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Old 04-02-2018, 02:58 PM
 
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Both have the advantages of weather, business-focused economy, and no personal state income tax.

Both states have large Latino populations, which tend to have larger families that stay relatively close to each other, so that's a logical reason as well.

FL is obviously a huge retirement state, but I know just as many people who retire to TX and AZ that retire to FL. TX seems to have a less extreme climate especially if you're further out west. Drier than FL too, for people that like that.
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Old 04-02-2018, 06:01 PM
 
Location: Wonderland
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Quote:
Originally Posted by projectmaximus View Post
Warm weather and no state income tax are two major draws for retirees and older citizens. Business-friendly environments have helped bring a lot of jobs.
Texas is one of the youngest states in the nation when it comes to the median age of residents. It's ranked #4 out of 50 states.

The Youngest and Oldest States in America: Map | Time

No state income tax is more beneficial typically to younger folks, not older folks. Most people make more money while they're working than when they are retired.
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Old 04-02-2018, 06:03 PM
 
Location: Wonderland
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Originally Posted by MrJester View Post
The population is ageing, and as people age, they grow more conservative. TX and FL are red states, the Northeast is ultra-liberal. Also, the Northeast is seeing more snowmaggedon from climate change, and while TX and FL may receive increasing numbers of hurricanes, still, blizzards are even more miserable than hurricanes.
See above post - Texas has one of the youngest median ages in the US. Florida has one of the oldest. So I guess if conservatism is what draws people to Texas, then there are more young conservatives out there than some people realize.

(Actually I don't think that's why people are moving to Texas.)
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Old 04-02-2018, 07:21 PM
 
Location: Clemson, SC by way of Tyler,TX
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Not one mention of COL
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Old 04-02-2018, 08:22 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sean1the1 View Post
If you consider that Florida has the most senior citizens I'm sure it would have the highest death rate, so for it to be growing at a fast rate is unbelievable.

That means more people have to move in to account for the deaths, and people moving out.
FL draws huge #s of retirees, but it also draws huge #s of immigrants, largely from cultures which have high birth rates.
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Old 04-02-2018, 08:25 PM
 
Location: Wonderland
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Originally Posted by Ben Around View Post
FL draws huge #s of retirees, but it also draws huge #s of immigrants, largely from cultures which have high birth rates.
And yet Florida has one of the lowest birth rates among the states. Texas has a higher than average birth rate. Texas is ranked #4 and Florida is ranked #44.

CDC: States With Highest Birth Rates - Business Insider
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Old 04-03-2018, 06:49 AM
 
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Corporate America always steered where people moved to and still do as jobs are key. But milder winters also are a big decision choice for Northerners and totally in the case of retirees.

Once Northern cities had corporate evolving America steer Southern migration north. It is in reverse now with Air-Conditioning standard and a shift by Corporate America to lower taxing states. But they are increasing too so in time the scales will equalize more.

Too much housing isn't built to last though.... like how Texas cities virtually level older ranch-homes that humidity certainly wasn't kind to and rather then remodel them .... they were of low quality and leveled. How well newer housing will hold up we shall see.....
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Old 04-03-2018, 06:50 AM
 
Location: Pittsburgh, PA (Morningside)
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Originally Posted by KathrynAragon View Post
And yet Florida has one of the lowest birth rates among the states. Texas has a higher than average birth rate. Texas is ranked #4 and Florida is ranked #44.

CDC: States With Highest Birth Rates - Business Insider
Yeah, as I said, Florida and Texas are growing for different reasons. Both of them are "firing on all engines" insofar as they have more births than deaths, robust immigration, and positive domestic migration. However, the mix is a bit different.

Really though, they get more exposure than they should, just because they are geographically large states which have large populations and a lot of metropolitan areas. In the south, the Carolinas and Tennessee are growing robustly. Out west Washington, Oregon, Nevada, Arizona, etc all show big percentage increases.
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Old 04-03-2018, 08:42 AM
 
Location: Miami-Jax
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Quote:
Originally Posted by KathrynAragon View Post
Texas is one of the youngest states in the nation when it comes to the median age of residents. It's ranked #4 out of 50 states.

The Youngest and Oldest States in America: Map | Time

No state income tax is more beneficial typically to younger folks, not older folks. Most people make more money while they're working than when they are retired.
You are correct. To be fair, you missed the spirit of my post which was saying the same thing as you. I referenced the huge job growth, which realistically has much more of an effect on young workers than the zero income tax. Warm weather and no income tax seemingly has been a focal point for many retirees and older workers on a fixed income.
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Old 04-03-2018, 09:50 AM
 
Location: Wonderland
44,682 posts, read 36,118,702 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by projectmaximus View Post
You are correct. To be fair, you missed the spirit of my post which was saying the same thing as you. I referenced the huge job growth, which realistically has much more of an effect on young workers than the zero income tax. Warm weather and no income tax seemingly has been a focal point for many retirees and older workers on a fixed income.
Yes, but your first sentence was this:

Quote:
Warm weather and no state income tax are two major draws for retirees and older citizens.
No state income tax makes the biggest difference to people in the work force. Most retirees are living on a much lower income than they were when they were working. I've literally never heard a single person of retiree age say that they were moving to Texas or Florida because there's no state income tax. Actually, especially in Texas, that can be a bit problematic because while there is no state income tax, property taxes make up the difference in the coffers and they tend to move upward while income remains stagnant for retirees.

I think that's one reason why the median age in Texas is so youthful - while I love living in Texas and do plan to retire here, I don't have on rose colored glasses regarding property taxes and that potential challenge, which would not be as big an issue if we had a state income tax. Not that I want one - I enjoy not having one. But still - it's tricky, especially for retirees on a fixed income.
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