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Old 12-02-2007, 09:33 AM
 
Location: In God
3,073 posts, read 8,277,200 times
Reputation: 510
Quote:
Originally Posted by SBCA View Post
If we're talking about TOTAL number of members of the LGBT community, the top four are:

New York
Los Angeles
Chicago
San Francisco

But this is not really a meaningful list since this is basically a list of the largest US cities (with the exception of SF). If instead we look at percentage of the population, the top four are:

San Francisco
Seattle
Atlanta
Minneapolis

Keep in mind, however that the LGBT population is very hard to estimate, and these rankings are subject to quite a bit of demographic interpretation.

Houston ranks 6th in total number of LGBT people, but is not on the list of percentage. Nevertheless, it has (apparently) an active gay community.
You're right. I was just about to post the link to the statistics correcting myself.
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Old 12-02-2007, 09:34 AM
 
Location: Philadelphia, PA
343 posts, read 568,104 times
Reputation: 189
Quote:
Originally Posted by ScrantonWilkesBarre View Post
In my humble opinion they are impossible to estimate, as so many who are LGBT lie about their orientations for fear of backlash from friends, family, and their communities. Before I "came out" back in high school the stress and worry I endured about people "outting" me was so immense that I had a panic attack and attempted suicide. With how afraid people in this nation must be about being honest about who they love thanks to the overwhelming reverence of people like Ann Coulter, for example, it is impossible to estimate a TRUE number of LGBT individuals in a community. The numbers City-Data provides of 0.1% or 0.2% in my area being same-sex couples is laughable, at best, when I know of scores of "straight" men and women around here who have confided their alternative sexual orientations in me. I'd say the real number is closer to 5%-10% of the overall population, but you'd never know that from these misleading surveys in which people lie and hide.

You're right, most estimates grossly underestimate the LGBT presence in communities. I don't think that estimates of the LGBT population are completely worthless, however. I like to think of them as more of an indicator than as true precise estimates of the gay population. You're right, 'moralistic' bullying tactics keep many gay people from truly expressing their feelings about who they love.
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Old 12-02-2007, 09:40 AM
 
Location: California
3,634 posts, read 2,852,324 times
Reputation: 2612
Default Houston ???

Houston ??? Yes, I've been there. Do I want to go back? No.
There are far too many other places that offer more.

Last edited by Kerby W-R; 12-02-2007 at 09:43 AM.. Reason: grammar again
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Old 12-02-2007, 09:43 AM
 
Location: Polish Hill, Pittsburgh, PA
26,087 posts, read 45,317,491 times
Reputation: 10960
Quote:
Originally Posted by SBCA View Post
I live in Philadelphia, and I can understand your feeling that PA is not nearly the Haven that it should be. Back home in CA, it was just always standard that gay people were members of the community. My father is gay and has always found acceptance. But in the east, it seems that people are anti-gay as the default and it takes substantial argument to change their minds. On the bright side, I feel as if Philadelphians are become more open minded and accepting of gay people. I would like to see this trend continue. I hope that marriage bans like this one are exposed for the ridiculous discriminatory actions that they truly are.
I personally don't ask for too much as a gay person. I don't care if same-sex marriage is banned, for example, as I can agree that those with conservative Christian values have valid reasons to oppose such occurrences. However, I feel it is very un-Christian for these same folks to vehemently oppose even same-sex civil unions as well, as these ceremonies are condoned and recognized by the state and the state alone---not by God.

Within the next few years I'll (hopefully) have obtained gainful employment with a CPA firm that offers medical coverage to employees and dependents. My partner currently has no medical coverage but has a slew of medical problems, and I cry sometimes to think of how much he has to suffer because he can't afford insurance. His mouth alone requires an estimated $12,000 in reconstructive surgery, braces, etc. after growing up without any dental care, and from time to time I have to hand him a tissue as his gums start to bleed. If heterosexual employees can extend medical benefits to their partners and children, then why can't homosexual employees extend those same medical benefits to their partners as well? For those who argue that doing so will overburden the system, then how about we prohibit heterosexual employees from extending their coverage to cover their families as well. Fair is fair, right?

