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Old 04-28-2018, 09:07 PM
 
Location: Downtown & Brooklyn!
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Quote:
Originally Posted by l1995 View Post
Oops I didn't catch the "East". In that case I agree that it blends into the Jefferson St area. But Bushwick as a whole seems way more ethnic and less gentrified compared to even East Williamsburg. Would you agree that is loses the extreme hipster vibe by the time you reach the Dekalb Ave stop?

Apparently a lot of people consider the entirety of East Williamsburg to be Bushwick. East Williamsburg is a real name, but I guess it never caught on with some people.
Yeah I would agree that the hipsterness does die down around the Dekalb L and the general area around that hospital, but once you get to where the M train is at Myrtle-Wyckoff, and especially farther down past there by the Halsey L, the hipsterness picks right back up again. Not just on the Bushwick/Brooklyn Side either, but over the border to that part of Ridgewood/Queens too. They’re becoming more alike lately. You can very easily get off the train at Halsey and cross over the Bushwick/Ridgewood border multiple times without realizing it. Especially if you go bar hopping in the area. It makes finding addresses in the area kind of difficult sometimes. Actually I think the L train crosses over into Queens for a little bit around Halsey before going back to the BK side but you won’t even realize it since it doesn’t have any actual stops in Queens though the Halsey stop is pretty much right on the border.

I don’t agree with all of East Williamsburg being Bushwick. It’s a very weird transition area and hard to define, but I wouldn’t call all of it Bushwick (maybe farther East by Montrose + Morgan but not Graham + Grand). I think Bushwick is just the neighborhood most people associate that area with. Apparently East Williamsburg used to be a much more commonly used name before the 2000s, but has died down a bit. I think it’s best described as a transition area between Greenpoint, Williamsburg, and Bushwick. If you google “East Williamsburg” and “Bushwick, Brooklyn” Google gives clear boundaries on the map that I think are the best I’ve ever seen. It’s very common to see maps of Brooklyn that include all of East Williamsburg with (regular) Williamsburg. I think that’s ridiculous in 2018.

So basically imo it’s an area where you’re not in Williamsburg anymore, but not quite in Bushwick yet either.
Quote:
Originally Posted by l1995 View Post
Even though people refer to Manhattan as "the city", that does not mean people don't think of the outer boroughs as being part of NYC.
Yes. It’s not quite the same thing as they were saying. “The city” is just a nickname for Manhattan south of Harlem that is a leftover historical term for the original boundaries of NYC. The only part of NYC that’s ever (unofficially) not considered a real part of the city is Staten Island. That would make a better comparison.
BK, BX, and QNS are still as “city” as it gets — especially the first 2. And Upper Manhattan too for that matter.
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Old 04-28-2018, 09:36 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by That_One_Guy View Post
Yeah I would agree that the hipsterness does die down around the Dekalb L and the general area around that hospital, but once you get to where the M train is at Myrtle-Wyckoff, and especially farther down past there by the Halsey L, the hipsterness picks right back up again. Not just on the Bushwick/Brooklyn Side either, but over the border to that part of Ridgewood/Queens too. They’re becoming more alike lately. You can very easily get off the train at Halsey and cross over the Bushwick/Ridgewood border multiple times without realizing it. Especially if you go bar hopping in the area. It makes finding addresses in the area kind of difficult sometimes. Actually I think the L train crosses over into Queens for a little bit around Halsey before going back to the BK side but you won’t even realize it since it doesn’t have any actual stops in Queens though the Halsey stop is pretty much right on the border.

I don’t agree with all of East Williamsburg being Bushwick. It’s a very weird transition area and hard to define, but I wouldn’t call all of it Bushwick (maybe farther East by Montrose + Morgan but not Graham + Grand). I think Bushwick is just the neighborhood most people associate that area with. Apparently East Williamsburg used to be a much more commonly used name before the 2000s, but has died down a bit. I think it’s best described as a transition area between Greenpoint, Williamsburg, and Bushwick. If you google “East Williamsburg” and “Bushwick, Brooklyn” Google gives clear boundaries on the map that I think are the best I’ve ever seen. It’s very common to see maps of Brooklyn that include all of East Williamsburg with (regular) Williamsburg. I think that’s ridiculous in 2018.

