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Old 04-01-2018, 07:26 PM
 
1,060 posts, read 468,075 times
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I donít think itís been mentioned yet but Portland is an excellent city for pedestrians. The NW and SW quadrants in particular really feel like they were built for people over cars. And there are pedestrian-oriented corridors throughout the city. My main problem with Portland is that it can feel a bit one-dimensional, but thatís really besides the point in this discussion. In terms of being good for pedestrians, I think Portland is underrated on this board. Same goes for Pittsburgh.
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Old 04-01-2018, 07:53 PM
 
Location: South Park, San Diego
5,071 posts, read 7,768,291 times
Reputation: 9531
Quote:
Originally Posted by ClemVegas View Post
Greenville SC is great for pedestrians. Some people say it is similar to an European city.
Greenville looks like a fabulous city. A couple of days ago I got a fb post about a cool hipster couple visiting Greenville (I have no idea why) but it was enough for me to delve a little bit on my own to explore the city online. It does look like one of the very few cities in the south I would ever consider living in, but from my peripheral exploration it seems to have just about everything I value highly in a city, walk ability and a friendly vibrant urban scene with nature and topography interwoven into and near the city chiefly among them.

I will say that my brief online dipping my toe included checking on RE prices and it is anything but a cheap Southern sunbelt city. A house similar to mine- vintage architectural house walking distance to downtown and a vibrant village neighborhood- is only a bit cheaper than my ridiculously overvalued million dollar cottage here- and no Pacific Ocean 12 minutes out the door. It is a place now on my short list to visit soon however.
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Old 04-01-2018, 08:17 PM
Status: "Fall is Here!" (set 12 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
87,657 posts, read 103,822,260 times
Reputation: 33463
Quote:
Originally Posted by kidphilly View Post
am surprised Chicago doesn't have a larger bike share, its flat as a pancake




For Miami also remember that its unbearably hot to walk 6 months a year, not saying its more walkable than either Seattle or Chicago


Seattle has a good core (sans some hills) but smaller and drops off rapidly, is gorgeous terrain though


Miami has more areas with flat and somewhat walkable its hot and it doesn't have great street activation, plus far more of just a pure car mentality


Areas of Miami can be great to walk in but its just not the main way nor will it likely ever be




Seattle is more like a SD or LA in terms of its walkability (the latter two don't get the credit of Seattle though Seattle has the best probably 10x10 DT or so for walking (obviously not the only area to walk))


Other places like Charleston, NOLA, many smaller older cities, Baltimore and Pittsburgh can be very walkable as well




Places to me are difficult to walk given their size


Austin, DFW, Houston (esp outside of the core its left to mostly strips and in Austin's case hardly even that), Phoenix (heat also factors), Vegas (don't tell me the strip), Jax, Atlanta (if you get more than blocks off of Peachtree it seems anywhere in the city among larger and more discussed cities




Places like Cleveland, Cinci, Detroit seem to be somewhere in between albeit could argue more like a Seattle than a Houston etc.


Chicago is by far the biggest outlier on walkability in the MW among larger cities
Weather sucks most of the year.

Denver is pretty walkable, and the weather is usually cooperative. Only a few days in winter and a few very hot days in summer that make walking uncomfortable.

Quote:
Originally Posted by DavePa View Post
Most bike friendly cities.
https://www.thrillist.com/travel/nat...ties-in-the-us

Chicago tops NYC as most bike-friendly city in U.S., magazine finds - Chicago Tribune in 2016.

- Magazine editor-in-chief Bill Strickland said Chicago grabbed the top spot because it has emphasized building infrastructure that separates cyclists from motorists.
- Chicago's on-street bike network covers 245 miles, plus there are 47 miles of off-street bike trails, such as The 606.
- San Francisco was ranked second-best bike city, followed by Portland, Ore.; New York City; and Seattle. Minneapolis; Austin, Texas; Cambridge, Mass.; Washington, D.C.; and Boulder, Colo., rounded out the top 10.

Bringing bike-share to Chicago's transit deserts - Chicago Tribune

Chicago's Divvy bike share is owned by the city and docking stations.

In 2016, the cityís Divvy program chalked up an operational loss of $1.75 million. The cityís share of that loss was $752,000. Chicagoís contract with Motivate calls for the city to share Divvy profits ó and losses ó with the company.

And yet, the programís popularity continues to grow. There were 3.8 million Divvy trips in the city as of mid-December 2017, compared to 3.5 million in 2016 and 2.4 million in 2014. The cityís decision to expand Divvy into neighborhoods in the South and West sides has played a major role in the shortfall where poorer neighborhoods have less ridership still.

The City of Chicagoís on-street bike network consists of over 225 miles of barrier protected bike lanes, buffer protected bike lanes, conventional bike lanes, marked shared lanes and neighborhood bike routes. The network of bike facilities is growing every year.

