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Old 04-01-2018, 11:05 AM
 
1,059 posts, read 467,512 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Duderino View Post
Good list, although Philadelphia, DC, Miami and Chicago really belong in the "best" tier according to Walk Score. I'd also argue that your assertion about "high value" versus "low road" economies is a corollary of walkability, not necessarily a cause of it. A distinct difference in my book.

Walkability is most predicated upon the history of the built environment (i.e., how much of it predated the mass consumption of automobiles) and population density.

Seattle and Miami both are interesting "in between" cases (certainly a very strong and continuously strengthening urban cores that are solidly above all other large US cities but not quite as "well-rounded" as the "Big 6" (NYC, SF, Boston, Philly, Chicago and DC), which are the quintessential traditionally-urban big cities.
Seattle is notably better than Miami in terms of overall walkability - this is born out by the fact that Seattle has one of the highest walking commute mode shares and Miami isnít even close. Seattle also beats Miami in transit share by a lot - and transit riders are often pedestrians as well. I agree itís not up there with the big 6, but I think itís better than Miami.
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Old 04-01-2018, 12:31 PM
 
4,697 posts, read 2,858,744 times
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Census Dept. 2016 ACS commute share numbers for the core cities....

Seattle: 20.8% transit, 10.1% walk, 3.8% bike.
Miami: 11.3% transit, 4.2% walk, 1.0% bike (low despite tiny city limits).
Chicago: 27.8% transit, 6.7% walk, 1.6% bike (high despite huge city limits).

I bring up these numbers a lot, but they keep coming in handy!
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Old 04-01-2018, 12:45 PM
 
Location: The City
22,355 posts, read 32,554,791 times
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am surprised Chicago doesn't have a larger bike share, its flat as a pancake




For Miami also remember that its unbearably hot to walk 6 months a year, not saying its more walkable than either Seattle or Chicago


Seattle has a good core (sans some hills) but smaller and drops off rapidly, is gorgeous terrain though


Miami has more areas with flat and somewhat walkable its hot and it doesn't have great street activation, plus far more of just a pure car mentality


Areas of Miami can be great to walk in but its just not the main way nor will it likely ever be




Seattle is more like a SD or LA in terms of its walkability (the latter two don't get the credit of Seattle though Seattle has the best probably 10x10 DT or so for walking (obviously not the only area to walk))


Other places like Charleston, NOLA, many smaller older cities, Baltimore and Pittsburgh can be very walkable as well




Places to me are difficult to walk given their size


Austin, DFW, Houston (esp outside of the core its left to mostly strips and in Austin's case hardly even that), Phoenix (heat also factors), Vegas (don't tell me the strip), Jax, Atlanta (if you get more than blocks off of Peachtree it seems anywhere in the city among larger and more discussed cities




Places like Cleveland, Cinci, Detroit seem to be somewhere in between albeit could argue more like a Seattle than a Houston etc.


Chicago is by far the biggest outlier on walkability in the MW among larger cities
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Old 04-01-2018, 01:21 PM
 
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Seattle's average density isn't that high (8,390/sm per the 2016 Census estimate), but HOW it's dense is a factor. It's not spread around evenly, it's clustered in transit-served districts. Buses are the transit foundation, but it's a better bus system than most cities, with decent frequencies and lots of HOV lanes.

Culture and policy are also key. The massive amount of apartment construction nearly always comes with fewer parking spaces than units, and often comes with zero parking. That's essential to keeping costs and rents down. It's also a reaction to people skipping car ownership. Employers over a certain size are required by the State to create commute plans and reduce SOV usage. So many like mine give everyone free transit passes, or even give bonuses to people that don't use parking. Offices in the CBD have an upper limit of one parking space per 1,000 sf, or about 5 workers. Yet still office towers sprout like weeds, such as Amazon's core towers (they end up around 1 per 7 workers in that 1,000 sf) and others, some with far less parking than allowed. Even Microsoft's suburban main campus has something like a 60% SOV commute rate. The result is a ton of white collar people including six-figure earners that take transit, walk, or bike to work.
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Old 04-01-2018, 03:17 PM
 
