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Old 04-19-2018, 10:02 PM
 
Location: Greenville SC 'Waterfall City'
7,583 posts, read 4,011,810 times
Reputation: 2926

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Charleston is popular in part because of its history. If you were a native of SC, you would not doubt that. Charleston has a big tourism industry based on its history.

Monomania is me not validating your opinions apparently. I'm not sure why you look at opinion forums if you are expecting to see only your opinion. That seems to be the mono approach, not mine.

I don't think you have provided any evidence that you know what a significant number of people think about SC. Why would a person in Alaska be talking to people about SC? As a SC native, I've had numerous opportunities to talk to people from outside of the state about SC. The reason that SC comes up in conversation is that I am from SC.

If you have some polling data on how people perceive SC, I would like to see it. I'm open minded on this. I think the tourism rankings that indicate that SC has the 7th or 8th most tourism is a type of poll on how people view it. There are also a ton of kids from outside of the south attending universities in SC. Why would they come down to SC for their college years if it is widely considered not cool.

Myrtle Beach in SC is one of the most visited beaches in the country. It isn't just people from the local area. I would not expect a person in Alaska to be familiar with it. Your premise appears to be if you are not familiar with beaches in SC, few people are.

Here is article in NY Post recommending Myrtle Beach as a top beach town for singles. https://nypost.com/2014/07/14/the-8-...s-for-singles/

Last edited by ClemVegas; 04-19-2018 at 11:31 PM..
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Old 04-19-2018, 11:58 PM
 
Location: Springfield, Ohio
12,201 posts, read 10,425,124 times
Reputation: 11220
SC is not "cool". If you're the only one saying it about your own state, that should be a huge red flag for you.

I live in Ohio and it's definitely not "cool" either, unless you're really into fast food, college sports and "Rust Belt chic".
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Old 04-20-2018, 12:06 AM
 
Location: Greenville SC 'Waterfall City'
7,583 posts, read 4,011,810 times
Reputation: 2926
Ok. Why do you think SC isn't cool? I note you did not provide any specific reasons which seems to be a trend.

Also, how do you know how other people view SC? You have talked to a significant number of people about what they think about SC?

I would say perhaps a person in SC has more insight into how SC is perceived than people in Ohio, Denver, Milwaukee, and Alaska.

The person in Alaska doesn't think there are many people who think SC has good beaches outside of the local area. This is despite me posting that SC was ranked the no. 7 tourism state and linking to the tourism rankings on this very thread. The beaches in SC are good enough that people travel to them.

I'm confident there are plenty of non-fast food restaurants in Ohio.

Last edited by ClemVegas; 04-20-2018 at 12:25 AM..
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Old 04-20-2018, 03:54 AM
sub
Status: "Feeling suspicious" (set 3 days ago)
 
794 posts, read 412,211 times
Reputation: 1369
It's not my cup of tea, but apparently a ton of people from all over the eastern half of the country think South Carolina is cool enough to put the palmetto and crescent emblem on the back windshields of their cars. It's one of the most common stickers I see.
Most people don't seem to think about the Confederate aspect of it anymore unless they're of a certain political persuasion that thinks a lot about race when others are trying to move on.
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Old 04-20-2018, 06:12 AM
 
Location: "The Dirty Irv" Irving, TX
2,808 posts, read 1,308,178 times
Reputation: 3211
Quote:
Originally Posted by ClemVegas View Post
Ok, so why do you think SC is considered uncool. Most people on here have not given any reason why they say SC is uncool despite having a very strong opinion about it. Why do you think a high tourism state with beaches is considered so uncool? When I said SC has a cool rep, I gave several reasons for it.

Also, how do you know how people around the country view SC? How many people have you talked to about Huntsville? I lived in Huntsville. It doesn't seem like a person in Texas who used to live in Idaho would be hearing people expressing opinions about SC and Huntsville much. I do agree Huntsville is less known than SC and other southern states on the Atlantic ocean but based on my experience people who are familiar with Huntsville tend to like it. Most of these people are engineers and Huntsville is a major engineering city in this country.

SC appears to be the no. 7 tourism state, it has a large number of retirees, there are tons of transplants moving to SC. I know firsthand Charleston, Hilton Head, and Myrtle Beach are loved by a lot of people. People talk up Charleston all the time on this forum. As I have pointed out, these coastal cities drive SC's reputation outside of the state. Charleston, Hilton Head, Greenville and other SC cities have made best places to live lists.

Much of Asheville's rep is simply based on it being in the mountains. It isn't about the city itself and I know a lot of people who are familiar with Asheville who don't think it is cool. I live 1 hour 20 minutes from Asheville. Most of the people who think the city is cool are liberal because it has a liberal rep. I agree Asheville is cool in terms of its location in the mountains.

