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Old 11-17-2018, 01:06 AM
 
Location: SF, CA
1,518 posts, read 682,322 times
Reputation: 2366

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Quote:
Originally Posted by PosadasJ View Post
Hi Desert_SW_77 & majorsystemerror: OP here. While you are quite right that there are clear differences, topographically and vegetation-wise, between Northern New England and Southern New England, three different rules of mine required they be kept together:

(1) My rule of parsimony: I wanted no more than 20 regions, ideally 15, and a region couldn't be separately delineated if it's population wasn't approximately 1/20th of the whole US population. Northern New England clearly doesn't belong in Great Lakes, but it is too small population-wise to stand on its own.

(2) My rule of rural gravity: metro areas must be assigned to the same region as the adjacent rural areas for which they are hubs. All of the metros in Southern New England are the hubs for rural areas in Northern New England.

(3) My rule of local recognizability: The number of New Englanders who would have shared your concerns would be VASTLY drowned out by the number of New Englanders (both Northern and Southern NE) who would have howled had I put Boston/Providence/Hartford in with New York/Philly.
I'd suggest thinking twice about imposing such rules on your project, because there are parts of the US that are so distinctive that it doesn't make sense to toss them into larger regions.
Hawaii is very different from any other US state. So is Alaska. So is south Louisiana. Probably there are a few others as well.
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Old 11-17-2018, 06:18 AM
 
Location: Floribama
15,021 posts, read 31,391,658 times
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Appalachia doesn’t extend quiet that far south in AL, it’s really only a handful of counties in the northeast corner of the state. I wouldn’t put any of MS in that category at all.
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Old 11-17-2018, 07:57 AM
 
Location: Appalachian New York, Formerly Louisiana
4,099 posts, read 4,737,517 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by southernnaturelover View Post
Appalachia doesnít extend quiet that far south in AL, itís really only a handful of counties in the northeast corner of the state. I wouldnít put any of MS in that category at all.
I dunno, a little ways south of Birmingham is pretty much where it ends/begins in the south. Geologically the map is correct, and of course I personally define Appalachia by the mountains/hills themselves moreso than any cultural stereotypes.

When I used to travel northeast from Louisiana I always considered myself to have entered Appalachian country by the time I got east of Tuscaloosa.
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Old 11-17-2018, 09:14 AM
 
Location: Oklahoma
6,865 posts, read 6,194,424 times
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First I wanted to comment that my state (Oklahoma) is spot on given the parameters stated in the OP. However there is one thing I would like for the OP to consider regarding Oklahoma and Texas and I'd also like to here from Texans who are familiar with this area of Texas (again, based on the OP's parameters) .

The map has chosen to lump in what is known as "The Crosstimbers" (Level III Ecoregion #29) into Appohzarka. The map only includes the Oklahoma part of the "Crosstimbers" and I would say that is reasonably accurate. HOWEVER, it doesn't include the Texas part with the exception of the few counties along the Oklahoma border. In actuality the Cross Timbers extends through parts of DFW and on into areas west and southwest of Ft Worth. Cities like Stephenville, Brownwood and clear down to Brady are in this are which looks very much like the parts of the "Crosstimbers" of eastern Oklahoma.

Much like the hill country, this area is NOT part of the southern plains although it is adjacent to the area.
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