3,541 posts, read 1,722,492 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kidphilly View Post
am surprised Chicago doesn't have a larger bike share, its flat as a pancake

For Miami also remember that its unbearably hot to walk 6 months a year, not saying its more walkable than either Seattle or Chicago

Seattle has a good core (sans some hills) but smaller and drops off rapidly, is gorgeous terrain though

Miami has more areas with flat and somewhat walkable its hot and it doesn't have great street activation, plus far more of just a pure car mentality

Areas of Miami can be great to walk in but its just not the main way nor will it likely ever be

Seattle is more like a SD or LA in terms of its walkability (the latter two don't get the credit of Seattle though Seattle has the best probably 10x10 DT or so for walking (obviously not the only area to walk))

Other places like Charleston, NOLA, many smaller older cities, Baltimore and Pittsburgh can be very walkable as well

Places to me are difficult to walk given their size

Austin, DFW, Houston (esp outside of the core its left to mostly strips and in Austin's case hardly even that), Phoenix (heat also factors), Vegas (don't tell me the strip), Jax, Atlanta (if you get more than blocks off of Peachtree it seems anywhere in the city among larger and more discussed cities

Places like Cleveland, Cinci, Detroit seem to be somewhere in between albeit could argue more like a Seattle than a Houston etc.

Chicago is by far the biggest outlier on walkability in the MW among larger cities
Most bike friendly cities.
https://www.thrillist.com/travel/nat...ties-in-the-us

Chicago tops NYC as most bike-friendly city in U.S., magazine finds - Chicago Tribune in 2016.

- Magazine editor-in-chief Bill Strickland said Chicago grabbed the top spot because it has emphasized building infrastructure that separates cyclists from motorists.
- Chicago's on-street bike network covers 245 miles, plus there are 47 miles of off-street bike trails, such as The 606.
- San Francisco was ranked second-best bike city, followed by Portland, Ore.; New York City; and Seattle. Minneapolis; Austin, Texas; Cambridge, Mass.; Washington, D.C.; and Boulder, Colo., rounded out the top 10.

Bringing bike-share to Chicago's transit deserts - Chicago Tribune

Chicago's Divvy bike share is owned by the city and docking stations.

In 2016, the city’s Divvy program chalked up an operational loss of $1.75 million. The city’s share of that loss was $752,000. Chicago’s contract with Motivate calls for the city to share Divvy profits — and losses — with the company.

And yet, the program’s popularity continues to grow. There were 3.8 million Divvy trips in the city as of mid-December 2017, compared to 3.5 million in 2016 and 2.4 million in 2014. The city’s decision to expand Divvy into neighborhoods in the South and West sides has played a major role in the shortfall where poorer neighborhoods have less ridership still.

The City of Chicago’s on-street bike network consists of over 225 miles of barrier protected bike lanes, buffer protected bike lanes, conventional bike lanes, marked shared lanes and neighborhood bike routes. The network of bike facilities is growing every year.

Bikeways – Chicago Complete Streets

bike lanes are guided by the Streets for "Cycling Plan 2020", a plan to build a continuous network of 645 miles of on-street bikeways throughout Chicago. The overall system consists of three smaller systems: Neighborhood Bike Routes that utilize residential streets, Crosstown Bike Routes that use collector and arterial roadways, and Spoke Routes that connect all corners of the City to Downtown.

Depending on the year counted ... Chicago's bike lanes keep rising. The city besides flat as a pancake LOL. Has a bit wider street-grid including downtown (then some Eastern cities). To put separate bike lanes in easier. The "Loop Link" bike lanes have appeared there. With improving bike paths along the lakefront separating Bike and jogging lanes with a overpass in phases under construction for better connection from Ohio St beach to across the Chicago river near Navy Pier.