So basically imo it’s an area where you’re not in Williamsburg anymore, but not quite in Bushwick yet either.
Yes. It’s not quite the same thing as they were saying. “The city” is just a nickname for Manhattan south of Harlem that is a leftover historical term for the original boundaries of NYC. The only part of NYC that’s ever (unofficially) not considered a real part of the city is Staten Island. That would make a better comparison.
BK, BX, and QNS are still as “city” as it gets — especially the first 2. And Upper Manhattan too for that matter.
I wonder why the hipster pockets formed like that rather than a gradual West to East gradient? Maybe it's because the M train goes through white neighborhoods? Can you show me which streets in particular are the most hipstered out though? I did a quick street view of the locations you mentioned and they don't look Wyckoff and Starr level of gentrified to me.

Yeah the L train does go through Ridgewood a little bit according to Wikipedia.

Some people seem to think that East Williamsburg is a "fake" name, but to my understanding it existed before Williamsburg was even gentrified. I can see why people think that, but it's silly to write it off as not being real in my opinion. I have heard people refer to places on Grand St being Bushwick, but I agree that's too far West. Maybe some people think everything East of Bedford Ave is Bushwick lol.

Yeah, at least 3 of the outer boroughs have extremely urban areas, it's just that Manhattan is the most urban overall, and has the most CBD like qualities, which is probably why many (not all) people refer to it as "the city", rather than an implication that the outer boroughs are not NYC.
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Old 04-29-2018, 02:23 PM
 
Location: Alexandria, Commonwealth of Virginia
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The DC Diamond has a ton of variability:
  1. Adams Morgan: Grungy party spot
  2. American University Park-Tenleytown: AU student neighborhoods
  3. Anacostia: Historic black neighborhood
  4. Atlas District: Up-and-coming mid-tier shopping/residential area near Union Station
  5. Barracks Row: Historic strip famous for $$$ food
  6. Bloomingdale-LeDroit Park: Beautiful rowhouse residential neighborhood
  7. Bluemont-East Falls Church: Quiet suburban areas in outer Arlington
  8. Brookland: Catholic hub
  9. Capitol Hill: Government old money
  10. Cathedral Heights: Residential area famous for National Cathedral
  11. Chevy Chase-Shepherd Park-Colonial Village: Fancy, suburban neighborhoods
  12. Chinatown: Chinese-turned-entertainment district
  13. Columbia Heights: Hispanic hub
  14. Crystal City: Failed Pentagon City
  15. Dupont Circle: Older gay scene
  16. Foggy Bottom: University district full of diplomats
  17. Forest Hills-Rock Creek Park: Leafy, expensive mansions (home to the Hillwood Estate and its fancy faberge eggs)
  18. Georgetown: Wealthy, colonial commercial area famous for shopping
  19. Golden Triangle: Up-and-coming commercial hub centered on Farragut Square (the busiest metro stations)
  20. King Street-Old Town: Wealthy, colonial commercial area famous for restaurants
  21. Little Ethiopia: Unique culture
  22. Logan Circle: Younger gay scene
  23. Navy Yard-The Wharf: Sports-oriented entertainment district
  24. Noma: High density residential area near Union Station
  25. Orange Line Corridor: stretch of Arlington from Courthouse to Ballston famous for nightlife
  26. Pentagon City: Shopping district with high density housing
  27. Petworth: Gentrifying hub
  28. Queens Chapel-Fort Totten: Quiet suburban areas in outer DC
  29. Rosemont-Del Ray: homey, upper middle class neighborhood in Alexandria famous for shopping/cuisine
  30. Rosslyn: Mini-hattan
  31. Shaw: Old Black neighborhood gentrifying quickly and known for nightlife
  32. Takoma Park: Hippies
  33. Trinidad: Cheap black neighborhood full of good shopping
  34. U Street: Gentrified black neighborhood famous for food
  35. Wards Seven and Eight: Extremely poor black neighborhoods across the Anacostia River
  36. Woodley Park-Cleveland Park: Mid-tier neighborhood good for families
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Old 04-29-2018, 02:55 PM
 
Location: Downtown & Brooklyn!
2,123 posts, read 1,310,977 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by l1995 View Post
I wonder why the hipster pockets formed like that rather than a gradual West to East gradient? Maybe it's because the M train goes through white neighborhoods? Can you show me which streets in particular are the most hipstered out though? I did a quick street view of the locations you mentioned and they don't look Wyckoff and Starr level of gentrified to me.

