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Old 04-05-2018, 05:32 AM
 
Location: North Dakota
7,737 posts, read 9,030,452 times
Reputation: 11107

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Quote:
Originally Posted by nottylerdurden View Post
So, I've been a resident of Minneapolis for about two years now, and I absolutely adore the amount lakes and rivers, arts and music scene, cost of living, economy, education, research, and general ease of navigation. (I'm a student & working professional)

I am looking to move however, mainly due to the horrible social culture and social attitudes. This city will make a transplant a loner. We've all heard of the "seattle freeze" but nothing can be compared to this, I've lived here for two years and have really only been able to get to know two or three people. I'm also sick of the winter, though growing up in Green Bay, Wisconsin, it's not something I'm not used to.

The latter bits of what I described are really Minnesota stereotypes, and I really want to get away from all that. People here brag about the Twin Cities as if they have something to prove, but I'm afraid there's issues that I don't want to waste my 20ties dealing with (26 now).

Anyone able to recommend a city that may be a lot like Minneapolis, without the absolutely closed off populace and typical minnesota/midwest stereotypes?? Music scene and natural attractions are a must.

Denver? Portland? Boston? Idk, suggestions?
It takes years to make friends everywhere. People move back home these days and likely just fall in with their high school friends again. After they get married and have kids parents cater solely to their kids. Two years is not enough time anywhere to get a social life in any city.
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Old 04-05-2018, 05:44 AM
 
16,019 posts, read 19,683,915 times
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My son loves Portland. Although there has been some real influx of population growth which makes rents high. But, it is a beautiful and very cultural city.

Prior to that he lived in Denver for years and like that as well.

If I were you, and could afford a couple of quick plane rides to a few places to see them in person, that is what I'd do. Your right at a major airline hub...check cheapo air and do a few weekend trips.

Portand:
https://www.tripadvisor.com/Attracti...nd_Oregon.html

And, check out the home page of City Data there is a search engine to find out everything there is to know about any city in the U.S. Click on "cities" and search by name. Fantastic resource. http://www.city-data.com/

Make sure and post updates
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Old 04-05-2018, 05:48 AM
 
16,019 posts, read 19,683,915 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NDak15 View Post
It takes years to make friends everywhere. People move back home these days and likely just fall in with their high school friends again. After they get married and have kids parents cater solely to their kids. Two years is not enough time anywhere to get a social life in any city.
OP I know what you are talking about. You have to experience it to understand

It is a regional thing....and the same in a lot of the upper Midwest. Wonderful, salt of the earth people....but very closed off to folks they don't know.

I moved up here in 81....from my home state of Calif. it does take many years, and I had in-laws and a connection through marriage.

Happy hunting for your next home area.

Last edited by JanND; 04-05-2018 at 05:58 AM..
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Old 04-05-2018, 08:09 AM
 
Location: Clemson, SC by way of Tyler,TX
4,857 posts, read 2,984,533 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nottylerdurden View Post
Also, Austin's summers look incredibly brutal. I'm not sure I could handle an average of 96 in August, good god.
It's not that part. It could also have a heat index of 90 in November. Most of Texas. Austin is fine, just too damn hot, and too much traffic.
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Old 04-05-2018, 08:22 AM
 
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I seriously can't even imagine November and 90 degrees...does texas ever get a break?
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Old 04-05-2018, 08:27 AM
Status: "Summer!" (set 19 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
87,002 posts, read 102,592,596 times
Reputation: 33059
Quote:
Originally Posted by NDak15 View Post
It takes years to make friends everywhere. People move back home these days and likely just fall in with their high school friends again. After they get married and have kids parents cater solely to their kids. Two years is not enough time anywhere to get a social life in any city.
It does and it doesn't take years. My niece and husband moved to FL, she took a belly-dancing class and they had an instant friend group. There's a water aerobics class here in my town that is very social outside of class; a bunch of them went to Denver to see "Hamilton" recently. Then there are classes that are not social. It's serendipity. I agree that kids change everything.

Two years is a short time, yes, but if things aren't happening and they aren't happy, maybe it's time to move on.
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Old 04-05-2018, 09:53 AM
 
Location: Mars City
5,091 posts, read 2,142,356 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nottylerdurden View Post
I seriously can't even imagine November and 90 degrees...does texas ever get a break?
The state is actually mild from November through April. 90 degrees being common in November is nonsense. There's a difference between heat index and actual temperatures. Since Austin is drier than say Houston, there's no way the heat index could be in the 90s in Austin in November.
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Old 04-05-2018, 10:26 AM
 
38 posts, read 20,398 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Thoreau424 View Post
The state is actually mild from November through April. 90 degrees being common in November is nonsense. There's a difference between heat index and actual temperatures. Since Austin is drier than say Houston, there's no way the heat index could be in the 90s in Austin in November.
I figured it was a rarity or an exaggeration, still, I don't think I'd like to tolerate Austin's summer. I've checked the climate norms and they're pretty daunting. It does seem like a cool place to hang out though.
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Old 04-05-2018, 12:21 PM
 
Location: Clemson, SC by way of Tyler,TX
4,857 posts, read 2,984,533 times
Reputation: 3399
Quote:
Originally Posted by nottylerdurden View Post
I figured it was a rarity or an exaggeration, still, I don't think I'd like to tolerate Austin's summer. I've checked the climate norms and they're pretty daunting. It does seem like a cool place to hang out though.
Keep an eye on it this year. I was shocked, but Dallas which is milder than Austin, had 95 degree heat index, 11 pm at night, in October.
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Old 04-05-2018, 03:32 PM
 
Location: North Dakota
7,737 posts, read 9,030,452 times
Reputation: 11107
Quote:
Originally Posted by JanND View Post
OP I know what you are talking about. You have to experience it to understand

It is a regional thing....and the same in a lot of the upper Midwest. Wonderful, salt of the earth people....but very closed off to folks they don't know.

I moved up here in 81....from my home state of Calif. it does take many years, and I had in-laws and a connection through marriage.

Happy hunting for your next home area.
I don't think it's a regional thing. I really think this moving in with parents after college or having one foot in your hometown after college while living somewhere else isn't conducive to making friends in a new town. And parents over scheduling their kids means socializing with parents is pretty much out these days.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Katarina Witt View Post
It does and it doesn't take years. My niece and husband moved to FL, she took a belly-dancing class and they had an instant friend group. There's a water aerobics class here in my town that is very social outside of class; a bunch of them went to Denver to see "Hamilton" recently. Then there are classes that are not social. It's serendipity. I agree that kids change everything.

Two years is a short time, yes, but if things aren't happening and they aren't happy, maybe it's time to move on.
I think that's the exception rather than the rule. Even taking classes is still often a shot in the dark trying to make friends. Same with clubs. People under the age of about 50 don't seem to join clubs anymore. We live in a very child centric society now.

I'd say give a place five years before you start looking elsewhere due to no social life.
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