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Old 04-13-2018, 05:50 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Iconographer View Post
Not necessarily. The Battery in Charleston was Ground Zero for Old Money; now it's mostly high profile financiers from NYC that dig the idea of pretending to be Old Charleston Money.
That is the typical situation in most 'Old Money' neighborhoods in the US today. Like my mother (who certainly knew the territory) used to say, "Most of those people were 'house poor' two generations ago".
And yet, they're still considered "Old Money Neighborhoods".
Maybe the term "old moneyed" is better representative of the types of neighborhoods in this thread - i.e. older neighborhoods built for the upper-class of the time - though not necessarily still occupied by later generations of descendants (although they could be).
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Old 04-14-2018, 04:23 AM
 
Location: St Simons Island, GA
23,044 posts, read 35,003,509 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RocketSci View Post
Maybe the term "old moneyed" is better representative of the types of neighborhoods in this thread - i.e. older neighborhoods built for the upper-class of the time - though not necessarily still occupied by later generations of descendants (although they could be).
Yes, there are neighborhoods of that description that lost their status and then regained it. Here in Atlanta, two examples are Inman Park and Druid Hills.
The moneyed crowd threw Inman Park over for Druid Hills in the 1910's, then threw Druid Hills over for Buckhead in the 1920's and 30's. Both were 'rediscovered' in the 1970's.
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Old 04-14-2018, 02:58 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Iconographer View Post
Yes, there are neighborhoods of that description that lost their status and then regained it. Here in Atlanta, two examples are Inman Park and Druid Hills.
The moneyed crowd threw Inman Park over for Druid Hills in the 1910's, then threw Druid Hills over for Buckhead in the 1920's and 30's. Both were 'rediscovered' in the 1970's.
I seem to remember a WSJ article on the ‘rediscovery’ of Inman Park about 35 years ago.
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Old 04-14-2018, 06:24 PM
 
Location: Boston Metrowest (via the Philly area)
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I stumbled upon some interesting history. Although this doesn't speak to specific neighborhoods, I think the cities where you had various volumes of the "Social Register" speak to the US cities that arguably had the highest concentrations of "old money" and people of "high status."

Here's a listing of when each city's volume was first published, which is itself an indicator of how early a particularly city amassed a large enough wealthy community to actually publish a volume of the SR:

Newport, RI (1886)
New York, NY (1887)
Boston (1890)
Philadelphia (1890)
Baltimore (1892)
Chicago (1893)
Washington, DC (1903)
St. Louis (1903)
Buffalo (1903)
Pittsburgh (1904)
San Francisco (1906)
Cleveland (1910)
Cincinnati/Dayton (1910)

Apparently, by the 1920s, there were 24 cities with their own volumes, but this list definitely does seem to comport with the highest concentrations of truly (historically) "old money" neighborhoods today.

https://books.google.com/books?id=LF...20city&f=false
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Old 04-14-2018, 07:16 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by enchantedforest View Post
It is certainly not an old money neighborhood if the old money is gone, that’s for sure. Which was my question about the scenes someone posted from Baltimore.

I’m getting under the OP’s skin by being silly about Old Money among the tarheels and— as fascinating as social hierarchies may be as a topic — I kind of agree with Katarina that ‘old money’ is a divisive and pejorative term to be throwing around. All the OP really meant in starting this thread was to feature nice, high-end, old fashioned city neighborhoods, of which almost American city of any size has at least one or two.
It actually goes both ways with that term - a lot of people see old moneyed familes to be lazy inheritors who never accomplished anthing themselves. and of course the opposite, which is the old money families looking down on the nuevo rich because they are not normally as cultured and tend to be "flashy" with their money.
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Old 04-14-2018, 07:59 PM
Status: "Summer!" (set 15 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
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Quote:
Originally Posted by _Buster View Post
It actually goes both ways with that term - a lot of people see old moneyed familes to be lazy inheritors who never accomplished anthing themselves. and of course the opposite, which is the old money families looking down on the nuevo rich because they are not normally as cultured and tend to be "flashy" with their money.
So the "OM" people say, with their old style "McMansions" and their Bentleys.
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Old 04-14-2018, 08:04 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Katarina Witt View Post
So the "OM" people say, with their old style "McMansions" and their Bentleys.
Ha, I wouldn't consider most of the old ones to be McMansions though, they mostly hired architects to design them individually and are not cookie cutter. Also they are usually a lot larger and more elaborate than the modern McMansion. which some people might consider flashy!
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Old 04-14-2018, 08:17 PM
 
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I don't think most people have even heard of this mansion today, or the guy behind it. Its on the verge of unbelievable. He killed oa whole lot of random people in it apparently. I guess he would have been considered "new money" back then...

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/H._H._Holmes
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Old 04-14-2018, 08:18 PM
 
Location: STL area
990 posts, read 498,304 times
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St. Louis

Ladue, MO is the classic old money suburb
https://www.google.com/maps/@38.6168...7i13312!8i6656

Clayton, MO

https://www.google.com/maps/@38.6429...7i13312!8i6656

Central West End

https://www.google.com/maps/@38.6442...7i13312!8i6656

Huntleigh

https://www.google.com/maps/@38.6071...7i13312!8i6656
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Old 04-14-2018, 08:30 PM
Status: "Summer!" (set 15 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
86,985 posts, read 102,540,351 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by _Buster View Post
Ha, I wouldn't consider most of the old ones to be McMansions though, they mostly hired architects to design them individually and are not cookie cutter. Also they are usually a lot larger and more elaborate than the modern McMansion. which some people might consider flashy!
There is no real definition of "McMansion". They're old style big, ostentatious houses. All of them built in the same era look very similar, just like the houses of today. There are about a half dozen general styles.
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