Then there is the issue of hospital visitation rights. As I've said before a newlywed heterosexual couple that shacked up in Vegas after a drunken night (think Britney Spears) has more rights in the hospital than a homosexual couple that has been together for thirty years simply because some fat cats in Washington (or in my case Harrisburg) said so, much to the delight of folks like Ann Coulter. It is highly-probable that the newlywed couple could be permitted to be together during a crisis while the homosexual couple is deined that same privilege. If I wouldn't be permitted to be with my partner during a very serious medical issue, then why should heterosexuals? Once again, what's fair is fair, right?

I can continue on and on for quite a while, but I think I've made my stance pretty clear. Homosexual couples deserve the SAME medical, financial, and legal benefits as any heterosexual couple, and civil unions permit this to occur WITHOUT angering Christians by thinking this is an assault onto their existing marriages. The fact that so many in PA oppose even same-sex civil unions proves that they are either ignorant of the fact that these ceremonies are NOT an assault against God or are credulous enough to take these overzealous watchdog groups seriously.
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Old 12-02-2007, 09:47 AM
 
Location: Philadelphia, PA
343 posts, read 568,104 times
Reputation: 189
Quote:
Originally Posted by ScrantonWilkesBarre View Post
I personally don't ask for too much as a gay person. I don't care if same-sex marriage is banned, for example, as I can agree that those with conservative Christian values have valid reasons to oppose such occurrences. However, I feel it is very un-Christian for these same folks to vehemently oppose even same-sex civil unions as well, as these ceremonies are condoned and recognized by the state and the state alone---not by God.

Within the next few years I'll (hopefully) have obtained gainful employment with a CPA firm that offers medical coverage to employees and dependents. My partner currently has no medical coverage but has a slew of medical problems, and I cry sometimes to think of how much he has to suffer because he can't afford insurance. His mouth alone requires an estimated $12,000 in reconstructive surgery, braces, etc. after growing up without any dental care, and from time to time I have to hand him a tissue as his gums start to bleed. If heterosexual employees can extend medical benefits to their partners and children, then why can't homosexual employees extend those same medical benefits to their partners as well? For those who argue that doing so will overburden the system, then how about we prohibit heterosexual employees from extending their coverage to cover their families as well. Fair is fair, right?

Then there is the issue of hospital visitation rights. As I've said before a newlywed heterosexual couple that shacked up in Vegas after a drunken night (think Britney Spears) has more rights in the hospital than a homosexual couple that has been together for thirty years simply because some fat cats in Washington (or in my case Harrisburg) said so, much to the delight of folks like Ann Coulter. It is highly-probable that the newlywed couple could be permitted to be together during a crisis while the homosexual couple is deined that same privilege. If I wouldn't be permitted to be with my partner during a very serious medical issue, then why should heterosexuals? Once again, what's fair is fair, right?

I can continue on and on for quite a while, but I think I've made my stance pretty clear. Homosexual couples deserve the SAME medical, financial, and legal benefits as any heterosexual couple, and civil unions permit this to occur WITHOUT angering Christians by thinking this is an assault onto their existing marriages. The fact that so many in PA oppose even same-sex civil unions proves that they are either ignorant of the fact that these ceremonies are NOT an assault against God or are credulous enough to take these overzealous watchdog groups seriously.
Agreed. I believe that gay couples should have the same rights to get married as well. In my opinion, Christian values of any kind should not have the power to deny a group of people rights which are available others based on a variable as arbitrary as gender.

It seems to me that people who oppose same-sex marriage and civil unions are not only ignorant but simply do not care about people who do not share their situation.

I wish you luck Scranton.
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Old 12-02-2007, 09:50 AM
 
Location: Portland, Maine
4,179 posts, read 8,944,492 times
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I may be wrong here but doesn't Philadelphia have same-sex protection laws on the books? It seems to me Philadelphia would be quite a great place to live and they seem to promote gay tourism.
There are many states with bizarre laws that have many gay enclaves that are prosperous. Think Florida or Texas.
I too agree that civil-unions for same-gender persons should be legal. But I don't think Pennsylvania is alone in that struggle.
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Old 12-02-2007, 09:57 AM
 
