U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S.
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 04-18-2018, 07:36 AM
 
29,868 posts, read 27,324,185 times
Reputation: 18426

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by gladhands View Post
Baltimore. Great location, good urban bones, major port, strong university presence. Severely undervalued. Philadelphia is a close second, but I think Phlly is a lot closer to fulfilling its potential than Baltimore is.
I second this.

Also gotta mention Detroit.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 04-18-2018, 12:34 PM
 
6,954 posts, read 14,084,889 times
Reputation: 4533
Baltimore and Newark, NJ. Philadelphia is already well on its way to capitalizing on its potential. I still find it underrated, but it's doing much better now.

Baltimore and Newark are in great locations on the Bos-Wash corridor. Urban footprints with the potential for great walkability. Public transit systems already in place from subways to light rails to buses to their own Amtrak stations and their own airports. High quality higher educational institutions. Surrounded by very wealthy/educated suburbs and very near to a larger/more successful/more powerful major city that draws the wealthy/educated millennials away. Millennials want urban cities with good public transit. Baltimore and Newark both have that and they have universities either right in the city or very near to the city that have a brain drain to DC and NYC, respectively. They are both connected by public transit to the respectively larger/more successful city nearby. Newark is closer to NYC than Baltimore is to DC, but similar vibe. With DC and NYC becoming so expensive, and with both Baltimore and Newark in the early stages of their own resurgences, the spillover into these neighboring cities is inevitable if they can make the cities safer and attract businesses for the millennials to work at. I know a lot of millennials in the NNJ area are very interested in Newark right now, since Jersey City and Hoboken are so expensive, but Newark still has 24/7 heavy rail transit to Manhattan.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-18-2018, 12:45 PM
 
320 posts, read 360,742 times
Reputation: 399
Columbus- I see it transitioning from the little brother of Ohio to the top dog by then. Ohio will then have the trifecta of top dog cities. Cincy (1800's) Cleveland (1900's) Cbus (2000s).
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-18-2018, 12:50 PM
 
Location: Denver, CO
760 posts, read 588,107 times
Reputation: 1482
Detroit
Kansas City
Minneapolis
Cleveland/Columbus
Atlanta

Everyone keeps citing jobs and weather as a reason why the midwest/rustbelt will never come back...but eventually we will hit a tipping point. As traffic, COL, and water shortages affect the West, the "oh so awful midwest" will become extremely appealing. The tides of the job market can also rapidly change. All it would take would be a few big companies to relocate to a new city to ignite growth. I think back to how fast places like Denver, Portland, and Austin exploded during the 2011-2016 boom times. The same will probably happen again...only this time it will be to places that already have the infrastructure to handle rapid growth without rising COL.

My prediction is that the next recession cycle will change the trends. With how imbalanced the housing market is in the trendy/tech cities, a recession would cause all of those Millennial's barely hanging on to move back home where things are affordable. Right now, this generation is willing to do whatever it takes to live IN a trendy place...even if it means suffering in debt.

I also picked Atlanta because, well, it's Atlanta.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-18-2018, 12:55 PM
 
6,954 posts, read 14,084,889 times
Reputation: 4533
Quote:
Originally Posted by MN_Ski View Post
Detroit
Kansas City
Minneapolis
Cleveland/Columbus
Atlanta
I feel like Atlanta has already reached potential and just continues to capitalize on it. It's made it. But even like other cities that have made it (LA, SF, NYC, etc.), it will just continue to improve.

