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Old 04-18-2018, 04:32 PM
 
Location: North Caroline
260 posts, read 130,455 times
Reputation: 385

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Quote:
Originally Posted by jessemh431 View Post
Pasadena does have a similar area.
https://goo.gl/maps/8G3TokzoSWL2
https://goo.gl/maps/5BihrRuzgev

West Adams used to be money money money, it was bad for a while, but it's making a strong resurgence thanks to the beautiful old homes and proximity to DTLA.
https://goo.gl/maps/nk2L9Lc1jGJ2
https://goo.gl/maps/dToJpS31ipR2

Not sure if it would be considered old money or not since SoCal is just so new compared to the rest of the US development, Coronado Island in San Diego.
https://goo.gl/maps/xtCENaLgSd52
https://goo.gl/maps/eRuELxsUX2L2

Piedmont in the Bay Area
https://goo.gl/maps/8xaKyVHXDAB2
https://goo.gl/maps/HPXdjiHAWnp

St. Francis Woods in SF
https://goo.gl/maps/gAk3AVBMhNL2
https://goo.gl/maps/dw4DUuXsRio
Beautiful street views again. I actually visited San Diego during the winter holiday and remember seeing those charming older homes on Coronado.

https://www.google.com/maps/@32.6833...7i13312!8i6656

This street view above is quite the striking juxtaposition with the East coast Colonial-style home sitting behind those tall palm trees.
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Old 04-18-2018, 08:44 PM
 
52 posts, read 25,098 times
Reputation: 40
Quote:
Originally Posted by gladhands View Post
I think upper-middle-class is a fairly modern concept? The truly wealthy, as we think of it today was an exceedingly small group. A typical city wouldn’t have more than 3 families that would qualify...surely not enough for full neighborhoods of them. Today’s upper middle class is prewar rich.
There would definitely be more than 3 families that would be considered old money. In Boston the Social Register had about 8,000 people back in 1950.
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Old 04-19-2018, 12:29 AM
 
Location: Los Angeles
5,370 posts, read 12,978,292 times
Reputation: 5349
Default Pics I took in Hancock Park Los Angeles

Hancock Park/Windsor Square Los Angeles






The Nat King Cole estate


The Chandler estate (Los Angeles Times, The Dorothy Chandler Pavillion)



Last edited by pwright1; 04-19-2018 at 01:37 AM..
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Old 04-19-2018, 01:30 AM
 
Location: Los Angeles
5,370 posts, read 12,978,292 times
Reputation: 5349
West Adams Los Angeles












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Old 04-19-2018, 12:13 PM
 
1,085 posts, read 2,110,523 times
Reputation: 1189
Quote:
Originally Posted by Katarina Witt View Post
Pittsburgh doesn't have much "old money". The first time I heard that term was when I was in college (in Pittsburgh) from the Philadelphia students. Andrew Carnegie lived in NYC. The Heinz family does live there to this day I believe, but in general, Pittsburgh is a working-class town. I frankly find the term "old money" off-putting and condescending to those with "new money" or "old money".
Oh dear Katarina ... I guess you haven't spent time in Squirrel Hill, or Sewickley Heights, or Mt. Lebanon, or Shadyside and Point Breeze (admittedly distinctly down market now), or Highland Park. At the end of the 19th Century, which is precisely when most of those "old money" neighborhoods were developed, Pittsburgh had more wealth per capita than any other US city. Not just the people you mentioned, but Frick, Westinghouse, Phipps, lots o' Mellons, etc., and the managing classes at their companies. Your point about "old money," BTW, is on target in my view.
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Old 04-19-2018, 01:23 PM
Status: "Summer!" (set 19 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
87,000 posts, read 102,581,357 times
Reputation: 33059
I stand by what I said about Pittsburgh being a more working person's city. I actually had family in Squirrel Hill and Highland Park. (Highland Park was a long time ago!) Spent lots of time in Shadyside when I went to Pitt. As far as Squirrel Hill, many of the residents are Jewish, descended from from Jewish immigrants, and worked (and still work) for their money. According to Wiki, the Jewish community became centered in SH in the 1920s, definitely well past "old money" time.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Squirrel_Hill_(Pittsburgh)