Location: Philadelphia, PA
343 posts, read 568,104 times
Reputation: 189
Quote:
Originally Posted by jonjj View Post
I may be wrong here but doesn't Philadelphia have same-sex protection laws on the books? It seems to me Philadelphia would be quite a great place to live and they seem to promote gay tourism.
There are many states with bizarre laws that have many gay enclaves that are prosperous. Think Florida or Texas.
I too agree that civil-unions for same-gender persons should be legal. But I don't think Pennsylvania is alone in that struggle.
You're right. Philadelphia is a place that seems to value gay people as members of the community. However, many Philadelphians seem to express disdain for the gay community. This, I think, is an important conundrum. The city is accepting, but many residents are not.

And you may be right about the same-sex protection laws. I have not lived here for very long.
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Old 12-02-2007, 10:09 AM
 
Location: Florida (SW)
33,964 posts, read 10,861,768 times
Reputation: 44127
When I finally "came out" to myself and my family and friends (I was a very late bloomer) I moved from New England to Southern California. San Diego was an eye opener for me and very helpful experience. It has a very visible gay population and a whole district (Hillcrest) that is predominantly gay. There are plenty of gay clubs and a gay population that runs thru the socio-economic, age and orientation spectrum. I was amazed and validated to go to really nice cocktail parties in beautiful homes and clubs from sports bars to quiet little neighborhood bars (sorta like a gay cheers); it was an eye opener and it helped me find my identity, develop my values and eventually meet my true partner. For those reasons I would recommend San Diego; with that being said, my partner and I ended up settling in a non-gay neighborhood and living a life based on our interests and talents--not based on just our orientation. We are soon moving from California back to the north east. We are an older couple, not into the club life and not needing to have a "gay old time". Good Luck and may you find happiness and fulfillment, where ever you end up living.

Last edited by elston; 12-02-2007 at 10:10 AM.. Reason: missing words
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Old 12-02-2007, 11:14 AM
 
Location: California
3,634 posts, read 2,852,324 times
Reputation: 2612
Default Marriage

If everyone can't have the same rights to get married then no one should
have the right to get married. There should be no priviledged groups and no
groups who are discriminated against.
Massachusetts is the only state that has done the right thing.
A friend sent this to me a while back. Enjoy.


12 reasons why gays should not be married (keep in mind this is sarcastic and not written by me
  1. Homosexuality is not natural, much like eyeglasses, polyester, and birth control are not natural.
  2. Heterosexual marriages are valid because they produce children. Infertile couples and old people cannot get legally married because the world needs more children.
  3. Obviously gay parents will raise gay children because straight parents only raise straight children.
  4. Straight marriage will be less meaningful, since Britney Spears's 55-hour just-for-fun marriage was meaningful.
  5. Heterosexual marriage has been around for a long time, and it hasn't changed at all: women are property, Blacks can't marry Whites, and divorce is illegal.
  6. Gay marriage should be decided by the people, not the courts, because the majority-elected legislatures, not courts, have historically protected the rights of minorities.
  7. Gay marriage is not supported by religion. In a theocracy like ours, the values of one religion are always imposed on the entire country. That's why we only have one religion in America.
  8. Gay marriage will encourage people to be gay, in the same way that hanging around tall people makes you tall.
  9. Legalizing gay marriage will open the door to all kinds of crazy behavior. People may even wish to marry their pets because a dog has legal standing and can sign a marriage license.
  10. Children can never succeed without both male and female role models at home. That's why single parents are forbidden to raise children.
  11. Gay marriage will change the foundation of society. Heterosexual marriage has been around for a long time, and we could never adapt to new social norms because we haven't adapted to cars or longer lifespans.
  12. Civil unions, providing most of the same benefits as marriage with a different name are better, because a "separate but equal" institution is always constitutional. Separate schools for African-Americans worked just as well as separate marriages will for gays & lesbians.
Everyone should be treated equal without exception. NO COMPROMISE.
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Old 12-02-2007, 12:06 PM
 
Location: In God
3,073 posts, read 8,277,200 times
Reputation: 510
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kerby W-R View Post
Houston ??? Yes, I've been there. Do I want to go back? No.
There are far too many other places that offer more.
Yes Houston. You couldn't argue that if you tried.
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