U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S.
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 04-20-2018, 12:28 PM
 
6,984 posts, read 14,110,665 times
Reputation: 4581

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by glamatomic View Post
Politically, St. Louis City is Blue, as is most of the County. Other areas of the Metro however lean right. So there's something for everyone.
This is where St. Louis falls short. It's blue in the city, but MO seems to have swung pretty far right recently. This will not attract the young, educated millennials required for a city to truly tap into its full potential. Without the young, single, educated people with disposable income, it's hard to really reach full potential. I wish MO was different, because KC and STL seem like amazing cities with very low COL and beautiful urban neighborhoods. But I won't subject myself to an oppressive conservative government when I don't need to.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 04-20-2018, 12:55 PM
 
Location: indianapolis.
300 posts, read 108,401 times
Reputation: 630
Indianapolis could get there eventually, maybe.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-20-2018, 12:57 PM
 
Location: Avondale, Chicago
14,423 posts, read 26,258,761 times
Reputation: 9459
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mutiny77 View Post
Also gotta mention Detroit.
If it wasn't so expensive to buy insurance or difficult to finance home improvements, more people would be setting up there.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-20-2018, 02:35 PM
 
Location: Pittsburgh
3,145 posts, read 2,832,710 times
Reputation: 2858
Ohio and the Midwest. Columbus and Indianapolis are cities to watch.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-21-2018, 11:39 AM
 
512 posts, read 377,745 times
Reputation: 444
A lot of people are knocking LA because its already a world class city. Well I would say that it still has lots of untapped potential. The main reason is because LA has been an ugly sprawl in the minds of many for a long time. That trend is now ending as LA has no choice but to get taller and nicer, there really is no more room to sprawl. So when LA adds lots of amenities like the ones mentioned before (metro rail extension, LA river, etc.) it will be a much better place. Places like SF and NYC, though are great, don't have that kind of untapped potential. If you like it now, it will be more or less the same in the future.

I did mention Austin and Raleigh though. Nice weather sunbelt towns that are smart and getting much growth.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-21-2018, 11:43 AM
 
2,565 posts, read 1,028,922 times
Reputation: 2004
Austin and Denver
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-21-2018, 04:15 PM
 
Location: Tampa - St. Louis
1,090 posts, read 1,629,812 times
Reputation: 1517
Quote:
Originally Posted by jessemh431 View Post
This is where St. Louis falls short. It's blue in the city, but MO seems to have swung pretty far right recently. This will not attract the young, educated millennials required for a city to truly tap into its full potential. Without the young, single, educated people with disposable income, it's hard to really reach full potential. I wish MO was different, because KC and STL seem like amazing cities with very low COL and beautiful urban neighborhoods. But I won't subject myself to an oppressive conservative government when I don't need to.
I completely agree with this. St. Louis metro actually is solidly blue, but whenever St. Louis tries to do something progressive the state is there in short order to pass a law to overturn it. What also hurts St. Louis is that a good portion of the metro area is in Illinois (just like Kansas City is partially in Kansas). This is a rather large urban block that would certainly change the dynamics of the state if it were it in Missouri's borders. It's absolutely insane, it's like Missouri actively suppresses its urban areas (particularly St. Louis), outstaters are very aware that a booming St. Louis and Kansas City would make Missouri a solidly blue state in rather short order.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-21-2018, 05:19 PM
 
Location: Downtown Phoenix, AZ
18,927 posts, read 6,893,625 times
Reputation: 5856
Quote:
Originally Posted by goat314 View Post
I completely agree with this. St. Louis metro actually is solidly blue, but whenever St. Louis tries to do something progressive the state is there in short order to pass a law to overturn it. What also hurts St. Louis is that a good portion of the metro area is in Illinois (just like Kansas City is partially in Kansas). This is a rather large urban block that would certainly change the dynamics of the state if it were it in Missouri's borders. It's absolutely insane, it's like Missouri actively suppresses its urban areas (particularly St. Louis), outstaters are very aware that a booming St. Louis and Kansas City would make Missouri a solidly blue state in rather short order.
Yeah I remember St Louis and Kansas City both passing higher minimum wages than the rest of Missouri, and then the state came in and undid it and brought both cities back to the state minimum. That was uncool
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-23-2018, 07:04 AM
 
6,984 posts, read 14,110,665 times
Reputation: 4581
Quote:
Originally Posted by goat314 View Post
I completely agree with this. St. Louis metro actually is solidly blue, but whenever St. Louis tries to do something progressive the state is there in short order to pass a law to overturn it. What also hurts St. Louis is that a good portion of the metro area is in Illinois (just like Kansas City is partially in Kansas). This is a rather large urban block that would certainly change the dynamics of the state if it were it in Missouri's borders. It's absolutely insane, it's like Missouri actively suppresses its urban areas (particularly St. Louis), outstaters are very aware that a booming St. Louis and Kansas City would make Missouri a solidly blue state in rather short order.
Quote:
Originally Posted by FirebirdCamaro1220 View Post
Yeah I remember St Louis and Kansas City both passing higher minimum wages than the rest of Missouri, and then the state came in and undid it and brought both cities back to the state minimum. That was uncool
That's really a problem with almost all conservative states right now. Cities continually try to progress, but their states continually suppress them. Same thing happens to Louisville all the time and it was one of my biggest complaints about living there.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-23-2018, 12:26 PM
 
Location: North Carolina
434 posts, read 250,403 times
Reputation: 653
Quote:
Originally Posted by Logicist027 View Post
That's right, what city has the most potential. What city 20 - 30 years from now will be much better. Consider all the common things that normally are compared.

COL, QOL, politics, weather, scenery, food, natural disasters, culture etc.
I'm going to forego the obvious ones, such as Austin, Charlotte, Nashville, and Raleigh, and instead focus on two cities that I think we'll be talking about in the same light in about 20 years.

Durham, NC - overshadowed by Raleigh, the Bull City boasts an amazing downtown filled with restored early 20th-century tobacco buildings, a world-class university, modern entertainment venues such as the Durham Bulls Athletic Park and Durham Performance Arts Center, and all sorts of dining options. High-paying jobs at the Research Triangle Park are nearby, and a light rail is coming soon. Durham's population has been increasing rapidly, as it will be nearing 300k residents by 2020 (up from ~228k in 2010). It will likely overtake Greensboro as the third-largest city in North Carolina by the early 2020s, although it is easy to make the argument that Durham has already become the #3 city in North Carolina behind Charlotte and nearby Raleigh.

Greenville, SC - another Southern city with an epic downtown, Greenville is growing rapidly. Numerous publications have named Greenville as one of the best small cities in the U.S. for both living and working, and the Reedy River has helped spark development on the south side of downtown. Demographics are a bit skewed due to South Carolina's annexation laws, but Greenville County has added around 127k residents since 2000 to bring the county's population to just over 500k people. Greenville is convenient to both Atlanta and Charlotte, and the mountains are just a short drive away as well. I would rank Greenville as the #3 city in South Carolina behind Charleston and Columbia.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S.
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top