fact indeed!
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Old 03-28-2018, 12:51 PM
 
769 posts, read 710,370 times
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I would say the article/photos seem to be even more illustrative of the Bay Area's affordability crisis, and the lengths some people will go to in order to live there - it's likely more problematic for young people who don't have a lot of money.

Maybe when more millenials start having kids/settling down, the suburbs will experience a boom. But for those without kids/single, cities tend to offer a lot more fun things to do. I happen to be more of a city dweller type myself that fits the latter demographic - different strokes for different folks!
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Old 03-28-2018, 01:21 PM
 
Location: New York City
5,705 posts, read 5,098,562 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jandrew5 View Post
These people are in an extreme minority. The vast majority of people are not actively trying to live in a van or share a house with 30 people. Millennials are giving the suburbs a chance and census trends prove that. NY and SF are also in a league of their own when it comes to expense, that article makes it look like living in a shipping container is a millennial craze that everyone is doing.
That sad part is, now millions of ignorant Americans will lump all Millennials into that category.

There have been people that fit into that extreme minority status since the beginning of civilization, this does not seem like anything new to me.
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Old 03-28-2018, 01:26 PM
 
Location: Willowbend/Houston
13,403 posts, read 21,182,398 times
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I take issue with the title of the thread. The American dream isnt dead. You just have to realize that some cities are more expensive than others and adjust your life accordingly. The American dream doesnt say that we can live anywhere we want comfortably. We have choices to make. Studio apartment in San Francisco or you can go buy a house in Kansas. Not every place is going to cost the same so we have to choose the path best for us.

Im just barely old enough to not be a millennial and I never considered NYC, SF, or Vancouver for those very reasons. At some point, you just have to look at the cost/benefit analysis of any place and how much you need to leave reasonably somewhere.

I grew up in the suburbs of LA and didnt really think Id leave. But when my parents sold their house and move to Texas, it was sink or swim. I realized I could afford way more and get good jobs with less competition in Texas (of course this was circa 2010). So I left. It just wasnt worth it anymore.

Unless I have a job that pays 300k, I wouldnt darken the door of SF or NYC to live. I wouldnt go back to LA for less than 250k.
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Old 03-28-2018, 02:43 PM
 
Location: USA
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People been saying this for years...the American dream has been dead since we've been walking away from accepting immigrants who support entrepreneurship and agreeing to not accepting a safety net if they fail.
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Old 03-29-2018, 12:40 AM
 
Location: 352
5,122 posts, read 3,878,001 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cpomp View Post
That sad part is, now millions of ignorant Americans will lump all Millennials into that category. There have been people that fit into that extreme minority status since the beginning of civilization, this does not seem like anything new to me.
Exactly. There are gen Xers in San Fran who are still living with multiple roommates. Boomers were living in hippie communes at one point. It's always an extreme minority, but articles like try to craft it as "see these millenials, this is what they all do now."
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