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Old 04-03-2018, 12:00 PM
 
1,702 posts, read 1,362,594 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by eschaton View Post
Traditionally speaking, Texas's growth has been driven by high birth rates and immigration, not domestic migration. Here are the latest figures for FL and TX:

Texas:
Born in state - 60.0%
Born in Northeast - 2.8%
Born in Midwest - 5.9%
Born elsewhere in South - 8.0%
Born in West - 5.2%
U.S. citizens - born outside U.S. - 1.4% (PR population negligible)
Foreign born - 16.7%

Because Texas is so big and has a growing economy, it does get a lot of domestic migrants. But it's growing from a large base, and doesn't (IIRC) even have a percentage growth due to domestic migrants in the top 10 today. It's largely high birth rates keeping Texas's population growth so robust.
Yikes.
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Old 04-03-2018, 12:20 PM
 
1,987 posts, read 1,234,516 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by eschaton View Post
Travis is where Austin is located, which is of course a big magnet for domestic migrants in Texas. It also has a not insubstantial immigrant population - both Latino and Asian, albeit smaller than Dallas or Harris.

In general, it seems like Bexar tends to pull more heavily than the rest of the state from the West Coast, Dallas from the South (those black professional migrants) Harris from the South and Northeast, and Tarrant and Travis from everywhere.
Where are you pulling this from and is it through 2018 or from 2010?
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Old 04-03-2018, 12:27 PM
 
Location: Pittsburgh, PA (Morningside)
12,414 posts, read 11,910,584 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DTXman34 View Post
Where are you pulling this from and is it through 2018 or from 2010?
American Factfinder. Estimates are only through to 2016 at the moment. Of course, given it tracks everyone by place of birth (even if you moved 40 years ago) they shouldn't change that rapidly from year to year.
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Old 04-03-2018, 12:37 PM
 
Location: Miami-Jax
6,308 posts, read 6,960,359 times
Reputation: 3496
Quote:
Originally Posted by KathrynAragon View Post
Yes, but your first sentence was this:



No state income tax makes the biggest difference to people in the work force. Most retirees are living on a much lower income than they were when they were working. I've literally never heard a single person of retiree age say that they were moving to Texas or Florida because there's no state income tax. Actually, especially in Texas, that can be a bit problematic because while there is no state income tax, property taxes make up the difference in the coffers and they tend to move upward while income remains stagnant for retirees.

I think that's one reason why the median age in Texas is so youthful - while I love living in Texas and do plan to retire here, I don't have on rose colored glasses regarding property taxes and that potential challenge, which would not be as big an issue if we had a state income tax. Not that I want one - I enjoy not having one. But still - it's tricky, especially for retirees on a fixed income.
Sorry to rebut you again, I realize this isn't an important discussion, particularly since we are in agreement. But two points: the sentence you quoted was a reference to elderly people, both retired and non, which technically (since you are being technical) would also include some of the highest income workers as well. Secondly, that first sentence in no way suggests that these things can't be important for young workers as well. I simply chose to stress the huge job growth. I feel like had I written 10 sentences instead of two it would have reflected your comments precisely. But because I chose to keep it simple (and admittedly less specific) it offended you. Sorry...I suppose those are the dangers of replying to the OPs basic question with a basic answer, rather than breaking it down.
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Old 04-03-2018, 12:42 PM
 
Location: Clemson, SC by way of Tyler,TX
4,839 posts, read 2,973,256 times
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California exports its poor to Texas, other states, while wealthier people move in | The Sacramento Bee


COL is a main driver it seems.

Friends in Texas suggested he relocate. He now works at a Walmart in Houston, making a little north of $10 an hour. He works 40 hours a week, riding his bike about 7 miles to work many days. He does not pay state income tax. His rent is just over $500, with utilities.