Yeah the L train does go through Ridgewood a little bit according to Wikipedia.
I think it’s just a drop around the hospital since the hospital is right on top of the L train, but IDK. Compared to Jefferson the next stop over, Dekalb is definitely much calmer and “normal” lol.
Wyckoff continues out to Halsey too, and it's definitely where the main hipsterness is centered around there, and the streets branching off of it. Also some of the nearby parallel streets like Irving and Knickerbocker.
When I first started hanging out in Bushwick around 2014, Halsey L area is where I would go just because I had a lot of friends living here. Even as recent as then it was still kind of a sketchy area (but nothing compared to the 90s or 00s). It has gentrified a lot since then.
The nightlife scene around there is where you see most of the hipsterness, but there's also the Bushwick Collective street art around there similar to the Jefferson L, so you can find a lot of the same street artists.


https://www.google.com/maps/@40.6950...7i13312!8i6656

https://www.google.com/maps/@40.6995...7i13312!8i6656

And this place right by the subway (technically in Ridgewood, Queens) is a DIY Venue that doesn't look like much on the outside, but on the inside at night there are some crazy parties here sometimes but it's an extremely hipster crowd and it can vary on the night. It's a lot of fun though. There's a lot of other bars and venues around here too. A mix of Spanish bars, hipster bars, dives, and hipster dives.
https://www.google.com/maps/@40.6968...7i13312!8i6656

If you follow the M down from the L at Myrtle-Wyckoff it's still extremely hipster all the way down to Myrtle-Broadway. It's when you follow the M train North to Queens where it dies off and I'm not really sure why. I honestly think that part of it might just be the simple fact that it's a Queens address instead of a Brooklyn one.

Quote:
Some people seem to think that East Williamsburg is a "fake" name, but to my understanding it existed before Williamsburg was even gentrified. I can see why people think that, but it's silly to write it off as not being real in my opinion. I have heard people refer to places on Grand St being Bushwick, but I agree that's too far West. Maybe some people think everything East of Bedford Ave is Bushwick lol.

Yeah, at least 3 of the outer boroughs have extremely urban areas, it's just that Manhattan is the most urban overall, and has the most CBD like qualities, which is probably why many (not all) people refer to it as "the city", rather than an implication that the outer boroughs are not NYC.
Yes that’s exactly it!! People unfamiliar with the Williamsburg/Greenpoint/Bushwick area just think Williamsburg is only the Bedford L and everything else is Bushwick! I live a few blocks from the Williasmburg Bridge, down by the Marcy JMZ instead of up by the L train. So many times I've had people from other areas think that I live in East Williamsburg, Bed Stuy, or even Bushwick! It's even called the WILLIASMBURG bridge, yet I've had people from Manhattan, Queens, etc. try to tell me stuff like "No, that's Bed Stuy to me", like wtf it's not called the Bed Stuy Bridge!. And no it's not East Williasmburg either. How can it be East if I'm right next to Manhattan (literally walking distance over the bridge). If you go any farther West, you'll be in LES in Manhattan!

/rant over sorry! You wouldn't believe how many times I've heard that in the time I've been living here.

On East Williamsburg, a common misconception is that it is a fake name created by realtors to make the area more attractive after Williamsburg gentrified and became so expensive, but actually it's an older term that predates gentrification. This is true. I can see why people would assume it sounds kind of douchey and fake though. There is a pretty big change from Williamsburg to East Williamsburg. They are nowhere as alike as one would think just from the names alone.
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Old 04-29-2018, 04:04 PM
 
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Originally Posted by That_One_Guy View Post
I think it’s just a drop around the hospital since the hospital is right on top of the L train, but IDK. Compared to Jefferson the next stop over, Dekalb is definitely much calmer and “normal” lol.
Wyckoff continues out to Halsey too, and it's definitely where the main hipsterness is centered around there, and the streets branching off of it. Also some of the nearby parallel streets like Irving and Knickerbocker.
When I first started hanging out in Bushwick around 2014, Halsey L area is where I would go just because I had a lot of friends living here. Even as recent as then it was still kind of a sketchy area (but nothing compared to the 90s or 00s). It has gentrified a lot since then.
The nightlife scene around there is where you see most of the hipsterness, but there's also the Bushwick Collective street art around there similar to the Jefferson L, so you can find a lot of the same street artists.


