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Old 04-19-2018, 03:29 PM
 
Location: Zagreb, Croatia
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So, what major (or non-major actually) cities are the so called "neighborhood cities"?
Also, what cities feel the same everywhere you go?
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Old 04-19-2018, 03:39 PM
 
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New York definitely, some neighborhoods have an immediate change of vibe (like the Upper East Side vs East Harlem)
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Old 04-19-2018, 04:35 PM
 
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There are many. Chicago neighborhoods do change dramatically. Lakeview, Uptown, Chatham and Hyde Park.

St. Louis is another one. Not only do the neighborhoods change culturally also architecturally. Look at Central West End, Soulard and DogTown.
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Old 04-19-2018, 04:53 PM
 
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Boston certainly has distinct neighborhood so much so that it detracts from people feeling connection to the city as a whole. There are people from the outer regions that will say I'm going to Boston" if they are going to a destination between the South End/Backbay and the North End, and their definition of Boston excluded their own neighborhood that is within the political entity of Boston

I don't know any other city like that other than NYC that people will say "I'm going to the city" when they technically live in that same city they are referring to.
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Old 04-19-2018, 07:11 PM
 
Location: Denver
14,157 posts, read 19,820,750 times
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New Orleans too. Changes pretty quickly from the core to surrounding neighborhoods loke Tremé, Bywater, Holy Cross, Lower Garden District, out to Lakeview and the East which are clearly suburban to the gridded but less dense areas Uptown around Holly Grove.
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Old 04-19-2018, 07:27 PM
 
Location: BMORE!
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You'd be hard pressed to find a city with distinct neighborhoods bordering each other like you would in Baltimore.
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Old 04-20-2018, 01:59 AM
 
Location: Zagreb, Croatia
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So, it's mostly East Coast cities, huh?
How about Western cities, LA, SF, Seattle, Denver...?
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Old 04-20-2018, 06:20 AM
 
Location: Katy,Texas
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For me it’s simple. Business Districts, have the obvious massive skyscrapers changing often from low density or moderated density to glass behemoths really quickly.

Then ethnic neighborhoods also have a distinct difference like Chinatowns because of signs etcetera.
For me the biggest changes in the Houston area is in SW Houston.

Going from Westchase, to Chinatown, Harwin Drive to Mahatma Ghandhi district is a massive change of environment in just four bordering neighborhoods. Even then going to Gulfton passed Mahatma Ghandi district and further on to Bellaire and West University place you see the most impressive change in neighborhoods and thus while two or three of those neighborhoods are cookie cutter ish, because you went through the other areas it makes them look more unique.
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Old 04-20-2018, 06:50 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by l1995 View Post
New York definitely, some neighborhoods have an immediate change of vibe (like the Upper East Side vs East Harlem)
It’s a gradual transition though. While 99th St. is technically East Harlem, it’s virtually indistinguishable from UES. I do agree, however that New York has the greatest variation between neighborhoods… Sometimes even WITHIN a neighborhood. Forest Hills is a great example of a neighborhood with great variation.
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Old 04-20-2018, 06:53 AM
 
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Basically any city with a hyper urban core. They’re going to go from dense mid-rise or rowhouse neighborhoods to more suburban style neighborhoods on the outer edges of the city. Sunbelt cities tend to lack the dense inner neighborhoods, so there’s less variation.
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