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Old 04-05-2018, 06:14 PM
 
Location: Clemson, SC by way of Tyler,TX
4,892 posts, read 3,013,278 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DTXman34 View Post
Most of Travis is in Austin proper and doesn't have many declined, inner ring suburbs or even more insular, wealthy enclaves like Highland Park (generations of old money). No one is moving to Garland, Mesquite, or Grand Prairie. Likewise, Highland Park is independent from Dallas and hardly anyone is really moving there. In Dallas proper, there's tons of change and transience in areas like Uptown/Downtown, Victory Park, East Dallas, Knox-Henderson, Oak Lawn, etc. Even politically it's more of a mixed story due to more conservative suburbs such as Irving, Richardson, and Highland Park in addition to more liberal city neighborhoods. Austin/Travis is pretty easy to sum up.
DFW is all about its burbs. The burbs dominate
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Old 04-05-2018, 06:47 PM
 
1,987 posts, read 1,245,778 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gaylord_Focker View Post
DFW is all about its burbs. The burbs dominate
I'm not talking about the burbs, just the city. Burbs don't decide local ordinances in the city. Many metros have rather dominate burbs -- Bay Area, DC/NOVA, etc. That still doesn't take away from San Fran or DC proper. Dallas proper is its own thing.
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Old 04-05-2018, 07:35 PM
 
Location: Clemson, SC by way of Tyler,TX
4,892 posts, read 3,013,278 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DTXman34 View Post
I'm not talking about the burbs, just the city. Burbs don't decide local ordinances in the city. Many metros have rather dominate burbs -- Bay Area, DC/NOVA, etc. That still doesn't take away from San Fran or DC proper. Dallas proper is its own thing.
Dallas proper in the house!!
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Old 04-05-2018, 08:21 PM
 
Location: The Pacific Northwest
6,015 posts, read 6,390,518 times
Reputation: 8288
Sorry, but I think the whole premise of this thread is just ridiculously fanciful.

No city “cares” about its image. A city is the sum of its parts, not a discrete entity. A city encompasses everyone to the billionaire living in his palatial coffin to the bum urinating his hatred into the street. All of that and the entire spectrum in between is “the city”. Unless you have data that show the MAJORITY of a city’s residents care about its image, this is all just frou frou garbage.
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Old 04-05-2018, 09:32 PM
 
29,973 posts, read 27,489,279 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bluefox View Post
Sorry, but I think the whole premise of this thread is just ridiculously fanciful.

No city “cares” about its image. A city is the sum of its parts, not a discrete entity. A city encompasses everyone to the billionaire living in his palatial coffin to the bum urinating his hatred into the street. All of that and the entire spectrum in between is “the city”. Unless you have data that show the MAJORITY of a city’s residents care about its image, this is all just frou frou garbage.
Actually I think there's some validity to a city caring about its image, but it's not always about all of the residents; it's primarily about city leadership (political, business, etc.) and its underlying philosophy when it comes to marketing the city and protecting and promoting its brand. For some cities, it's not so much about being obsessed with their image as it is creating one from scratch, building on it, and then protecting and promoting it. One example is Charlotte, NC. As its national profile began to rise due to all of the bank aquisitions its hometown banks made in the 90's, Hugh McColl, former CEO of NationsBank (which eventually became Bank of America) wanted Charlotte to project a more modern, cosmopolitan image fitting of its newfound stature. The banking industry in particular loves projecting strength and confidence with its highrises and thus a highrise boom began in Charlotte that, taking the long view, continues until this day.

When it comes to aspects of a city's image that a city's residents tend to protect and help promote, I think of cities like Charleston and Savannah that are known for their gracious hospitality. In those cities, you'll find residents who take it as a personal mission to help promote that image and while I believe most are genuine in their efforts, that image is also literally responsible for a nice chunk of the city's bread and butter--tourism. Of course every single resident in neither city is going to exude hospitality, but apparently enough do to the extent that these cities are widely noted for embodying this certain characteristic.
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Old 04-05-2018, 09:45 PM
 
Location: The Pacific Northwest
6,015 posts, read 6,390,518 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mutiny77 View Post
Actually I think there's some validity to a city caring about its image, but it's not always about all of the residents; it's primarily about city leadership (political, business, etc.) and its underlying philosophy when it comes to marketing the city and protecting and promoting its brand. For some cities, it's not so much about being obsessed with their image as it is creating one from scratch, building on it, and then protecting and promoting it. One example is Charlotte, NC. As its national profile began to rise due to all of the bank aquisitions its hometown banks made in the 90's, Hugh McColl, former CEO of NationsBank (which eventually became Bank of America) wanted Charlotte to project a more modern, cosmopolitan image fitting of its newfound stature. The banking industry in particular loves projecting strength and confidence with its highrises and thus a highrise boom began in Charlotte that, taking the long view, continues until this day.

When it comes to aspects of a city's image that a city's residents tend to protect and help promote, I think of cities like Charleston and Savannah that are known for their gracious hospitality. In those cities, you'll find residents who take it as a personal mission to help promote that image and while I believe most are genuine in their efforts, that image is also literally responsible for a nice chunk of the city's bread and butter--tourism. Of course every single resident in neither city is going to exude hospitality, but apparently enough do to the extent that these cities are widely noted for embodying this certain characteristic.
What I understand from your post is two points:

(1) city leaders often do try to market themselves in one way or another

(2) certain cities try to “live up to their expectations” based on preexisting ideas of how that city is.

If I’ve missed something let me know.

With regard to your first point, absolutely true. That is the chamber of commerce of every city, town and village in the U.S. However, that is not a cultural aspect, necessarily, of any city, town or village in the US. Whether it is Charlotte, NC or Chillicothe, MO.

With regard to your second point, okay, maybe some truth to that. If the city’s perception is molded upon a certain stereotype, and that stereotype is lucrative, then great. But why is it significant to someone in that city who doesn’t have a vested interest in the tourism industry? That doesn’t necessarily mean the auto shop guy in a touristy area is going to be nice. But if he is, how can you or I tell if it’s even remotely related to him caring about our impressions of the city in which he lives?
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Old 04-06-2018, 02:56 AM
 
29,973 posts, read 27,489,279 times
Reputation: 18567
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bluefox View Post
What I understand from your post is two points:

(1) city leaders often do try to market themselves in one way or another

(2) certain cities try to “live up to their expectations” based on preexisting ideas of how that city is.

If I’ve missed something let me know.

With regard to your first point, absolutely true. That is the chamber of commerce of every city, town and village in the U.S. However, that is not a cultural aspect, necessarily, of any city, town or village in the US. Whether it is Charlotte, NC or Chillicothe, MO.
Well in the case of Charlotte, it was about more than just having a savvy marketing strategy; it was about remaking the actual city into a more dynamic, progressive place befitting of its rising national profile and that has had some effect on the local culture.

Quote:
With regard to your second point, okay, maybe some truth to that. If the city’s perception is molded upon a certain stereotype, and that stereotype is lucrative, then great. But why is it significant to someone in that city who doesn’t have a vested interest in the tourism industry? That doesn’t necessarily mean the auto shop guy in a touristy area is going to be nice. But if he is, how can you or I tell if it’s even remotely related to him caring about our impressions of the city in which he lives?
How about just sheer civic pride? I think you just might underestimate the psychological effects related to our love (or hate or even indifference) of the places we call home. If there's anything I've learned during the years I've been active on C-D, it's that many people tend to see their cities as reflections of themselves and their values. We obviously know that's true on a national level but it's also very true within a local context.
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