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Old 03-28-2018, 11:38 AM
 
Location: ATLANTA
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Our Great US Cities with Black Female Mayors! Black Women seem to be on the rise lately leading some of our Countries most Prosperous Cities. Atlanta's Keisha Bottoms, New Orleans Latoya Cantrell, and Charlotte's Vi Lyles. Could our Great City of Nashville be next in line??? Nashville Councilwoman Erica Gilmore just announced she will be running for Mayor of (Music City) Nashville this year in a special election replacing Mayor Barry.. This is Awesome news






Almost Complete List of Black Women Mayors




https://patch.com/tennessee/nashvill...es-mayoral-bid

Last edited by oobanks; 03-28-2018 at 12:03 PM..
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Old 03-28-2018, 01:24 PM
 
Location: BMORE!
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Baltimore's last 3 Mayor's have been black women.
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Old 03-28-2018, 01:25 PM
 
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Can't forget DC mayor Muriel Bowser.
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Old 03-28-2018, 01:31 PM
 
Location: ATLANTA
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I'm wondering if Erica Gilmore will get this in Nashville. It will be interesting to see what happens and how this plays out!
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Old 03-29-2018, 09:50 PM
 
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LaMetta Wynn was the mayor of Clinton, Iowa - population 30,000 - elected as a female black mayor for 12 years during the 1990's and 2000's. The city was only 2% black at the time and 95% white.

Iowa is notable for electing the first female mayor of any kind back in 1922 in Iowa City. This was only 3 years after women won the right to even vote in an election in the country.

Iowa has a noticeable history of black mayors recently:

1997: Iowa's largest city with 200,000 elects a black mayor for a total of seven years. The city is 8% black at the time.

2006: Iowa City, the state's third largest city elects a black mayor, the city itself is 4% black.

2014: Burlington, Iowa, population 25,000, elects black mayor, the city is 85% white.

2016: Waterloo Iowa, at the time the fourth largest city with 70,000 elects its first black mayor.
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Old 03-29-2018, 11:30 PM
 
Location: New York NY
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An interesting case:
San Francisco had a black woman, London Breed, as mayor for about a month earlier this year, after the city’s first Chinese-American mayor unexpectedly died in office. She succeeded him as next in line because she was city council president (or whatever they call that in SF). But the other council members didn’t want her to hold office right before this year’s election. So they voted her out and installed a white guy.

I understand that she is running in that election anyhow and may be elected anyway in her own right. Or maybe not. Maybe someone here more knowledgeable about SF politics can fill in the blanks.

Last edited by citylove101; 03-29-2018 at 11:44 PM..
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Old 03-30-2018, 07:21 AM
 
56,511 posts, read 80,803,243 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Chicago60614 View Post
LaMetta Wynn was the mayor of Clinton, Iowa - population 30,000 - elected as a female black mayor for 12 years during the 1990's and 2000's. The city was only 2% black at the time and 95% white.

Iowa is notable for electing the first female mayor of any kind back in 1922 in Iowa City. This was only 3 years after women won the right to even vote in an election in the country.

Iowa has a noticeable history of black mayors recently:

1997: Iowa's largest city with 200,000 elects a black mayor for a total of seven years. The city is 8% black at the time.

2006: Iowa City, the state's third largest city elects a black mayor, the city itself is 4% black.

2014: Burlington, Iowa, population 25,000, elects black mayor, the city is 85% white.

2016: Waterloo Iowa, at the time the fourth largest city with 70,000 elects its first black mayor.
Waterloo in comparison isn't as big of a surprise, as the city is a substantial 16-17% black and has a attracted black migrants from Mississippi for decades.
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Old 03-30-2018, 08:02 AM
 
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^ but still with 5 out of 6 people being white it's hardly a head-on match if you're just looking at race.

I was actually surprised, I knew my hometown of Iowa City had a black mayor even though it was just a few % black, but I wasn't entirely aware that the capital Des Moines and Burlington of all places also did.

And to get lilly white Clinton with a female black mayor back in the 1990's.

I'm sorry to see the progressive tolerant stance of the state fall so quickly over the past 5-8 years.

Iowa had a lot of firsts:

1839 - Territorial Supreme Court: man could not be sent back into slavery "re: Ralph," WL 2764, at *6 (Iowa Terr. July 1839) "no man in this territory can be reduced to slavery." (US - 1865 after Civil War)

1851 – Iowa General Assembly: removed ban on inter-racial marriage (1967 US)

1851 – Iowa "Code of 1851:" gave married women property rights

1855 - The University of Iowa opened its doors as the first state university in America to admit men and women on an equal basis.

1857 - Iowa Constitution included African-Americans 'same rights' as every citizen

1867 – Iowa Supreme Court: broke with 'common law' that men would get absolute custody of children in divorce; "Cole v Cole"

1868 - Iowa Supreme Court: school desegregation case -- a 12-year-old girl could not be barred from a Muscatine school on basis of race

1869 - Iowa Supreme Court: Arabella Mansfield could not be barred from practicing law due to gender. She became the first female lawyer in US.

1873 – Iowa Supreme Court: Emma Coger, mixed race woman, could not be denied eating privileges in steam boat 'whites only' dining room.

1875 – Historic First: Emma Haddock, first female lawyer to practice in US Federal courts

1879 - When federal supreme court refused to change laws which stated "white male" as a requirement to practice law, the Iowa General Assembly came together and voted to strike the words.

1879 - Law alumnus G. Alexander Clark is believed to be the first African American in the nation to earn a law degree.

1884 – Iowa General Assembly: civil rights law enacted (racial)

1884 – Historic First: Jennie McCowen, first US woman medical graduate (U.I.)

1905 - What would later become the NAACP was established in Iowa.

1920 – Historic First: (Iowa General Assembly?) When women got the vote, Iowa also made them eligible for jury service (most states still didn't allow this for a decade or more)

1923 - Iowa City elects the country's first female mayor of any city larger than 10,000 people.

1924 -- Native Americans given right to vote.

1934 - First mosque in North America built in Iowa.

1965 –1969 US Supreme Court - Tinker v. Des Moines Independent School District: Freedom of speech includes black arm bands protesting the war in Vietnam.

1970 – Iowa General Assembly: no-fault divorce (one of first in nation laws)

1971 – Adel High School's (anti) Long Hair rule at school is unconstitutional (district court) Boys can wear their hair long.

1976 - Iowa Supreme Court: sodomy laws violate "equal protection" clause (Legislation: Iowa struck down all sodomy laws in 1978; US in 2003)

Last edited by Chicago60614; 03-30-2018 at 08:11 AM..
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Old 03-30-2018, 08:30 AM
 
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Some very interesting information about Iowa...good stuff.
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Old 04-02-2018, 08:30 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by oobanks View Post
I'm wondering if Erica Gilmore will get this in Nashville. It will be interesting to see what happens and how this plays out!
Erica Gilmore is not the only black female running for mayor of Nashville. Dr. Carol Swain, a retired law professor from Vanderbilt, is also running.

https://www.tennessean.com/story/new...yor/480035002/
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Last edited by JMT; 04-03-2018 at 06:53 AM..
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