The problem I see with some of the Rust Belt cities is attracting the large industries back, as well as convincing young and educated millennials to move there. Minneapolis has a good chance. Detroit maybe. But KC is in a very conservative region of the country, and to the national eye, doesn't have anything special about it. Columbus will keep some OSU grads. Cleveland is an old legacy city that may draw some of those who left back to the city. The only midwest/Rust Belt cities I see standing a chance are Buffalo, Pittsburgh, Detroit, Cleveland, Columbus, Cincinnati and Minneapolis...maybe STL.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-18-2018, 01:46 PM
 
1,987 posts, read 1,234,516 times
Reputation: 2216
Quote:
Originally Posted by MN_Ski View Post
Detroit
Kansas City
Minneapolis
Cleveland/Columbus
Atlanta

Everyone keeps citing jobs and weather as a reason why the midwest/rustbelt will never come back...but eventually we will hit a tipping point. As traffic, COL, and water shortages affect the West, the "oh so awful midwest" will become extremely appealing. The tides of the job market can also rapidly change. All it would take would be a few big companies to relocate to a new city to ignite growth. I think back to how fast places like Denver, Portland, and Austin exploded during the 2011-2016 boom times. The same will probably happen again...only this time it will be to places that already have the infrastructure to handle rapid growth without rising COL.

My prediction is that the next recession cycle will change the trends. With how imbalanced the housing market is in the trendy/tech cities, a recession would cause all of those Millennial's barely hanging on to move back home where things are affordable. Right now, this generation is willing to do whatever it takes to live IN a trendy place...even if it means suffering in debt.

I also picked Atlanta because, well, it's Atlanta.
I'd also add Dallas with Atlanta
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-18-2018, 10:59 PM
 
13,560 posts, read 22,014,906 times
Reputation: 4587
Quote:
Originally Posted by MN_Ski View Post
...
Atlanta

...

I also picked Atlanta because, well, it's Atlanta.
Hehe...why?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-19-2018, 01:35 PM
 
Location: Illinois
988 posts, read 592,610 times
Reputation: 1091
Quote:
Originally Posted by Logicist027 View Post

Austin - Booming economy, creative energy, fun liberal utopia. It's the fastest growing major city in the US. Everyone is moving to Texas, and Austin has the fastest growth rate. So yeah, its going to get better.
Why does that make it better? Outrageous fast growth usually makes a city worse, IMHO.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-19-2018, 01:39 PM
 
Location: Illinois
988 posts, read 592,610 times
Reputation: 1091
Quote:
Originally Posted by MN_Ski View Post
Detroit
Kansas City
Minneapolis
Cleveland/Columbus
Atlanta

Everyone keeps citing jobs and weather as a reason why the midwest/rustbelt will never come back...but eventually we will hit a tipping point. As traffic, COL, and water shortages affect the West, the "oh so awful midwest" will become extremely appealing. The tides of the job market can also rapidly change. All it would take would be a few big companies to relocate to a new city to ignite growth. I think back to how fast places like Denver, Portland, and Austin exploded during the 2011-2016 boom times. The same will probably happen again...only this time it will be to places that already have the infrastructure to handle rapid growth without rising COL.

My prediction is that the next recession cycle will change the trends. With how imbalanced the housing market is in the trendy/tech cities, a recession would cause all of those Millennial's barely hanging on to move back home where things are affordable. Right now, this generation is willing to do whatever it takes to live IN a trendy place...even if it means suffering in debt.

I also picked Atlanta because, well, it's Atlanta.
Solid post. I've thought of this as well. Not sure MPLS will grow much though. Its weather will keep its size reasonable. The city is doing very well, no need to reach a higher potential.

Regarding ATL, I like it way more now than I did in the 90s. It's a full, dominant metro at this point.

The midwestern/rust belt cities that play their cards right will likely prove to be very desirable as the floods overflow in other places. It's already so much more affordable to get full city amenities in a place like Milwaukee vs a place like Seattle, which is so overpriced and jammed by traffic.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-19-2018, 02:05 PM
 
Location: Greater Boston (Formerly Orlando and New York)
510 posts, read 196,859 times
Reputation: 498
Atlanta is too sprawly for me.. not dense enough.
If price was not a concern, I would vote:

1. San Francisco (More for scenary, extremely high QOL, food, best weather)
2. Boston (More for QOL, politics, food, culture and the four season weather)
3. Miami Beach
4. Suburban Denver
5. North Of Chicago
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S.
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top