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Old 04-20-2018, 12:15 PM
 
Location: Mars City
5,091 posts, read 2,136,536 times
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From what I've seen, living in extreme differences, small towns = slow, large cities = fast.
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Old 04-25-2018, 06:42 PM
 
Location: North Carolina
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As someone who experienced both lifestyles, living in a big city and living in a rural area. My life went by so fast in NYC, but so slow in NC because I'm not out as much as I use to. In NYC I can just walk around and ride the train where as here in rural NC I have to drive everywhere which I can't do because I don't have a car nor a license.
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Old 04-26-2018, 04:46 PM
 
Location: 'greater' Buffalo, NY
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TheTimidBlueBars View Post
When I went to college in a small Ohio town, after the first couple years while I was still getting used to the ins and outs of higher education, I was amazed how fast time went, since I'd pretty much been to all the restaurants, parks, and shops already and explored down every street. That was a definite contributing factor in telling me that I don't want to live in small towns.
This to me would translate to boredom, and when bored, time moves very slowly.
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Old 04-26-2018, 04:53 PM
 
Location: 'greater' Buffalo, NY
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ndcairngorm View Post
A 70 year old can have just as many new experiences as a 5 year old (provided his energy level will hold out) and therefore his year can seem just as exciting and interesting - and long. I maintain it's the novel-ness of the day that makes it seem long, as opposed to sitting and watching TV all day long, in which case we're all saying, "Is it lunchtime already? Where did the morning go?"
I think it's the other way around. But then, I get bored easily with watching TV--while watching, I'm constantly glancing at the clock, well aware of when half hour intervals or hour intervals have elapsed. You seem capable of being fully engrossed in TV to the point where you can lose entire mornings being swept up in it...I can't really relate to that. And I certainly watch my fair share of TV, it's just that I don't find a day of being hungover in front of the television to be one that moves particularly fast--unless I'm sleeping through most of it. But if you're truly so rapt in your TV-watching, then you can't really be 'bored' with it, however un-novel/non-novel of an activity it may be.
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