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Old 05-20-2018, 11:49 PM
 
Location: Round Rock, TX
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Neither been to either state. But knowing how both states have a ton of landscape, Colorado even in its most urban parts is not that urban-looking.
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Old 05-21-2018, 02:08 AM
 
Location: Bellingham, WA
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Weird question, maybe Wyoming is a more rural Colorado? I kid, both states do have a variety of different landscapes and outside of the Front Range most of CO is sparsely populated, too. There aren't many big cities, obviously, but Downtown Denver and the areas/neighborhoods immediately surrounding it are about as urban-looking as anything I've experienced in Texas or most major cities around the country. It's certainly not NYC or a northeastern city or SF- and the dense, built up area is relatively small, but I'd say that much of the aesthetic and feel of central Denver is urban grit and industrial in nature.

It would take too long to list a bunch of places, but just a quick Google search immediately yields plenty of results...

https://www.google.com/search?biw=16...8lVWG_c4YRZyM:

https://www.google.com/maps/@39.7458...7i16384!8i8192

Last edited by bartonizer; 05-21-2018 at 02:41 AM..
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Old 05-21-2018, 04:31 AM
 
Location: Denver, Colorado
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Any rural area of almost every Western state is like Wyoming.. Heck, you can drive all over Oregon and think you are in Wyoming or Montana until you hit the Willamette Valley. Driving through most of the Oregon Coast you would think you are in rural Appalachian Tennessee or Georgia.

Colorado is not unique in that the rural areas are pretty reminiscent of other rural areas in Western states. Since Wyoming and Montana are primarily rural states, most of those states would resemble the less populated areas of Colorado, New Mexico, Oregon, Washington, Nevada and Idaho.

I can even throw Northern California into the mix once you get above Sacramento. Far northern California has more in common with Wyoming than Los Angeles or San Francisco.
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Old 05-21-2018, 06:46 AM
 
Location: Washington Park, Denver
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Are you asking specifically about the geography? Even there they are not the same.

Colorado is more mountainous than Wyoming. We are further south so areas of similar elevation are not typically as cold. Of the 96 14,000 foot peaks in the US, Colorado has 53, Alaska has 29, Wyoming has 0.

Colorado’s far west is a desert landscape that doesn’t really exist in Wyoming.

If you want to look to the variety in Colorado, just look to the differences between our four National Parks: Rocky Mountain, Great Sand Dunes, Black Canyon of the Gunnison, and Mesa Verde. They are all very different. They are also quite different than Yellowstone and Teton.

As for Colorado “not being that urban”, it’s quite urban in Denver. The population density Denver is higher than Houston and Dallas, but very similar. One of the misconceptions about the west is that it doesn’t have high population density. The opposite is actually true. Our remote areas are remote, but the areas where people actually live are dense.

Culturally speaking, The Front Range (where most of our population is located) is not even close to the conservatism in Wyoming.

Last edited by SkyDog77; 05-21-2018 at 07:31 AM..
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Old 05-21-2018, 07:51 AM
 
Location: Kansas City, MISSOURI
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Wyoming tends to be quite a bit colder than Colorado, in part due to its elevation averaging quite a bit higher, plus its a little farther north.
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Old 05-21-2018, 08:03 AM
 
Location: Colorado Springs
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In a word, no. Colorado contains a third of all the land in the entire nation that is over 10,000' in elevation. CO mean elevation is 6800 where WY is 6700. The elevation span in CO is 11,123 while in WY it is 10,709. While WY has tremendous mountain ranges, overall its elevation and range of elevation is much lower. While the population of CO is significantly greater than that of Wyoming, 70% of CO's population is along the I-25 corridor. That means the population centers in CO do tend to be much more urban and suburban than anything found in WY, but, because they have room to grow out, do not tend to go up as much as other places. Although downtown Denver does have a fairly urban feel to it, just with a pretty stellar backdrop.
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Old 05-21-2018, 08:41 AM
 
Location: Downtown Phoenix, AZ
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SkyDog77 View Post
Are you asking specifically about the geography? Even there they are not the same.

Colorado is more mountainous than Wyoming. We are further south so areas of similar elevation are not typically as cold. Of the 96 14,000 foot peaks in the US, Colorado has 53, Alaska has 29, Wyoming has 0.

Colorado’s far west is a desert landscape that doesn’t really exist in Wyoming.

If you want to look to the variety in Colorado, just look to the differences between our four National Parks: Rocky Mountain, Great Sand Dunes, Black Canyon of the Gunnison, and Mesa Verde. They are all very different. They are also quite different than Yellowstone and Teton.

As for Colorado “not being that urban”, it’s quite urban in Denver. The population density Denver is higher than Houston and Dallas, but very similar. One of the misconceptions about the west is that it doesn’t have high population density. The opposite is actually true. Our remote areas are remote, but the areas where people actually live are dense.

Culturally speaking, The Front Range (where most of our population is located) is not even close to the conservatism in Wyoming.
There is definitely desert in southwestern Wyoming, most notably around Rock Springs. I used to have to drive through Wyoming regularly when I drove OTR
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Old 05-21-2018, 10:33 AM
 
Location: Washington Park, Denver
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Quote:
Originally Posted by FirebirdCamaro1220 View Post
There is definitely desert in southwestern Wyoming, most notably around Rock Springs. I used to have to drive through Wyoming regularly when I drove OTR
I’ve driven through there before on the way to SLC. It has a different look than further south near Moab.
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Old 05-21-2018, 10:35 AM
 
Location: Washington Park, Denver
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Quote:
Originally Posted by James Bond 007 View Post
Wyoming tends to be quite a bit colder than Colorado, in part due to its elevation averaging quite a bit higher, plus its a little farther north.
Colorado has a higher average elevation. Not sure what you mean by this. Can you help me understand?

Wyoming is colder mostly because it’s further north.

Last edited by SkyDog77; 05-21-2018 at 10:46 AM..
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Old 05-21-2018, 10:44 AM
 
Location: USA
17,709 posts, read 8,863,537 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SkyDog77 View Post
Are you asking specifically about the geography? Even there they are not the same.

Colorado is more mountainous than Wyoming. We are further south so areas of similar elevation are not typically as cold. Of the 96 14,000 foot peaks in the US, Colorado has 53, Alaska has 29, Wyoming has 0.

Colorado’s far west is a desert landscape that doesn’t really exist in Wyoming.

If you want to look to the variety in Colorado, just look to the differences between our four National Parks: Rocky Mountain, Great Sand Dunes, Black Canyon of the Gunnison, and Mesa Verde. They are all very different. They are also quite different than Yellowstone and Teton.

As for Colorado “not being that urban”, it’s quite urban in Denver. The population density Denver is higher than Houston and Dallas, but very similar. One of the misconceptions about the west is that it doesn’t have high population density. The opposite is actually true. Our remote areas are remote, but the areas where people actually live are dense.

Culturally speaking, The Front Range (where most of our population is located) is not even close to the conservatism in Wyoming.
Good info. They are very different states that have SOME similarities in geography. Colorado is much more urban along the I-25 corridor, but less elsewhere. Wyoming is hardly urban at all expect a bit around Cheyenne which is also along the I-25 corridor.

However, for those looking for a less Progressive, less populated, lower cost alternative to "western" living, Wyoming may be a good choice over Colorado considering where the Front Range has been going the past three, or more decades.
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