https://www.google.com/maps/@40.6950...7i13312!8i6656

https://www.google.com/maps/@40.6995...7i13312!8i6656

And this place right by the subway (technically in Ridgewood, Queens) is a DIY Venue that doesn't look like much on the outside, but on the inside at night there are some crazy parties here sometimes but it's an extremely hipster crowd and it can vary on the night. It's a lot of fun though. There's a lot of other bars and venues around here too. A mix of Spanish bars, hipster bars, dives, and hipster dives.
https://www.google.com/maps/@40.6968...7i13312!8i6656

If you follow the M down from the L at Myrtle-Wyckoff it's still extremely hipster all the way down to Myrtle-Broadway. It's when you follow the M train North to Queens where it dies off and I'm not really sure why. I honestly think that part of it might just be the simple fact that it's a Queens address instead of a Brooklyn one.


Yes that’s exactly it!! People unfamiliar with the Williamsburg/Greenpoint/Bushwick area just think Williamsburg is only the Bedford L and everything else is Bushwick! I live a few blocks from the Williasmburg Bridge, down by the Marcy JMZ instead of up by the L train. So many times I've had people from other areas think that I live in East Williamsburg, Bed Stuy, or even Bushwick! It's even called the WILLIASMBURG bridge, yet I've had people from Manhattan, Queens, etc. try to tell me stuff like "No, that's Bed Stuy to me", like wtf it's not called the Bed Stuy Bridge!. And no it's not East Williasmburg either. How can it be East if I'm right next to Manhattan (literally walking distance over the bridge). If you go any farther West, you'll be in LES in Manhattan!

/rant over sorry! You wouldn't believe how many times I've heard that in the time I've been living here.

On East Williamsburg, a common misconception is that it is a fake name created by realtors to make the area more attractive after Williamsburg gentrified and became so expensive, but actually it's an older term that predates gentrification. This is true. I can see why people would assume it sounds kind of douchey and fake though. There is a pretty big change from Williamsburg to East Williamsburg. They are nowhere as alike as one would think just from the names alone.
I think I would have to actually walk around there to get a feel for how hipstered out it is.

I have seen hipster businesses and many hipsters walking around as far East as the Wilson Av stop, but I still think that area feels much less gentrified than the Jefferson St area. I still think the average suburbanite would feel uncomfortable walking around there. Would you say the areas you speak of are more like Jefferson St, Wilson Av, or somewhere in between?

As for Bushwick and Ridgewood, don't they have some noticeable differences such as building height and demographics? Such as Ridgewood having more 2 story buildings, and having more white people and less black people. Or do you have to go a little further into the neighborhood to notice these things?

People think you live in Bed Stuy? I'm shocked but at the same time not really because even a lot of native New Yorkers are terrible with NYC geography. I've heard of people thinking that Washington Heights is The Bronx.
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Old 04-30-2018, 06:25 PM
 
Location: Downtown & Brooklyn!
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Originally Posted by l1995 View Post
I think I would have to actually walk around there to get a feel for how hipstered out it is.

I have seen hipster businesses and many hipsters walking around as far East as the Wilson Av stop, but I still think that area feels much less gentrified than the Jefferson St area. I still think the average suburbanite would feel uncomfortable walking around there. Would you say the areas you speak of are more like Jefferson St, Wilson Av, or somewhere in between?

As for Bushwick and Ridgewood, don't they have some noticeable differences such as building height and demographics? Such as Ridgewood having more 2 story buildings, and having more white people and less black people. Or do you have to go a little further into the neighborhood to notice these things?

People think you live in Bed Stuy? I'm shocked but at the same time not really because even a lot of native New Yorkers are terrible with NYC geography. I've heard of people thinking that Washington Heights is The Bronx.
Have you never been to M train Bushwick before? The M train just finally reopened today so now it just got a whole lot easier to get there again! It’s a cool area. Still very hipstery but not as obnoxious as up by the L train. I’d say it’s more like Jefferson than it is to Wilson — but not up by House of Yes, I mean a few blocks down from the actual train station like by Maria Hernandez Park. Up and Down Myrtle avenue underneath the M train there are a lot of good bars and even one of my favorite clubs in the area.

