U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S.
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
 
Old 04-14-2018, 08:39 PM
 
2,164 posts, read 1,463,127 times
Reputation: 2171

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by Katarina Witt View Post
There is no real definition of "McMansion". They're old style big, ostentatious houses. All of them built in the same era look very similar, just like the houses of today. There are about a half dozen general styles.

yeah its slang theres no definition. but I thought you were talking about the actual old houses as being McMansions, not the newer ones. Oh I agree most of the newer ones (1980s to today) are cookie cutter. but I dont really think they're old style. they may have elements of it but its just not the same style.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 04-14-2018, 11:00 PM
Status: "Summer!" (set 20 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
87,006 posts, read 102,592,596 times
Reputation: 33059
Quote:
Originally Posted by _Buster View Post
yeah its slang theres no definition. but I thought you were talking about the actual old houses as being McMansions, not the newer ones. Oh I agree most of the newer ones (1980s to today) are cookie cutter. but I dont really think they're old style. they may have elements of it but its just not the same style.
I was talking about the old houses. They were the McMansions of their day. They're cookie cutterish, too; maybe, as I said a half-dozen different styles. They were meant for show, ostentatious. It's funny that now people revere them.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-14-2018, 11:10 PM
 
Location: North Caroline
260 posts, read 130,804 times
Reputation: 386
Quote:
Originally Posted by Katarina Witt View Post
I was talking about the old houses. They were the McMansions of their day. They're cookie cutterish, too; maybe, as I said a half-dozen different styles. They were meant for show, ostentatious. It's funny that now people revere them.
I think you have a misconception about McMansions. The term "McMansion" implies mass-production. The houses you typically find in "old-money" neighborhoods that were built during the early 1900s were often designed by architects as opposed to being "mass-produced". This is not the same as the McMansions you see today popping up all over the US by builders such as Toll Brothers who jumble together a bunch of elements from various architectural styles into one monstrosity of a house. These McMansions often lack the architectural integrity and build quality of houses designed by architects. So no, the historical houses we are talking about are not cookie-cutter. They may be extravagant and luxurious, but they are tastefully done, not gaudy like McMansions.


See more here: McMansions 101 Special Edition: Mansion vs... | McMansion Hell
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-14-2018, 11:46 PM
 
Location: New Mexico
6,571 posts, read 3,664,491 times
Reputation: 12362
Quote:
Originally Posted by STL74 View Post
St. Louis
It was fashionable in St. Louis and other places for the wealthy to have a town house and a country house. The city grew up and engulfed the country house areas that we now consider as the homes of the wealthy. A few of the town houses survive but most are gone.


The city homes of the upper middle class and the professional class families still exist in parts of St Louis. I enjoy walking through some neighborhoods like the homes around Benton Park. Lafayette Square is a little older. The city was mostly burned in 1849 and afterwards, by ordinance, the homes had to be built of brick. There were local clay mines just west of the city so the brick makers made a killing.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-14-2018, 11:51 PM
Status: "Summer!" (set 20 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
87,006 posts, read 102,592,596 times
Reputation: 33059
Quote:
Originally Posted by TarHeelTerritory View Post
I think you have a misconception about McMansions. The term "McMansion" implies mass-production. The houses you typically find in "old-money" neighborhoods that were built during the early 1900s were often designed by architects as opposed to being "mass-produced". This is not the same as the McMansions you see today popping up all over the US by builders such as Toll Brothers who jumble together a bunch of elements from various architectural styles into one monstrosity of a house. These McMansions often lack the architectural integrity and build quality of houses designed by architects. So no, the historical houses we are talking about are not cookie-cutter. They may be extravagant and luxurious, but they are tastefully done, not gaudy like McMansions.


See more here: McMansions 101 Special Edition: Mansion vs... | McMansion Hell
McMansion is slang. It can mean anything anyone wants it to mean.
https://www.goodreads.com/quotes/126...said-in-rather
" “When I use a word,’ Humpty Dumpty said in rather a scornful tone, ‘it means just what I choose it to mean — neither more nor less.’

’The question is,’ said Alice, ‘whether you can make words mean so many different things.’

’The question is,’ said Humpty Dumpty, ‘which is to be master — that’s all.” "


The houses are built according to the standards of the times.

"Tasteful" is also in the eye of the beholder.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-15-2018, 12:06 AM
 
Location: New Mexico
6,571 posts, read 3,664,491 times
Reputation: 12362
When I was a city planner there were people who would demolish one or two smaller homes in residential neighborhoods and build monstrous homes that were way out of style and size for the neighborhood. These were considered "McMansions" in the local usage. They stuck out like a bad bruise. We ended up creating conservation districts at the residents' request to protect the neighborhood character. Other places probably used the label differently.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-15-2018, 12:21 AM
 
6,647 posts, read 2,442,906 times
Reputation: 4621
Garden District, New Orleans
Pacific Heights, San Francisco
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-15-2018, 12:55 AM
 
Location: North Caroline
260 posts, read 130,804 times
Reputation: 386
Quote:
Originally Posted by Katarina Witt View Post
McMansion is slang. It can mean anything anyone wants it to mean.
https://www.goodreads.com/quotes/126...said-in-rather
" “When I use a word,’ Humpty Dumpty said in rather a scornful tone, ‘it means just what I choose it to mean — neither more nor less.’

’The question is,’ said Alice, ‘whether you can make words mean so many different things.’

’The question is,’ said Humpty Dumpty, ‘which is to be master — that’s all.” "


The houses are built according to the standards of the times.

"Tasteful" is also in the eye of the beholder.

Words do not just mean anything that we want them to mean. If that were the case, standardized languages would not be possible.

Anyways, for the sake of remaining on topic, what one regards as tasteful is of course largely subjective. But it would be downright foolish to think that the better part of today's McMansions even begin to compare with yesteryear's actual mansions in terms of craftsmanship and architectural integrity.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-15-2018, 01:34 PM
 
56,617 posts, read 80,910,543 times
Reputation: 12507
Skaneateles NY(village): https://www.google.com/maps/@42.9430...6!9m2!1b1!2i40


https://www.google.com/maps/@42.9497...6!9m2!1b1!2i40


Cazenovia NY(village): https://www.google.com/maps/@42.9368...6!9m2!1b1!2i40


https://www.google.com/maps/@42.9372...6!9m2!1b1!2i40
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-15-2018, 04:41 PM
 
Location: WI
2,891 posts, read 3,215,702 times
Reputation: 5091
The northern suburbs of Chicago have some of the prettiest homes, IMO. Pretty "old money" area.
Kenilworth:
https://www.google.com/maps/@42.0892...7i13312!8i6656
Wilmette:
https://www.google.com/maps/@42.0852...7i13312!8i6656
https://www.google.com/maps/@42.0814...7i13312!8i6656
Winnetka:
https://www.google.com/maps/@42.1021...7i13312!8i6656

The Milwaukee area has some similar neighborhoods, albeit on a slightly smaller scale:
Whitefish Bay:
https://www.google.com/maps/@43.1142...7i13312!8i6656
Shorewood:
https://www.google.com/maps/@43.0828...7i13312!8i6656
Near UW-Milwaukee:
https://www.google.com/maps/@43.0785...7i13312!8i6656
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S.
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top