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Old 04-09-2018, 05:15 PM
 
111 posts, read 89,742 times
Reputation: 220

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Quote:
Originally Posted by pystachio View Post
[font="Verdana"]How do you all feel about this --> Minnesota ranks #4 in the USA for Social Environment. USNews is a very valuable resource tool and I'm currently using it to find which area of the country to move to. I love the idea of moving to either Minneapolis or Rochester but I don't like the idea of shoveling every day.
Take a deeper look at the metrics. The three sub-categories of "Social Environment" are Community Engagement, Social Support, and Voter Participation. As a MN native, I can vouch that the people here care a lot about their communities, and exercising the right to vote is seen as very important. And I can see why MN would be strong regarding Social Support since, as others have mentioned, a majority of residents have lived here their whole lives and have a strong network of family and friends.

But, I agree with what non-natives have observed that the lack of transplants and abundance of natives with a full social network creates an environment where is difficult to make close connections that go beyond surface level friendliness.
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Old 04-09-2018, 06:37 PM
 
Location: Midwest
120 posts, read 144,803 times
Reputation: 72
Quote:
Originally Posted by nottylerdurden View Post
However, beneath that, it's closed off, reserved, and exclusive. While everyone, quite literally everyone, is friendly, very few people are personal.

If you're used to LA prices, even the rising costs in MSP will seem dirt cheap to you. Condos in downtown topping $1 million are big stories in the news...while in LA....I assume that's fairly common. Shoveling sucks but honestly it's the cold you're going to have an issue with moving from a warm climate.
I'm from New England, and that's how we're described. That we take a long time before we're accepting of outsiders. So this whole discussion is really more about colder areas of the US vs warm. I think it's like that all around the world. There's warm personalities in Spain and Italy, but colder personalities in Scandinavia.

I like the cold now. It energizes me. I've been taking cold showers every morning for the past two years and I couldn't live without them. I don't fair well on the hot days out here especially where I am in the Valley. My move is really coming down to the Pacific Northwest Vs. Minnesota. I've considered Utah too but there could be some issues depending on the area you move to with the LDS standards thing. Economy is very good there, but the minimum wage in both UT and MN is a bit of a concern.
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Old 04-09-2018, 08:49 PM
 
Location: North Dakota
7,721 posts, read 9,018,166 times
Reputation: 11083
Quote:
Originally Posted by Count David View Post
Denver has a ton of transplants, many of whom are interested in making new friends. We do have a fair amount of them who won't make it a secret that weed was one of the reasons they moved here, but still, most of them are functional beyond that (), and at least half of transplants are upwardly mobile.

The natives that another poster mentioned are quite militant, but since you're from WI, most of them wouldn't have the geographical knowledge to adequately insult you for it. You're not from CA, TX, or NE (Nebraska), so you're pretty safe. The main gripes about transplants is that we are raising the cost-of-living, contributing to the increased traffic, destroying the trails (many natives don't even go on those anyway lol), making CO more "librul", and on and on. They seriously want CO to return to how it was in 1980. They will tell you Colorado is full ( ), to go back "home", and Broncos Broncos Broncos.

I've had friends of both types, but as I've made no secret on the Denver/CO forums, I myself am not happy with the social situation here, and I've been here 11 years. Small talk is non-existent, neighborliness is unheard of, customer service is atrocious, and it just seems like many people are interested in sticking to their own scenes, and could care less if anybody outside of those scenes exists. There is a very obvious "me first" attitude here as well...many people are just flat out rude and lack common courtesy.

Of course, the biggest no-no in Denver/Colorado is criticizing it or anything about it in any way (this is the golden rule shared by natives and transplants). You have to love this place with all of your heart at all times. Repeat after me: This is the most wonderful place in the world and we are all lucky to be here. Remember this any time you think about saying anything critical, and if you do, at least try to be inquisitive or whimsical about it.

All that being said, I don't think Denver is like Minneapolis at all, we just don't care as much about having an orderly society, and we don't have any trees and lakes (comparatively speaking). Our winters are much better though. Portland may indeed be more what you're looking for, but a big contingent of the population is quite helpless, and they have the nativism thing going on as well (I have a ton of friends in Portland, and I think making friends and keeping them is a lot easier there, overall they just seem more open to more things, even with their faults).

What about Chicago?
Are you sure you weren't in Montana? It's the same mentality except a lot of people want it to be Montana 1880 instead of 1980.
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Old 04-09-2018, 09:00 PM
 
Location: Arvada, CO
13,236 posts, read 24,412,267 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ndak15 View Post
are you sure you weren't in montana? It's the same mentality except a lot of people want it to be montana 1880 instead of 1980.
Yeah....
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Old 04-09-2018, 09:35 PM
 
38 posts, read 20,364 times
Reputation: 56
Quote:
Originally Posted by pystachio View Post
I'm from New England, and that's how we're described. That we take a long time before we're accepting of outsiders. So this whole discussion is really more about colder areas of the US vs warm. I think it's like that all around the world. There's warm personalities in Spain and Italy, but colder personalities in Scandinavia.