So you don't think it is possible that conservative / non-liberal people might think various red states especially ones with beaches are cool? I know conservatives who have moved to SC because of its conservative rep.
No, I've only heard people talk about Huntsville a few times. I know it's involved or was involved with the space race. The fact that it isn't talked about as a cool place proves my point that it doesn't have a national rep for being cool. Regardless, I'm sure it's a nice place.

No, people in most of the country don't talk about SC all the time like they do for the more popular "Cool" states. You would think the fact that I'm not from the SE would help enforce that point to you.

Quote:
Originally Posted by ClemVegas View Post
Also, how do you know how people around the country view SC?
idk, maybe I'm "From around the country?"

Texas, New Jersey, and Nevada all have higher numbers of tourists than SC. None of them really have the reputation of being "Cool" states. Georgia is right behind SC in tourist numbers, ask most local Georgians, they will tell you they don't have a reputation as a "cool" state. According to some stats I saw Ohio had fairly high tourist numbers. Most native Ohioans won't claim they have a cool reputation.

Look, Asheville has a reputation for being cool. I know people from college who went there on spring break because of the reputation, none of them were from the South East. At least one of those people is now a staffer in DC right now for the GOP, and a couple of them interned at the Heritage Foundation. Conservatives can enjoy Asheville too lol

Thats like me getting POed that Portland is seen as more cool than Boise, it's silly.

I don't get why this bothers you so much. The OP was talking about "Coolest Reputations" not which ones you personally like of think SHOULD have a cool reputation.

I don't get why you have to get so weirdly political.

Yes, polls show there is some differences between what cities people want to visit based on their political views. I saw a study (that I can't find at the moment) that showed conservatives had a higher interest in visiting Nashville and liberals had a higher interest in visiting San Francisco relative to each other.

Even Glenn Beck takes issue with this whole way of thinking.

"There are two big problems: 1) conservatives get kind of screwed on the cool cities and relegated to suburbs and 2) this just reinforces the political division tearing the country apart."

New study picks the 10 best cities for liberals, conservatives, and centrists…and there’s a big problem – Glenn Beck

I'm sorry, but moving somewhere because it it more conservative or liberal doesn't automatically make it cooler. Utah, Idaho, and North Dakota are growing rapidly and the majority of the folks moving there are center, or to the right. None of those states have a rep for being super "cool."

I personally think Boise and SLC are pretty cool and both areas have alot to offer to people regardless of the political leanings, but nationally, they don't have the reputation of being super "cool." I doubt y'all down in SC talk about them much.
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Old 04-20-2018, 06:15 AM
 
Location: "The Dirty Irv" Irving, TX
2,808 posts, read 1,308,178 times
Reputation: 3211
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gaylord_Focker View Post
Didn't state an opinion on Charleston. I said I've heard it's special. Lots of states have beaches.
Thirty states have a coastline, twenty-three with an ocean coastline and eight with a Great Lakes coastline.
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Old 04-20-2018, 07:11 AM
Status: "Be yourself. What's the alternative?" (set 22 days ago)
 
8,704 posts, read 10,850,989 times
Reputation: 12767
Cool is such a relative term. Can't define it for other people.
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Old 04-20-2018, 07:16 AM
 
Location: Wonderland
44,897 posts, read 36,220,301 times
Reputation: 63553
What makes a place "cool" to someone is totally dependent on what that person likes and thinks is "cool." Sheeze.

What this 56 year old, married, homeowning, financially comfortable white grandmother driving a car she paid cash for thinks makes a place "cool" will be markedly different from what a single, 25 year old black guy with $50k of college loan debt, a car payment, and a small apartment furnished with Ikea furniture thinks is cool. And hey, though I've never been a black guy, and never borrowed money to go to college, I was a young 20s something single with debt, renting an apartment with two other girls, and dreaming of living in a contemporary penthouse in a major metro area, working as an interior designer while dating mysterious men (not man, men), going out with friends till 4 am on the weekends that I wasn't attending the theater (I mean live theater, not the movies). Let's just say that my priorities have changed drastically over the years.

Now what I think is cool is a place with a good international airport so that I can travel anywhere I like anytime I like (which thankfully is pretty often), a low cost of living so that I have extra money in my pocket for that travel, good food and restaurant options, a diverse vibe when it comes to ages, ethnic groups, etc., concerts whenever I want to go to them, and plenty of beautiful neighborhoods, lakes, etc. If I want to go to the beach, I book a flight. I don't have to LIVE on the beach. If I want to go to the mountains, I book a flight - I don't have to LIVE in the mountains. If I want the big city, I can either drive there easily or fly there easily. Then I can come home to a comfortable, quiet home and neighborhood and get together with friends for good meals, game nights, local concerts, etc.