I would definitely say that Halsey area has a lot more going on than Wilson and Bushwick-Aberdeen. I feel like the latter 2 are more about house parties. Kind of like a college party without the college/frat part. Halsey has The Bushwick Collective street art and a much more active bar scene.

I feel like the average suburbanite would be afraid of any gritty neighborhood! Even where I live in Williamsburg I’ve had suburbanites comment on the graffiti that covers my apartment and the el above it too! I’ve had people call my area “ghetto-looking” and “rundown” but whatever I don’t care lol. Some of my suburban friends (mostly NJ) can’t believe that I like it here better than my last place in Carroll Gardens. But it makes sense to all my NYC friends.

As for demographics, here’s the comparison (taken from City Data)
Bushwick:

Ridgewood:


They’re surprisingly similar. Ridgewood is a bit more white, and Bushwick a bit more black, but both are around 50% Hispanic with the other 50% being pretty diverse for the most part so overall I’d say they’re pretty similar here. I think that they are more similar by the L train than they are by the M train though, FWIW. Just from a general “feel” if that makes sense. As for building height, I’ve never noticed any huge differences. Neither are very well-known for highrises or anything but one difference I do notice is that a lot of the commercial streets in Ridgewood definitely do look more clean/polished than in Bushwick. Especially Myrtle Ave.

And yes I’ve had at least 3 different people tell me that I live in Bed Stuy. Trying to tell ME where I live like I’m the one that’s wrong!!! Lol
IIRC one guy from Astoria that told me “that’s not real Williamsburg by Bedford that’s Bedford-Stuyvesant or whatever”
Another from the upper west side told me “no that’s Bed Stuy to me”
And another was a friend of mine living in Harlem (but from New Zealand) asking me how I liked living in BedStuy because he was thinking of moving there. I gave him a pass though since he was from New Zealand he just probably didn’t know.

I think what happens is that people either confuse Marcy Ave station on the JMZ (which I commonly use to describe where I live) with Marcy Houses (made famous by Jay-Z). Or they confuse it with Myrtle-Broadway. Or maybe as you said they just don’t know the geography of other boroughs outside their own.

I’m not even counting the countless times I’ve been told Bushwick/East Williamsburg. Maybe they mean to say South? Idk.
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Old 05-01-2018, 12:06 AM
 
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Originally Posted by That_One_Guy View Post
Have you never been to M train Bushwick before? The M train just finally reopened today so now it just got a whole lot easier to get there again! It’s a cool area. Still very hipstery but not as obnoxious as up by the L train. I’d say it’s more like Jefferson than it is to Wilson — but not up by House of Yes, I mean a few blocks down from the actual train station like by Maria Hernandez Park. Up and Down Myrtle avenue underneath the M train there are a lot of good bars and even one of my favorite clubs in the area.

I would definitely say that Halsey area has a lot more going on than Wilson and Bushwick-Aberdeen. I feel like the latter 2 are more about house parties. Kind of like a college party without the college/frat part. Halsey has The Bushwick Collective street art and a much more active bar scene.

I feel like the average suburbanite would be afraid of any gritty neighborhood! Even where I live in Williamsburg I’ve had suburbanites comment on the graffiti that covers my apartment and the el above it too! I’ve had people call my area “ghetto-looking” and “rundown” but whatever I don’t care lol. Some of my suburban friends (mostly NJ) can’t believe that I like it here better than my last place in Carroll Gardens. But it makes sense to all my NYC friends.

As for demographics, here’s the comparison (taken from City Data)
Bushwick:

Ridgewood:


They’re surprisingly similar. Ridgewood is a bit more white, and Bushwick a bit more black, but both are around 50% Hispanic with the other 50% being pretty diverse for the most part so overall I’d say they’re pretty similar here. I think that they are more similar by the L train than they are by the M train though, FWIW. Just from a general “feel” if that makes sense. As for building height, I’ve never noticed any huge differences. Neither are very well-known for highrises or anything but one difference I do notice is that a lot of the commercial streets in Ridgewood definitely do look more clean/polished than in Bushwick. Especially Myrtle Ave.