Bikeways Ė Chicago Complete Streets

bike lanes are guided by the Streets for "Cycling Plan 2020", a plan to build a continuous network of 645 miles of on-street bikeways throughout Chicago. The overall system consists of three smaller systems: Neighborhood Bike Routes that utilize residential streets, Crosstown Bike Routes that use collector and arterial roadways, and Spoke Routes that connect all corners of the City to Downtown.

Depending on the year counted ... Chicago's bike lanes keep rising. The city besides flat as a pancake LOL. Has a bit wider street-grid including downtown (then some Eastern cities). To put separate bike lanes in easier. The "Loop Link" bike lanes have appeared there. With improving bike paths along the lakefront separating Bike and jogging lanes with a overpass in phases under construction for better connection from Ohio St beach to across the Chicago river near Navy Pier.

Navy Pier "Flyover bike and pedestrian bridge project" phase two underway.

https://chicago.curbed.com/2017/10/9...o-construction

- phase two to extend a dedicated jogging and biking trail south over the Odgen Slip and DuSable Park.
- the third and final phase of the project will replace perhaps the single most treacherous stretch of the Lakefront Trail with a dedicated path above the Chicago River. Currently, joggers and cyclists must cross the waterway along the sidewalk of Lower Lake Shore Drive.

The flyover will go from the beach on the right to across
the river on the left for better and safer connectivity with
the whole lakefront of paths for bikers and joggers.
That just shows that those lists don't mean much.
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Old 04-01-2018, 09:20 PM
 
3,543 posts, read 1,724,361 times
Reputation: 2594
Quote:
Originally Posted by Katarina Witt View Post
Weather sucks most of the year.

Denver is pretty walkable, and the weather is usually cooperative. Only a few days in winter and a few very hot days in summer that make walking uncomfortable.

That just shows that those lists don't mean much.
You can dislike Chicago and post show it as you may... This isn't Denver vs. Chicago either. But it isn't fake news in despite Chicago's issues. It earned esteem it still gets. Links giving it high marks to wins are legit in criteria they go by.

I don't think weather in Denver is any kind of boasting point over Chicago's as if Denver winters are much more comfortable .... Lake Michigan actually cools the shore neighborhoods and lakefront in summer vs inland and suburbs too. But not a thread on weather. That really is a shallow boasting point. Chicago is in every top 5 list (most) of walkable cities and biking. That has little to do with having winters now does it... (well biking yes). As it is built environment for waking and what a city does and builds to promote more offerings for jogging and biking.

Last edited by DavePa; 04-01-2018 at 09:33 PM..
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Old 04-01-2018, 11:16 PM
Status: "Fall is Here!" (set 12 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
87,657 posts, read 103,822,260 times
Reputation: 33463
Quote:
Originally Posted by DavePa View Post
You can dislike Chicago and post show it as you may... This isn't Denver vs. Chicago either. But it isn't fake news in despite Chicago's issues. It earned esteem it still gets. Links giving it high marks to wins are legit in criteria they go by.

I don't think weather in Denver is any kind of boasting point over Chicago's as if Denver winters are much more comfortable .... Lake Michigan actually cools the shore neighborhoods and lakefront in summer vs inland and suburbs too. But not a thread on weather. That really is a shallow boasting point. Chicago is in every top 5 list (most) of walkable cities and biking. That has little to do with having winters now does it... (well biking yes). As it is built environment for waking and what a city does and builds to promote more offerings for jogging and biking.
The one who's making this Denver vs Chicago is you, not me. I was responding to a poster who said "am surprised Chicago doesn't have a larger bike share, its flat as a pancake" by saying Chicago's weather sucks most of the year, meaning for biking. Cold, windy, often snowy in winter; hot and humid in summer, not much in between.

Then I went on to say that Denver is fairly walkable, a different topic altogether, having nothing to do with biking in Chicago.

I find these innumerable "lists" kind of silly; it all depends on what metrics are used. If biking lists just kept to biking it'd be one thing, but they talk about number of bike stores and all sorts of miscellany as well, meaning stats can be manipulated to show what the author wants shown.
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Old 04-02-2018, 07:04 AM
 
3,543 posts, read 1,724,361 times
Reputation: 2594
Quote:
Originally Posted by Katarina Witt View Post
The one who's making this Denver vs Chicago is you, not me. I was responding to a poster who said "am surprised Chicago doesn't have a larger bike share, its flat as a pancake" by saying Chicago's weather sucks most of the year, meaning for biking. Cold, windy, often snowy in winter; hot and humid in summer, not much in between.

Then I went on to say that Denver is fairly walkable, a different topic altogether, having nothing to do with biking in Chicago.

I find these innumerable "lists" kind of silly; it all depends on what metrics are used. If biking lists just kept to biking it'd be one thing, but they talk about number of bike stores and all sorts of miscellany as well, meaning stats can be manipulated to show what the author wants shown.
I never mentioned Denver in my Chicago comments till I replied to yours boasting of a superior climate of some kind ... .

