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Old 04-21-2018, 06:44 PM
 
Location: Mobile,Al(the city by the bay)
3,785 posts, read 6,517,375 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DaveStavroz View Post
Southern Florida is similar to Southern California.
Beaches, palm trees, sunny weather.
Beaches,palm trees, and sunny weather can be found in: Alabama, Mississippi,Georgia and South Carolina. So there has to be another reason outside of the above mentioned.

Last edited by PortCity; 04-21-2018 at 06:56 PM..
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Old 04-21-2018, 07:19 PM
 
Location: Yakima WA
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Quote:
Originally Posted by eddie gein View Post
"the plains" should probably be it's own region but I've been told by some on these type of threads that having a "plains region" is not allowed.
I have a friend who spent most of his life in North Dakota, moved to Wichita Kansas and it was total culture shock to him...it felt very Southern to him..I think the plains is too big to be its own region.
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Old 04-21-2018, 08:52 PM
 
5,857 posts, read 14,043,096 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mvpsharky View Post
Wisconsin reminds me of parts of Southern New England
WI reminds me of Western, Central and Northern NY.
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Old 04-22-2018, 12:26 PM
 
Location: Oklahoma
6,842 posts, read 6,181,041 times
Reputation: 6119
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jay F View Post
I have a friend who spent most of his life in North Dakota, moved to Wichita Kansas and it was total culture shock to him...it felt very Southern to him..I think the plains is too big to be its own region.

Too big? Well how about we go with northern and southern plains as "regions". Tough part is where do you put Wichita?
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Old 04-22-2018, 08:55 PM
 
Location: IN
20,846 posts, read 35,932,344 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by eddie gein View Post
Too big? Well how about we go with northern and southern plains as "regions". Tough part is where do you put Wichita?
Wichita isn't northern at all, but is certainly southern influenced. The southern influences are evident to anyone who has lived along and north of I-80 in the Midwest and Central Plains region.
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Old 04-23-2018, 07:26 AM
 
Location: Brew City
4,214 posts, read 2,501,359 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Kaszilla View Post
I find it strange how some people say OK is like the Midwest but then there's people who feel that the plains region isn't Midwestern at all.
I'm sure it depends on your experience with the Midwest. I've lived in 3 Great Lakes states so that to me is the Midwest. The plains states feel totally different to me than WI, MI, and OH (the 3 Midwestern states I've lived in).


To me, the Midwest almost feels like a bit of a North/South thing. The Great Lakes states are industrialized where the plains states are rural and agricultural (I know that's not how the North/South is defined but it's a stark contrast). It really is silly that such a large swath of the US is thrown together in one group.
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Old 04-23-2018, 07:29 PM
 
Location: IN
20,846 posts, read 35,932,344 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Vegabern View Post
I'm sure it depends on your experience with the Midwest. I've lived in 3 Great Lakes states so that to me is the Midwest. The plains states feel totally different to me than WI, MI, and OH (the 3 Midwestern states I've lived in).


To me, the Midwest almost feels like a bit of a North/South thing. The Great Lakes states are industrialized where the plains states are rural and agricultural (I know that's not how the North/South is defined but it's a stark contrast). It really is silly that such a large swath of the US is thrown together in one group.
Low population density counties are very common in the Great Plains states, but not common in most of the Great Lakes states. There is a wide swath of "frontier counties" in the Great Plains states that have seven or fewer people per square mile. That is what the Census Bureau defines as "frontier counties."
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Old 04-23-2018, 08:01 PM
 
5,857 posts, read 14,043,096 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GraniteStater View Post
Low population density counties are very common in the Great Plains states, but not common in most of the Great Lakes states. There is a wide swath of "frontier counties" in the Great Plains states that have seven or fewer people per square mile. That is what the Census Bureau defines as "frontier counties."
At last count, Minnesota had 4 Frontier Counties.
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Old 04-23-2018, 11:27 PM
 
Location: OKIE-Ville
5,412 posts, read 7,704,410 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by danielj72 View Post
Oklahoma seems to fit more with Texas than anything, part southern, part southwestern but in my opinion not really like the midwest which has a definite northern culture component.
This one right here is correct in regards to Oklahoma.

Well done.
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Old 04-23-2018, 11:29 PM
 
Location: OKIE-Ville
5,412 posts, read 7,704,410 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by eddie gein View Post
This is probably the most accurate comment on the thread with two notable exceptions:

NW Oklahoma shares some commonality with the northern plains/midwest states in that almost all the people who came there originally were from there as well as Missouri. Furthermore, most of the early day prominent citizens of Oklahoma City, Tulsa and the other cities in the northern part of the state (Bartlesville, Stillwater, Ponca City, Enid, Guthrie) were from points north.

If you research street names from downtown OKC and Tulsa, virtually all of those streets were named after Yankees who moved to Oklahoma. (And this comment should tell you where the rest of us riff raff came from..

To the original question is tough because a bunch of states (like Oklahoma) have portions of them that would fit quite nicely in other adjacent regions.
Truth! Most of our folks in Oklahoma came from points South.
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