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Old 04-26-2018, 09:35 AM
 
Location: Aurora, CO
6,557 posts, read 10,261,428 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cjseliga View Post
Really, I always used the term Intermountain West?

Intermountain West
This. Colorado, Utah, Wyoming, Montana, and parts of Nevada and Idaho are the Intermountain West. Washington, Oregon, and Western Idaho are the Pacific Northwest, and Arizona, New Mexico, and Southern Nevada are the Desert Southwest.
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Old 04-26-2018, 10:55 AM
 
Location: New Mexico
6,558 posts, read 3,656,219 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CookieSkoon View Post
Isn't it referred to as the inter-mountain west already?
Yes, it is.
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Old 04-26-2018, 10:58 AM
 
Location: Denver CO
21,164 posts, read 11,768,218 times
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I've heard plenty of people say Colorado is mid-west but as someone who has lived here for over a decade, I don't see that at all.

I personally call it Intermountain West or Mountain West or even just "the West" (although of course not the West Coast).

Presumably as population here continues to increase, it will become more generally recognized as its own region.
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Old 04-26-2018, 11:00 AM
 
Location: East of the Sun, West of the Moon
15,504 posts, read 17,724,856 times
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As a longtime resident of New Mexico, I have always thought that the Southwest was a sub-regional distinction of Mountain West.

New Mexico, Arizona, Colorado, Utah, Wyoming, Idaho, and Montana all have links and cultural ties that bind them to the exclusion of the West Coast and Midwest. A big part of it is that all of these states have not only physiographic similarities (Rocky Mts., Basin and Range), but a shared heritage of ranching and mining which saw a lot of population movement within the region.

In particular, there are cultural spheres that overlap between the states, for example, one incorporates northern New Mexico and southern Colorado. Another links northern Colorado with southern Wyoming, and western New Mexico with northeastern Arizona. There are others I am sure.

The Mountain West is a pretty tight group that largely looks out along a north-south axis rather than to adjacent regions to its east and west. In my experience people in NM and CO do not consider themselves from the "West Coast", almost bristling at the suggestion. I can only imagine how people from Wyoming would react to being culturally linked with the coast.
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Old 04-26-2018, 12:57 PM
Status: "Summer!" (set 16 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
86,990 posts, read 102,554,590 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by btownboss4 View Post
Because the West has much more of a homogenous heritage compared to the east.
Huh?

Quote:
Originally Posted by jupiter9 View Post
Mountain states are a sub region within the West.


Western states: California, Oregon, Washington, Alaska, Hawaii, Idaho, Utah, Arizona, Nevada, Wyoming, Colorado, and New Mexico. That's it.


I have never in my life heard people refer to Colorado, Arizona, or Utah as the Midwest.




The USA has a West vs Midwest, South, and Northeast divide that is apparent culturally and politically.
Some people claim that Denver (and presumably all of Colorado to the east) is "Midwestern". It is true that a lot of the housing has a midwestern style to it, but it's not quite the mono-culture of say, Omaha, where whole neighborhoods are the exact style of house. Here in the Denver suburbs, even the "entry-level" housing developments have 3-4 styles of home, e.g. bilevel, trilevel and ranch with several options for each style. Other than that, no, Denver isn't Midwestern any more than Pittsburgh, another city on the edge of the Midwest, is.

Quote:
Originally Posted by CookieSkoon View Post
Isn't it referred to as the inter-mountain west already?
Yes.
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Old 04-27-2018, 09:24 AM
 
Location: East of the Sun, West of the Moon
15,504 posts, read 17,724,856 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Katarina Witt View Post

Some people claim that Denver (and presumably all of Colorado to the east) is "Midwestern". It is true that a lot of the housing has a midwestern style to it, but it's not quite the mono-culture of say, Omaha, where whole neighborhoods are the exact style of house. Here in the Denver suburbs, even the "entry-level" housing developments have 3-4 styles of home, e.g. bilevel, trilevel and ranch with several options for each style. Other than that, no, Denver isn't Midwestern any more than Pittsburgh, another city on the edge of the Midwest, is.
Maybe it is just me, but I never considered architectural homogeneity as a hallmark of the Midwest. My experience in the Midwest is that there is far more diversity in architectural styles than the West, as a matter of fact.

In large part I think this is due to the fact that most Midwestern cities are older and have been through multiple phases of growth and incremental development rather than the master-planned residential developments that make up a large proportion of the housing stock in western cities.
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Old 04-27-2018, 10:06 AM
Status: "Summer!" (set 16 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
86,990 posts, read 102,554,590 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ABQConvict View Post
Maybe it is just me, but I never considered architectural homogeneity as a hallmark of the Midwest. My experience in the Midwest is that there is far more diversity in architectural styles than the West, as a matter of fact.

In large part I think this is due to the fact that most Midwestern cities are older and have been through multiple phases of growth and incremental development rather than the master-planned residential developments that make up a large proportion of the housing stock in western cities.
Maybe it is just you. Look at the bungalow neighborhoods in Chicago. Miles and miles of bungalows that all look the same. I've seen neighborhoods in Omaha as I've described. Unfortunately, I don't really know where I was, so I can't find them on a map. Look at these areas in Millard, NE off S. 180th St. Even the rooftops look very similar. Neighborhoods generally get built up at a similar point in time, sometimes by just one developer. Also, I was talking about the style of houses. You don't see the Spanish-styled houses in the midwest that you see in CA. Denver's home styles are more predominantly the midwestern-ish type.
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Old 04-27-2018, 10:09 AM
 
Location: Brackenwood
3,357 posts, read 1,326,301 times
Reputation: 6688
Quote:
Originally Posted by mwalker96 View Post
Generally when people talk about reigons of the US it is NorthEast, South, Midwest and West Coast. When people talk about states like Colorado, Arizona or Utah they usually say Midwest or West Coast. Why is that?
Arizona is often categorized as being part of the Southwest. Colorado and Utah are often described as being part of the interior West. I've never in my life heard of anyone classifying any of these states as "Midwest."
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Old 04-27-2018, 10:18 AM
Status: "Summer!" (set 16 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
86,990 posts, read 102,554,590 times
Reputation: 33058
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bitey View Post
Arizona is often categorized as being part of the Southwest. Colorado and Utah are often described as being part of the interior West. I've never in my life heard of anyone classifying any of these states as "Midwest."
Why do some people think Colorado is in the Midwest?
"Yelp", "SkyscraperPage" and "Reddit" also have threads about "Is Denver the Midwest?" You can also find stuff about Wyoming being the Midwest on the same forums.
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Old 04-27-2018, 10:25 AM
 
Location: Prescott Valley, AZ
2,694 posts, read 2,344,569 times
Reputation: 2709
I think it has something to do with the area not having large enough population and covering large part of the country. The mountains states includes areas such as the Southwest (Arizona, New Mexico and southern Nevada), parts of the Pacific Northwest (excluding western Oregon and Washington) Idaho, Montana, Wyoming, Colorado and Utah are Intermountain West. The sub region cultures make them unique.
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