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Old 04-02-2018, 09:54 AM
 
3,963 posts, read 3,498,160 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DaveStavroz View Post
For me it were the following cities:

El Paso, TX - Almost 700,000 (thought it was a lot smaller)

Tucosn, AZ - 500,000 ( thought it was a lot smaller )

Orlando, FL - 270,000 ( thought it was a lot bigger).
When you look at their metro populations they look about the right size. Looking at city pop is meaningless.
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Old 04-02-2018, 10:39 AM
 
Location: Minneapolis
2,331 posts, read 3,057,613 times
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Metro population is the only meaningful number. City population is just random trivia.
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Old 04-02-2018, 10:48 AM
 
Location: crafton pa
979 posts, read 357,402 times
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Agreed. For example going by city proper population alone, you would have to conclude that the principal city in Florida is Jacksonville, not Miami.
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Old 04-02-2018, 10:59 AM
 
Location: SoCal
3,776 posts, read 2,564,713 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kyle19125 View Post
It's due to the weird MSA rules that seem to change case by case. Orlando's "metro area" is over 4000 square miles and includes coastal areas like Daytona Beach. An MSA is supposed to entail places where residents and commerce of those outlying areas are reliant on the main component city, which is very much not the case for Orlando.
Orlando's MSA doesn't include Daytona it only comprises of Orange, Lake, Osceola, and Seminole county winch makes sense when you look at most other MSA's that include outlandish examples.

I think Volusia should be included in the MSA though, anyone who has ever seen how many people commute into Volusia from Seminole should understand. The same case could be made for eastern Polk county, but the county would have to be divided between Orlando, and Tampa. I think in ten years the Tampa, and Orlando should comprise a larger CSA.
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Old 04-02-2018, 11:41 AM
 
1,236 posts, read 1,305,303 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MrJones17 View Post
Could not believe Columbus, OH was as large as it is.

Thought Atlanta's population would be a lot larger but I guess it's just because everyone lives in the nearby cities/towns/suburbs.
Is it really that surprising? Columbus is massive in terms of land area; it's over 215 sq miles. Cities like like Minneapolis (55 sq miles) and Atlanta (133 sq miles) are smaller in terms of land area and population, but feel and look much larger.
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Old 04-02-2018, 11:44 AM
 
Location: Avondale, Chicago
14,423 posts, read 26,255,947 times
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In El Paso's case, the metro population isn't much higher than that. As a MSA it's not even the largest on the Rio Grande in Texas - that would be McAllen-Edinburg-Mission aka the Rio Grande "Valley."
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Old 04-02-2018, 01:04 PM
 
Location: Arvada, CO
13,238 posts, read 24,446,503 times
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Metro Detroit.

Driving around there felt like driving across a place the size of Metro Phoenix (no, I've never looked at the actual numbers to compare the two).

I suppose I was a little surprised at how small Albuquerque is.
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Old 04-02-2018, 01:38 PM
 
311 posts, read 218,852 times
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MSAs, CSAs, and Urban Areas have their own issues and challenges, but generally they provide a much better measure of city size than city proper population, which is based on arbitrary boundaries.
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Old 04-02-2018, 02:59 PM
 
1,283 posts, read 753,544 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by YIMBY View Post
Is it really that surprising? Columbus is massive in terms of land area; it's over 215 sq miles. Cities like like Minneapolis (55 sq miles) and Atlanta (133 sq miles) are smaller in terms of land area and population, but feel and look much larger.
I don't really look at land area stats. I just never thought in my mind that Columbus would have the population that it does. And it's growing like crazy!
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Old 04-02-2018, 03:09 PM
 
Location: Avondale, Chicago
14,423 posts, read 26,255,947 times
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Detroit-Warren-Dearborn MSA 2016 Census estimate is 0.03% over 2010. This is not counting Ann Arbor MSA which is 5%+ over on its own.
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