I like the cold now. It energizes me. I've been taking cold showers every morning for the past two years and I couldn't live without them. I don't fair well on the hot days out here especially where I am in the Valley. My move is really coming down to the Pacific Northwest Vs. Minnesota. I've considered Utah too but there could be some issues depending on the area you move to with the LDS standards thing. Economy is very good there, but the minimum wage in both UT and MN is a bit of a concern.
The minimum wage in Minneapolis is hitting $15/hour by 2022, and the rest of wages with it (at least if the trend of history proves true). PNW is absolutely stunning, but COL is far higher, and MN can be very beautiful in areas if you don't mind flat land - and we do have hilly/foothill areas in SE and NE MN.

The thing that always scared me away from PNW is the 7-8 months of 90% overcast. Even living in MN and WI that seems pretty daunting, lol.
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Old 10-29-2018, 05:23 PM
 
3,574 posts, read 1,187,224 times
Reputation: 2330
Atlanta may be an opinion.

It's literally a city of transplants. Everywhere within a 50 mile radius of the city is full of individuals from other parts of the country, so you should have no issue meeting new people.
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Old 10-30-2018, 01:58 PM
 
Location: Georgia native in McKinney, TX
7,386 posts, read 10,066,687 times
Reputation: 5913
Quote:
Originally Posted by nottylerdurden View Post
I've been looking into Austin, though the cost of living seems rather high and I'm hesitant about Texas, despite Austin being the black sheep in that deep red state.
Any of the major cities in Texas defy the deep redness of their suburbs and the rest of the state, Houston, Austin, San Antonio, Dallas, Fort Worth... all at least purple if not outright blue in their core. Lovely mild winters nice springs and falls, unbearably hot during July and August.

And as an Atlanta native can vouch for what the previous poster says there. Pretty much true for all of the booming sunbelt cities.... Nashville, Charlotte, Raleigh, Tampa, Orlando, Miami plus the aforementioned Texas cities.
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Old 10-30-2018, 05:04 PM
 
224 posts, read 113,809 times
Reputation: 437
Why was this thread bumped? It was written several months ago so it's likely the OP may not even see it?

In any case, having made the move from (city of) Atlanta to Minneapolis, I wouldn't personally recommend it if the OP is truly looking for Minneapolis without Minnesotans. Yes, the people are far more outgoing but visually and culturally they don't have a lot in common. For one, the OP already stated that the South is not what they are looking for; Atlanta is still culturally Southern despite a ton of transplants (many/majority of whom are from other parts of the South). Far fewer bodies of water, the economy isn't very favorable in many fields for younger people and those who lack experience.

I would recommend the bigger cities in the eastern portion of the Midwest or the Northeast. The West is nice but IME isn't less "on the surface" friendly than Minneapolis is.

Quote:
Originally Posted by pystachio View Post
I'm from New England, and that's how we're described. That we take a long time before we're accepting of outsiders. So this whole discussion is really more about colder areas of the US vs warm. I think it's like that all around the world. [...] My move is really coming down to the Pacific Northwest Vs. Minnesota.
My fellow New Englander, you're in the Midwest now? Where did you choose?
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Old 10-30-2018, 05:39 PM
 
3,574 posts, read 1,187,224 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LeTraveler View Post
Why was this thread bumped? It was written several months ago so it's likely the OP may not even see it?
I could have swore I saw a post from the OP yesterday asking for more ideas, but now it's gone.

Then again, maybe I was just seeing things.
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Old 11-02-2018, 12:30 PM
 
Location: Beautiful and sanitary DC
1,500 posts, read 2,168,487 times
Reputation: 1411
Quote:
Originally Posted by nbtmn View Post
But, I agree with what non-natives have observed that the lack of transplants and abundance of natives with a full social network creates an environment where is difficult to make close connections that go beyond surface level friendliness.
I've heard the same from other transplants, and even from locals. There's an insider-ness which is tough to overcome.

Nashville and New Orleans are interesting suggestions, but they do come with living in the conservative, hot South. (Nashville in particular is worth elaborating upon: it has lovely mountains that moderate the summers just a bit, and a booming healthcare sector, but it's also mostly country music.) I wouldn't recommend Austin for just that reason; it's also very far from Austin to anywhere else reasonable.

You'd mentioned Chicago -- it might work, very diverse music scene but not nearly as outdoorsy as Minneapolis. Outside of the core gentrified areas, it's not that hard to own a car, and IME the rehearsal spaces, etc. tend to be in industrial parts of town anyways.

Some other ideas:
https://www.citylab.com/design/2012/...c-scenes/2709/
The music industry has become much more centralized in recent years, so a lot of local scenes have withered. A lot of the local bands from smaller Eastern cities end up in Brooklyn before long, or LA for the west coast.

Is Canada an option? Lots of terrific musicians and outdoors activities in cities like Montreal, though that's also closed-off professionally (both as an American and Anglophone), and would have much lower pay in the healthcare industry.
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