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Old 04-23-2018, 06:56 AM
 
Location: New Jersey
941 posts, read 412,807 times
Reputation: 460

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https://e360.yale.edu/digest/a-north...global-warming

Read the article above. This is NOT a good thing, because the US is becoming more of a desert, which means people who have green and humid farm would have to move more east and condense. The Midwest has great soil and can produce a lot of food. For those of you who live in the western half of this country, you may be happy that humidity will die down in center of the country. I jumped when I saw this article saying to myself it's good that the US is getting better climate in the center of it, but I said to myself that we humans have really ruined the Earth and look what we did.
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Old 04-23-2018, 07:03 AM
 
Location: Kansas City, MISSOURI
9,013 posts, read 2,728,318 times
Reputation: 6945
Not good news for the KC area.
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Old 04-23-2018, 07:12 AM
 
Location: New Jersey
941 posts, read 412,807 times
Reputation: 460
Quote:
Originally Posted by James Bond 007 View Post
Not good news for the KC area.

You will definitely be affected, because all of Texas and Kansas will turn into a desert, instead of just the western half being a desert. Who knows if the climate boundary shift can affect inland Missouri.
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Old 04-23-2018, 02:46 PM
 
Location: Dallas, TX and wherever planes fly
1,558 posts, read 2,391,619 times
Reputation: 1394
This is actually totally believable. I'm in Dallas and the rate at which the state gets very very dry almost immediately after passing Forth Worth is crazy meanwhile areas an hour east of Dallas are significantly more moisture rich.
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Old 04-23-2018, 03:05 PM
 
Location: Bel Air, California
21,318 posts, read 21,872,221 times
Reputation: 33476
I bought a rain barrel so I should be OK
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Old 04-23-2018, 03:45 PM
 
Location: New Jersey
941 posts, read 412,807 times
Reputation: 460
Quote:
Originally Posted by Taynxtlvl View Post
This is actually totally believable. I'm in Dallas and the rate at which the state gets very very dry almost immediately after passing Forth Worth is crazy meanwhile areas an hour east of Dallas are significantly more moisture rich.
Does the state feel comfortably dry in your area since the humidity is dying away?
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Old 05-11-2018, 01:44 AM
 
Location: South Padre Island, TX
2,452 posts, read 1,277,997 times
Reputation: 1386
Nah, Texas will get more Hawaii-type weather if anything, especially the southern half of the state.
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Old 05-11-2018, 08:44 AM
 
40 posts, read 18,439 times
Reputation: 90
My suburb of Dallas averages a little over 40" of rain per year (more than Seattle annual rain fall). It's very humid here. July and August still ends up brown many years from high temps and little rain. The humidity definitely drops way down going west of Fort Worth. It will be interesting to see what happens in the future.
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Old 05-11-2018, 11:17 AM
 
Location: Atlanta, GA
425 posts, read 755,853 times
Reputation: 491
Quote:
Originally Posted by FranklinsTower18 View Post
My suburb of Dallas averages a little over 40" of rain per year (more than Seattle annual rain fall). It's very humid here. July and August still ends up brown many years from high temps and little rain. The humidity definitely drops way down going west of Fort Worth. It will be interesting to see what happens in the future.
I assumed the same, but in 2004 we had a very wet summer, and the native vegetation still turned brown. Then, in late August, everything turned green and flowered, like a second spring. I suspect that the particular species of native grasses in the DFW area turn brown no matter what as part of a defense against normal droughts.
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