Stats are valid and what LITERALLY a city is doing and building are valid. Links that acknowledged this with rating cities in walkability and biking etc. Clearly, have merit as the criteria is given. Again.... no link I posted can be accused of fake fabricated news.

If you do not like a city boasted on in the thread for whatever reason? Boast of your favorites and why nd links of what it has achieved and building. No trying to deny another that HAS BUILT the infrastructure getting high marks for.

To continue this will get us accused of bickering. So I'm done replying on my boast of one city in my post.
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Old 04-02-2018, 08:05 AM
 
11,226 posts, read 22,628,570 times
Reputation: 11021
Quote:
Originally Posted by Katarina Witt View Post
Weather sucks most of the year.

Denver is pretty walkable, and the weather is usually cooperative. Only a few days in winter and a few very hot days in summer that make walking uncomfortable.
Weather sucks most of the year? A majority of the year sees highs above 55 degrees, around 7 months. That's very easy for biking, and even during the middle of winter you get tons of days up in the 40's where I see people everywhere biking to work.

What really keeps people away is freezing weather and snowfall.

On average there is snow of some sort on the ground for 12% of the days of the year in Chicago. There's more than 3" of snow on the ground on for 6% of the year.

On average 33% of the days of the year drop to freezing in Chicago. 14% of days get down to 20 degrees and 6% of days get down to 10 degrees. On average a little under 12% of the days fail to reach freezing. 4% of days get above 90 degrees.

It's great bike riding weather around 6-7 months of the year. Doable outside that between being too hot or more commonly too cold.

I would say walking has always been good in the city, but biking is where there's been an overwhelming visual transformation in the city in the past 10 years. Hundreds of miles of protected bike lanes built everywhere, traffic signals now that include bike lanes with lights for bikers, and the bike sharing program Divvy is now getting over 20,000 riders per day during the summer on multiple occasions.
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Old 04-02-2018, 08:11 AM
Status: "Fall is Here!" (set 12 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
87,657 posts, read 103,822,260 times
Reputation: 33463
Quote:
Originally Posted by DavePa View Post
I never mentioned Denver in my Chicago comments till I replied to yours boasting of a superior climate of some kind ... .

Stats are valid and what LITERALLY a city is doing and building are valid. Links that acknowledged this with rating cities in walkability and biking etc. Clearly, have merit as the criteria is given. Again.... no link I posted can be accused of fake fabricated news.

If you do not like a city boasted on in the thread for whatever reason? Boast of your favorites and why nd links of what it has achieved and building. No trying to deny another that HAS BUILT the infrastructure getting high marks for.

To continue this will get us accused of bickering. So I'm done replying on my boast of one city in my post.
You can roll your eyes all the way back into your head, but I certainly did not "boast" as you claim.

Funny you're holding ME responsbile for "bickering" as you are the one making such a mountain out of my molehill of a comment.
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Old 04-04-2018, 08:09 AM
 
1,843 posts, read 3,493,160 times
Reputation: 2193
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Duderino View Post
I'd also argue that your assertion about "high value" versus "low road" economies is a corollary of walkability, not necessarily a cause of it. A distinct difference in my book.
There may be a causal relationship in one way or the other. Some legacy cities remain very walkable because their economies have proven to be resilient. Many others have become less walkable as thereís less to walk to and from after decades of hollowing-out. If the core of a legacy city grows again with more of everything being built there then of course it becomes more walkable. Itís the Ďhigh-roadí economies that demonstrate a demand for central locations which in turns begets a more walkable environment. There may be some causality in the other direction too. Why do some cities develop or attract high-road investment? Lots of reasons but one could be the the built environment itself that people find attractive. San Francisco seems a prime example to me, where the built environment created decades ago plus beautiful setting and favorable climate make the city and region an overwhelming favorite for high road firms. Part of the housing cost dilemma now in SF, as well as in Boston and maybe other places is caused by so many people wanting to preserve the aesthetic quality of the historic environment which leads to building and height restrictions.
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Old 04-04-2018, 08:31 AM
 
Location: Willowbend/Houston
13,403 posts, read 21,481,700 times
Reputation: 10319
Quote:
Originally Posted by DavePa View Post
You can dislike Chicago and post show it as you may... This isn't Denver vs. Chicago either. But it isn't fake news in despite Chicago's issues. It earned esteem it still gets. Links giving it high marks to wins are legit in criteria they go by.

I don't think weather in Denver is any kind of boasting point over Chicago's as if Denver winters are much more comfortable .... Lake Michigan actually cools the shore neighborhoods and lakefront in summer vs inland and suburbs too. But not a thread on weather. That really is a shallow boasting point. Chicago is in every top 5 list (most) of walkable cities and biking. That has little to do with having winters now does it... (well biking yes). As it is built environment for waking and what a city does and builds to promote more offerings for jogging and biking.
I call BS on that 2nd paragraph. Denver is much more comfortable in the winter than Chicago and yes I have lived in Chicago and spent ample time in Denver in all seasons.
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