Navy Pier "Flyover bike and pedestrian bridge project" phase two underway.

https://chicago.curbed.com/2017/10/9...o-construction

- phase two to extend a dedicated jogging and biking trail south over the Odgen Slip and DuSable Park.
- the third and final phase of the project will replace perhaps the single most treacherous stretch of the Lakefront Trail with a dedicated path above the Chicago River. Currently, joggers and cyclists must cross the waterway along the sidewalk of Lower Lake Shore Drive.

The flyover will go from the beach on the right to across
the river on the left for better and safer connectivity with
the whole lakefront of paths for bikers and joggers.

Last edited by DavePa; 03-10-2019 at 08:07 PM..
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Old 04-01-2018, 03:40 PM
 
Location: SoCal
3,812 posts, read 2,662,036 times
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L.A. doesn't get a lot of recognition for its walkability, but I live 15 miles west of DTLA, and I literally can walk to everything!! The beach is 6 blocks away, I have 13 restaurants in a two block radius, my job is a minute walk from my house, there are many parks in a one mile radius, not to mention an entire upscale outdoor mall less than a mile away, there's the train a half mile away that connects to just about anywhere generally in LA county, also the beautiful Santa Monica pier is a half mile away. I love when people come visit! IfI was to ever take the bus there is non stop service.
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Old 04-01-2018, 03:55 PM
 
Location: Chi > DC > Reno > SEA
1,792 posts, read 842,846 times
Reputation: 2236
DC is plenty walkable from what I've seen so far, as good as Chicago. If anything, I think biking is iffier here: lots of major streets have no parking and 2-3 lanes on each side, so cars will whiz by the edge of the pavement at 40 mph+. It can be intimidating or downright unsafe to cycle on them. This is especially pronounced in the inner suburbs - compare to Chicago, where virtually all of Cook County except for the northwestern panhandle has been easily bikeable in my experience.
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Old 04-01-2018, 04:38 PM
 
1,059 posts, read 467,512 times
Reputation: 830
Quote:
Originally Posted by mhays25 View Post
Seattle's average density isn't that high (8,390/sm per the 2016 Census estimate), but HOW it's dense is a factor. It's not spread around evenly, it's clustered in transit-served districts. Buses are the transit foundation, but it's a better bus system than most cities, with decent frequencies and lots of HOV lanes.

Culture and policy are also key. The massive amount of apartment construction nearly always comes with fewer parking spaces than units, and often comes with zero parking. That's essential to keeping costs and rents down. It's also a reaction to people skipping car ownership. Employers over a certain size are required by the State to create commute plans and reduce SOV usage. So many like mine give everyone free transit passes, or even give bonuses to people that don't use parking. Offices in the CBD have an upper limit of one parking space per 1,000 sf, or about 5 workers. Yet still office towers sprout like weeds, such as Amazon's core towers (they end up around 1 per 7 workers in that 1,000 sf) and others, some with far less parking than allowed. Even Microsoft's suburban main campus has something like a 60% SOV commute rate. The result is a ton of white collar people including six-figure earners that take transit, walk, or bike to work.
And that uneven distribution of density is likely to become even more pronounced once the largely grade-separated light rail system is built out across the region. For many trips - particularly in the city and the Eastside - light rail will be faster and cheaper (considering parking costs) than driving.
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Old 04-01-2018, 05:03 PM
 
4,697 posts, read 2,858,744 times
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LA seems very walkable in a neighborhood sense. There are lots of places where you can live in a dense area with walkable retail.

Its commute share is very low however, for walking, transit, and bikes. Some of that is the dispersal of jobs and market sectors.
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Old 04-01-2018, 05:05 PM
 
4,697 posts, read 2,858,744 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Vincent_Adultman View Post
And that uneven distribution of density is likely to become even more pronounced once the largely grade-separated light rail system is built out across the region. For many trips - particularly in the city and the Eastside - light rail will be faster and cheaper (considering parking costs) than driving.
Agreed. The urban village concept (nodes) is booming throughout the region. Part of that is that every municipality is required to plan for growth, and generally the answer is a dense mixed use district or two, not upzoning the SFR areas.
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