And yes I’ve had at least 3 different people tell me that I live in Bed Stuy. Trying to tell ME where I live like I’m the one that’s wrong!!! Lol
IIRC one guy from Astoria that told me “that’s not real Williamsburg by Bedford that’s Bedford-Stuyvesant or whatever”
Another from the upper west side told me “no that’s Bed Stuy to me”
And another was a friend of mine living in Harlem (but from New Zealand) asking me how I liked living in BedStuy because he was thinking of moving there. I gave him a pass though since he was from New Zealand he just probably didn’t know.

I think what happens is that people either confuse Marcy Ave station on the JMZ (which I commonly use to describe where I live) with Marcy Houses (made famous by Jay-Z). Or they confuse it with Myrtle-Broadway. Or maybe as you said they just don’t know the geography of other boroughs outside their own.

I’m not even counting the countless times I’ve been told Bushwick/East Williamsburg. Maybe they mean to say South? Idk.
I have only been to M train Bushwick once, and it was only to go to my coworkers place to get picked up. He lives on Grove St between the J and the M. Compared to what I've seen in upper Bushwick, it had more black people and less hipsters. The area didn't seem very gentrified but was vibrant and pleasant, and there is even a community garden on his block.

Ans what you're saying reminds me of our conversation we had where we agreed that even the most hipstered out part of Bushwick still seems to have mostly ethnic businesses, which i think is cool.

Are you talking about Bossa Nova Civic Club? I do want to check that place out.

Yeah that makes sense, even though your neighborhood is super gentrified, I can see suburbanites thinking it's ghetto looking. I'm not even from NYC and I can totally see why you would prefer a neighborhood like that, as I prefer those neighborhoods myself over the swanky ones.

I would love to explore more of Bushwick. I'm moving to Brooklyn soon so I will get more chances to!

I do think there are some important demographic differences. The overwhelming majority of white people you see in Bushwick are not native to that neighborhood, while Ridgewood has more native whites. Even now I bet there are very, very white kids in Bushwick public schools.

True that neither neighborhood is known for high rises, but Bushwick seems to have more 3 story multifamily buildings compared to Ridgewood.

Plus Bushwick has a pretty large black population in my opinion, at least in the parts closer to Bed Stuy. I think people do consider it to be a "black and Latino" neighborhood a la East Harlem or Mott Haven rather than a straight up Latino one like western Sunset Park.

I can see people making that mistake because of the Marcy houses, but don't you live only a few blocks from the East River? I don't think anyone who is actually familiar with Brooklyn should mistake your neighborhood for Bed Stuy!
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Old 05-04-2018, 06:16 AM
 
Location: Downtown & Brooklyn!
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Originally Posted by l1995 View Post
I have only been to M train Bushwick once, and it was only to go to my coworkers place to get picked up. He lives on Grove St between the J and the M. Compared to what I've seen in upper Bushwick, it had more black people and less hipsters. The area didn't seem very gentrified but was vibrant and pleasant, and there is even a community garden on his block.

Ans what you're saying reminds me of our conversation we had where we agreed that even the most hipstered out part of Bushwick still seems to have mostly ethnic businesses, which i think is cool.

Are you talking about Bossa Nova Civic Club? I do want to check that place out.

Yeah that makes sense, even though your neighborhood is super gentrified, I can see suburbanites thinking it's ghetto looking. I'm not even from NYC and I can totally see why you would prefer a neighborhood like that, as I prefer those neighborhoods myself over the swanky ones.

I would love to explore more of Bushwick. I'm moving to Brooklyn soon so I will get more chances to!

I do think there are some important demographic differences. The overwhelming majority of white people you see in Bushwick are not native to that neighborhood, while Ridgewood has more native whites. Even now I bet there are very, very white kids in Bushwick public schools.

True that neither neighborhood is known for high rises, but Bushwick seems to have more 3 story multifamily buildings compared to Ridgewood.

Plus Bushwick has a pretty large black population in my opinion, at least in the parts closer to Bed Stuy. I think people do consider it to be a "black and Latino" neighborhood a la East Harlem or Mott Haven rather than a straight up Latino one like western Sunset Park.

