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Old 03-28-2018, 12:19 PM
 
Location: Killeen, Tx
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I know that Maryland and Delaware used to be considered southern but at what point did they lose that identity and transition to where they are currently (northern/mid Atlantic)?
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Old 03-28-2018, 01:17 PM
 
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I don't think Delaware was ever truly considered Southern except by the US Census Bureau. Before the Revolution, it was considered a Middle Colony with PA, NJ, and NY. It has early ties to PA and when the Mason-Dixon Line was expanded from the PA-MD border, it was extended down along the MD-DE border to define DE on the side of the North. Though, it has Southern culture, I have often seen Delaware in books and articles referred to as Northeastern.
Maryland, on the other hand, was considered a Southern Colony before the Revolution along with VA, NC, SC, and GA. It was very much a part of the Old South, even though it was a border state during the Civil War. I think Maryland started being considered Northern by many people in more recent years because of its location in the BOS-WASH corridor and more liberal politics. Most native Marylanders that I have met consider themselves to be Southerners and from the South.
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Old 03-28-2018, 01:19 PM
 
Location: BMORE!
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I can speak for the Baltimore area and the Eastern shore, but the culture remains intact, as there weren't tons of transplants from other regions coming in a diluting the culture. The Baltimore region and the Eastern Shore are still very much southern.
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Old 03-28-2018, 01:48 PM
 
Location: ATLANTA
2,148 posts, read 1,440,287 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Kemba View Post
I don't think Delaware was ever truly considered Southern except by the US Census Bureau. Before the Revolution, it was considered a Middle Colony with PA, NJ, and NY. It has early ties to PA and when the Mason-Dixon Line was expanded from the PA-MD border, it was extended down along the MD-DE border to define DE on the side of the North. Though, it has Southern culture, I have often seen Delaware in books and articles referred to as Northeastern.
Maryland, on the other hand, was considered a Southern Colony before the Revolution along with VA, NC, SC, and GA. It was very much a part of the Old South, even though it was a border state during the Civil War. I think Maryland started being considered Northern by many people in more recent years because of its location in the BOS-WASH corridor and more liberal politics. Most native Marylanders that I have met consider themselves to be Southerners and from the South.


This is so true, especially when it comes to Delaware.. I have never know Delaware to consider it's self the true south. Maybe more Mid Atlantic to Northeastern... The State of Delaware has far more relations and in common with things Philly and South Jersey than anything south especially New Castle and now more so Kent Counties.
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Old 03-31-2018, 08:59 PM
 
358 posts, read 151,783 times
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Baltimore has little bits of Southern influence (as I'd argue even Philly does, being from that),but overall it is decidedly mid-Atlantid and not Southern. Delaware is not really southern except for maybe Sussex County (i.e., Kent and New Castle Counties are not).
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Old 04-01-2018, 01:25 AM
 
Location: Alexandria, Commonwealth of Virginia
1,609 posts, read 1,113,414 times
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1940-1970 for Maryland. That's when you saw massive growth due to the booming Federal Government hit its stride:

Population Change 1940-1970:

Anne Arundel County (Baltimore MSA): 68,375 -> 297,539
Baltimore County (Baltimore MSA): 155,825 -> 621,077
Montgomery County (Washington MSA): 83,912 -> 522,809
Prince George's County (Washington MSA): 89,490 -> 660,567

Those 4 counties alone went from 397,000 to 2,103,000 in the span of 30 years.

In 1940 Maryland had 1,821,244 people. By 1970 it had grown to 3,922,399, more than doubling. It gained 1.6 million people alone from 1950-1970. That's 80,000 per year for 20 years straight on average. Those are fast growing "Sun Belt" numbers even today. Considering the U.S. had half the population in 1960 than it has today, however, that 80,000 would be in per capita terms the same as a state gaining 160,000 people per year today.

In other words, Maryland changed completely in that 30 year time period.

Of course, Maryland has residual Southern culture in the Eastern Shore and small nuggets of Southern Maryland. On the whole, however, it is a Mid-Atlantic state through and through. Much closer to New Jersey and Pennsylvania than to South Carolina and Georgia in culture.
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Old 04-02-2018, 07:28 AM
 
Location: ATLANTA
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Originally Posted by NDFan View Post
Baltimore has little bits of Southern influence (as I'd argue even Philly does, being from that),but overall it is decidedly mid-Atlantid and not Southern. Delaware is not really southern except for maybe Sussex County (i.e., Kent and New Castle Counties are not).

Agreed!
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Old 04-02-2018, 07:41 AM
 
Location: Center City
6,869 posts, read 7,823,193 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NDFan View Post
Baltimore has little bits of Southern influence (as I'd argue even Philly does, being from that),but overall it is decidedly mid-Atlantid and not Southern. Delaware is not really southern except for maybe Sussex County (i.e., Kent and New Castle Counties are not).
Eastern Sussex County is a mid-Atlantic ocean resort. The rest of the county is more rural than southern (people often conflate time two). The same is true of MDís lower Eastern Shore - rural, not southern. Delamarva becomes southern once you cross the state line into Virginia. Itís as if a switch has been flipped.
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Old 04-02-2018, 08:16 AM
 
Location: Baltimore - Richmond
505 posts, read 334,066 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Pine to Vine View Post
Eastern Sussex County is a mid-Atlantic ocean resort. The rest of the county is more rural than southern (people often conflate time two). The same is true of MD’s lower Eastern Shore - rural, not southern. Delamarva becomes southern once you cross the state line into Virginia. It’s as if a switch has been flipped.
LOL. That is not true at all. A lot of people in these areas, at least on the MD/VA portion, are families that live/fish/hunt/Go to the doctor/Shop on both sides. For all intents and purposes, they are the same people. Similar to Dahlgren, VA/Newburg, MD, along 301. On a map or on city data it looks/sounds different, but for people living in these communities...that imaginary VA/MD line doesn't mean much. Neither VA or MD's eastern shore is overly southern, in the stereotypical way...they kinda are just their own thing. Their own accents, their own traditions etc. What's the difference between someone from Smith Island, MD and someone from Tangier Island, VA?
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Old 04-02-2018, 08:25 AM
 
Location: Center City
6,869 posts, read 7,823,193 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mpier015 View Post
LOL. That is not true at all. A lot of people in these areas, at least on the MD/VA portion, are families that live/fish/hunt/Go to the doctor/Shop on both sides. For all intents and purposes, they are the same people. Similar to Dahlgren, VA/Newburg, MD, along 301. On a map or on city data it looks/sounds different, but for people living in these communities...that imaginary VA/MD line doesn't mean much. Neither VA or MD's eastern shore is overly southern, in the stereotypical way...they kinda are just their own thing. Their own accents, their own traditions etc.
Since weíre only expressing opinions, youíre entitled to yours. Iíve lived in Delaware, Maryland and Virginia and I disagree.
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