See, when I was 25 years old, this would have sounded very staid and provincial to me, and I couldn't have imagined having enough money to be able to afford traveling and going and doing when I wanted to, with no big debt payments and other bills looming each month and cramping my style.

Things change. People change. Finances change. What's cool to one person is not cool to another person - or even cool to that same person ten years or twenty years or thirty years later. My gosh, that's common sense, isn't it?
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Old 04-20-2018, 07:33 AM
 
Location: Kent, UK/ Rhode Island, US
626 posts, read 576,122 times
Reputation: 711
Quote:
Originally Posted by KathrynAragon View Post
What makes a place "cool" to someone is totally dependent on what that person likes and thinks is "cool." Sheeze.

What this 56 year old, married, homeowning, financially comfortable white grandmother driving a car she paid cash for thinks makes a place "cool" will be markedly different from what a single, 25 year old black guy with $50k of college loan debt, a car payment, and a small apartment furnished with Ikea furniture thinks is cool. And hey, though I've never been a black guy, and never borrowed money to go to college, I was a young 20s something single with debt, renting an apartment with two other girls, and dreaming of living in a contemporary penthouse in a major metro area, working as an interior designer while dating mysterious men (not man, men), going out with friends till 4 am on the weekends that I wasn't attending the theater (I mean live theater, not the movies). Let's just say that my priorities have changed drastically over the years.

Now what I think is cool is a place with a good international airport so that I can travel anywhere I like anytime I like (which thankfully is pretty often), a low cost of living so that I have extra money in my pocket for that travel, good food and restaurant options, a diverse vibe when it comes to ages, ethnic groups, etc., concerts whenever I want to go to them, and plenty of beautiful neighborhoods, lakes, etc. If I want to go to the beach, I book a flight. I don't have to LIVE on the beach. If I want to go to the mountains, I book a flight - I don't have to LIVE in the mountains. If I want the big city, I can either drive there easily or fly there easily. Then I can come home to a comfortable, quiet home and neighborhood and get together with friends for good meals, game nights, local concerts, etc.

See, when I was 25 years old, this would have sounded very staid and provincial to me, and I couldn't have imagined having enough money to be able to afford traveling and going and doing when I wanted to, with no big debt payments and other bills looming each month and cramping my style.

Things change. People change. Finances change. What's cool to one person is not cool to another person - or even cool to that same person ten years or twenty years or thirty years later. My gosh, that's common sense, isn't it?
I think the issue is that cool is a vague term that has multiple definitions. You're obviously defining cool as good or nice. I believe OP was thinking cool as hip, trendy or fashionable. Y'know, what's in. Obviously that's also subjective, but I think with that definition you get what OPs mean, even if that cool place doesn't appeal to you or some others necessarily.
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Old 04-20-2018, 07:59 AM
 
Location: Wonderland
44,897 posts, read 36,220,301 times
Reputation: 63553
Quote:
Originally Posted by A.J240 View Post
I think the issue is that cool is a vague term that has multiple definitions. You're obviously defining cool as good or nice. I believe OP was thinking cool as hip, trendy or fashionable. Y'know, what's in. Obviously that's also subjective, but I think with that definition you get what OPs mean, even if that cool place doesn't appeal to you or some others necessarily.
Yes, but what's "in" or "trendy" or "fashionable" also varies by age, demographics, ethnicity, etc. For instance, among my circle of friends, certain clothing styles are "in" or "trendy" but my 35 year old daughter wouldn't be caught dead in them. And what my 35 year old daughter wears, my 15 year old granddaughter wouldn't be caught dead in.

And yet each of us is "in" and even "trendy" or "hip" among our peers. For instance, I'll give you an example - I let my hair do it's natural thing, and it's gray. Well, actually it's a mix of silver, blonde, and dark around the edges. It's cut in a cute, asymmetrical, and - dare I say it - 2018 style. Literally every time I go anywhere, I get compliments on my hair - from people around my age (and since I'm a Baby Boomer there are lots and lots of people around my age out there). Is my hair "trendy," or "in," or "hip?" Among my peers it definitely is. I've referred so many people to my (much younger than me) hairdresser that I have run out of her cards to give out several times. Apparently my hair appeals to a lot of people - but not necessarily people in their twenties or thirties. So what? That doesn't make it UNcool, or UNtrendy or UNhip just because some people in a different age group don't think it's cool or trendy or hip. Personally I don't care for some of the styles some other people wear - but that doesn't make THEM uncool, unhip, untrendy either.

Like I said, it's subjective.

People who are in their twenties and thirties need to realize that lots and lots of consumers and fellow citizens are out there who have their own ideas of what's cool, trendy, hip, in style, etc. Teens and twenties and thirties are not THE defining ages of what's cool.
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