Never been to Mt. Lebo. Its demographics don't sound like "old money" either, as its population grew a lot in the 1920s, and then continued to grow until 1980.
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Old 04-19-2018, 02:02 PM
 
6,968 posts, read 14,093,325 times
Reputation: 4553
Quote:
Originally Posted by Katarina Witt View Post
I stand by what I said about Pittsburgh being a more working person's city. I actually had family in Squirrel Hill and Highland Park. (Highland Park was a long time ago!) Spent lots of time in Shadyside when I went to Pitt. As far as Squirrel Hill, many of the residents are Jewish, descended from from Jewish immigrants, and worked (and still work) for their money. According to Wiki, the Jewish community became centered in SH in the 1920s, definitely well past "old money" time.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Squirrel_Hill_(Pittsburgh)

Never been to Mt. Lebo. Its demographics don't sound like "old money" either, as its population grew a lot in the 1920s, and then continued to grow until 1980.
By that definition, nothing on the west coast is allowed to have "old money," but that's totally false as shown in my posts with SD, LA, and the Bay.
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Old 04-19-2018, 02:24 PM
 
2,164 posts, read 1,462,571 times
Reputation: 2167
I just don't know what to say if someone thinks money made 100 years ago or even older, is not old money. There's just going to be no possibility of agreement.
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Old 04-19-2018, 03:21 PM
Status: "Summer!" (set 19 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
87,000 posts, read 102,581,357 times
Reputation: 33059
Quote:
Originally Posted by jessemh431 View Post
By that definition, nothing on the west coast is allowed to have "old money," but that's totally false as shown in my posts with SD, LA, and the Bay.
I don't think your pictures are proof of "old money"; they're proof of big old houses. You don't know who built them. The original owners may well have been "new money" people rather than people with inherited wealth of several generations.

Quote:
Originally Posted by _Buster View Post
I just don't know what to say if someone thinks money made 100 years ago or even older, is not old money. There's just going to be no possibility of agreement.
100 years? The 1920s were not quite 100 years ago, in fact, 1929 wasn't even 90 years ago. So someone came over here from Europe as an immigrant with nothing but the clothes on their back, and made enough money to build a big house in the 1920s and that makes it "old money"? There's not a lot of inherited wealth in that scenario. Sounds like "new money" to me.

While I'm at it, I'd like to say that all these pictures of big old houses are just that, big old houses. There are many similar styles.

Here's an interesting article about "Old Money": https://classroom.synonym.com/defini...-12080893.html
I do not agree with all of it.
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Old 04-19-2018, 03:43 PM
 
2,164 posts, read 1,462,571 times
Reputation: 2167
Quote:
Originally Posted by Katarina Witt View Post

100 years? The 1920s were not quite 100 years ago, in fact, 1929 wasn't even 90 years ago. So someone came over here from Europe as an immigrant with nothing but the clothes on their back, and made enough money to build a big house in the 1920s and that makes it "old money"? There's not a lot of inherited wealth in that scenario. Sounds like "new money" to me.

While I'm at it, I'd like to say that all these pictures of big old houses are just that, big old houses. There are many similar styles.

Here's an interesting article about "Old Money": https://classroom.synonym.com/defini...-12080893.html
I do not agree with all of it.
um, the 1920s started in 1920, not 1929. ok do I really have to specify "98 years" instead of 100.

but , your quote was actually " According to Wiki, the Jewish community became centered in SH in the 1920s, definitely well past "old money" time."

You said the 1920s was well past old money time. Presumably meaning anything in the 1900s is not old money. Which is up to 118 years ago.

My definition really would be roughly anything that was made more than two generations ago, so that would be around 1960 or older. it's just that they didn't tend to build the same type of mansions in new neighborhoods then, that they did in earlier times.
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