I can see people making that mistake because of the Marcy houses, but don't you live only a few blocks from the East River? I don't think anyone who is actually familiar with Brooklyn should mistake your neighborhood for Bed Stuy!
Your description in the first paragraph sounds more like the area around the J/Z than the M to me, which can sometimes really be borderline BedStuy since the J train (Broadway) is the border between the 2. And yeah so it makes sense that’s where a lot of similarities come in. Similar to Bushwick/Ridgewood border on the opposite end of Bushwick by the Halsey L.

And yes I was talking about Bossa! It’s not anything like a megaclub like you’d find in Williamsburg or Meatpacking or whatever. It’s a bit smaller but has a decently sized dance floor and gets some really good crowds. And it’s very laid-back. I haven’t been there in a while — in part because of the M train shutdown.

Also yes I do live close to the river! Yeah that’s exactly what I’m saying!!

Congrats on the move!! Brooklyn is a good place to spend your 20s.
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Old 05-05-2018, 01:26 AM
 
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Originally Posted by That_One_Guy View Post
Your description in the first paragraph sounds more like the area around the J/Z than the M to me, which can sometimes really be borderline BedStuy since the J train (Broadway) is the border between the 2. And yeah so it makes sense that’s where a lot of similarities come in. Similar to Bushwick/Ridgewood border on the opposite end of Bushwick by the Halsey L.

And yes I was talking about Bossa! It’s not anything like a megaclub like you’d find in Williamsburg or Meatpacking or whatever. It’s a bit smaller but has a decently sized dance floor and gets some really good crowds. And it’s very laid-back. I haven’t been there in a while — in part because of the M train shutdown.

Also yes I do live close to the river! Yeah that’s exactly what I’m saying!!

Congrats on the move!! Brooklyn is a good place to spend your 20s.
He does live closer to the J, but still pretty close to the M train. But by that I mean the M tracks, not a station.

I've heard good things about Bossa, I should check it out soon. How would you describe the crowd, usual Bushwick hipster crowd?

Thank you! I'm gonna be staying with my grandmother in Kensington. I think it's a pretty good location since I can take the G to Williamsburg or the F to the LES. Getting to Bushwick will be a little more annoying but not a big hassle to me. I like the neighborhood a lot, even if it's not the most happening itself.

I do like where I currently live, but I decided to move in with my grandma since she's elderly and can use some help, plus I've been getting bored Nassau County and want to change things up.

Last edited by l1995; 05-05-2018 at 02:10 AM..
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Old 05-05-2018, 09:42 AM
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Location: Miami
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Originally Posted by eschaton View Post
There are basically four things which lead to distinct "neighborhood vibes" as opposed to a city seeming like one giant morass.

Distinct architecture: Older cities get points here, because building styles changed dramatically through the 19th and 20th centuries, and in general the older a neighborhood is the more likely it represents a distinctive local vernacular rather than just what was in fashion at the time. In contrast, starting in the streetcar era neighborhoods became a lot more samey, both nationally and within cities. Sometimes individual cities had dramatic shifts in architecture which can still be seen, such as when Boston shifted from building mostly brick to mostly wood-frame during the late 19th century.

Neighborhood business districts: It's hard for a neighborhood to have a distinct "sense of place" if it's just a collection of houses. Neighborhoods with strong identities have some sort of commercial business district which serves as the community focal point.

Topographic Barriers: Flat, sprawling cities don't really have clear boundaries to delineate where one neighborhood starts and another ends. Things like elevation changes, railroad tracks, rivers, and (unfortunately) major highways tend to cut off individual neighborhoods from their neighbors, making them feel more like tucked-away mini cities rather than just another part of a greater whole.

Demographic diversity: Even if neighborhoods are otherwise different, if they're all occupied by the same yuppies with the same yuppie stores, they don't seem as distinct. Divisions of people, rather than natural barriers, are in large part why distinct neighborhoods developed in say New York City, which has relatively few natural barriers.
Quote:
Originally Posted by btownboss4 View Post
Nothing annoys me more than cities claim to have an absurd amount of neighborhoods, unless it's the CBD you are not a neighbirhood unless there is at least a middle school, a church and a park and a village

A 7-11, a starbucks, a sub shop and an apartment building is not a neighborhood.
This eliminates a LOT of Sunbelt Cities (Charlotte, Raleigh, Tampa, Orlando, Nashville, Houston, etc.)
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