Last edited by Gaylord_Focker; 04-03-2018 at 12:55 PM..
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Old 04-03-2018, 12:49 PM
 
Location: Wonderland
44,651 posts, read 36,106,549 times
Reputation: 63178
Quote:
Originally Posted by projectmaximus View Post
Sorry to rebut you again, I realize this isn't an important discussion, particularly since we are in agreement. But two points: the sentence you quoted was a reference to elderly people, both retired and non, which technically (since you are being technical) would also include some of the highest income workers as well. Secondly, that first sentence in no way suggests that these things can't be important for young workers as well. I simply chose to stress the huge job growth. I feel like had I written 10 sentences instead of two it would have reflected your comments precisely. But because I chose to keep it simple (and admittedly less specific) it offended you. Sorry...I suppose those are the dangers of replying to the OPs basic question with a basic answer, rather than breaking it down.
Oh, I'm not offended at all. But thanks for expounding on the topic. I think it's an interesting one.
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Old 04-03-2018, 12:51 PM
 
Location: Pittsburgh, PA (Morningside)
12,414 posts, read 11,910,584 times
Reputation: 10533
Quote:
Originally Posted by projectmaximus View Post
Sorry to rebut you again, I realize this isn't an important discussion, particularly since we are in agreement. But two points: the sentence you quoted was a reference to elderly people, both retired and non, which technically (since you are being technical) would also include some of the highest income workers as well. Secondly, that first sentence in no way suggests that these things can't be important for young workers as well. I simply chose to stress the huge job growth. I feel like had I written 10 sentences instead of two it would have reflected your comments precisely. But because I chose to keep it simple (and admittedly less specific) it offended you. Sorry...I suppose those are the dangers of replying to the OPs basic question with a basic answer, rather than breaking it down.
Governing came out with this article last year detailing population growth from 2010-2016 by generation. Keep in mind that this includes growth due to immigration, and declines due to death (which are occurring at substantial numbers now for Boomers):

Highest growth states for each generation:

Millennials: DC, North Dakota, Colorado, Washington, Oregon, Texas, Florida, Nevada, Massachusetts, Arizona

Gen X: North Dakota, Florida, Texas, South Carolina, Colorado, Montana, Oregon, Washington, North Carolina, Idaho

Boomers: Florida, Arizona, Delaware, South Carolina, Nevada, Idaho (shrinking everywhere else due to death)

Silent/Older: Shrinking everywhere now. Even Arizona had an almost 19% decline.

Texas is not gaining older people. The number of boomers declined by 3.1% from 2010 to 2016. The gain is driven by Gen X and Millennials.
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Old 04-03-2018, 12:56 PM
 
Location: Northeast states
10,674 posts, read 8,179,948 times
Reputation: 2898
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gaylord_Focker View Post
California exports its poor to Texas, other states, while wealthier people move in | The Sacramento Bee


COL is a main driver it seems.

Friends in Texas suggested he relocate. He now works at a Walmart in Houston, making a little north of $10 an hour. He works 40 hours a week, riding his bike about 7 miles to work many days. He does not pay state income tax. His rent is just over $500, with utilities.
It rich people state
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Old 04-03-2018, 01:11 PM
 
Location: Greater Boston (Formerly Orlando and New York)
510 posts, read 196,859 times
Reputation: 498
My parents were transplants from MA... the reasons they and those around them moved were:

1. Weather
2. Job opportunities in Florida for certain industries are better for growth.
3. House Market ($500k, 1,800sqft home in a mediocre boston suburb built in 1978 vs $155k, 2300sqft home in a more affluent Orlando suburb next to Medical City in a gated community with 0 crime) Good investments.
4. Traffic (Commuiting from Suburban Boston to Boston was brutal.... going to the Plaza? Hell. Cape Cod? Omg Not on weekends)
5. Costs

OTHER REASONS
5. Diversity. Florida is extremely diverse population wise, nature wise and biodversity is great.
6. Ethnic Claves. Nyuricans are flocking to FL to plant their roots as it provides cheaper alternatives and more room for families to grow and additional family members to agglomerate and build a better community.
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Old 04-03-2018, 07:16 PM
 
17,649 posts, read 4,055,214 times
Reputation: 5586
Quote:
Originally Posted by eschaton View Post
You're right. I meant to type larger. It was a typo.
okay thats fine buddy.
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