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Old 07-18-2018, 06:23 PM
 
Location: North Caroline
267 posts, read 134,492 times
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How does the vegetation generally differ between various major cities in the South? I read in another thread that Nashville, for example, contains a lot of hardwood-type trees, as opposed to, say, Jackson, MS which would be very pine-heavy. Raleigh seems to contain a good mixture of both. Would this be accurate for a simple assessment? And what about other cities such as Louisville, Richmond, Charlotte, Atlanta, Birmingham, Jacksonville (FL), etc? Feel free to comment on other cities that may be smaller in size, too.

And can one generally say that as one progresses from more inland regions to the piedmont and coastal plain and then to the coast itself, the dominant type of tree generally progresses from hardwoods to pines to trees such as palmettos and live oaks that are generally found in close proximity to or more-or-less exclusively along the coast?
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Old 07-18-2018, 06:47 PM
 
Location: Kansas City, MISSOURI
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Yes, there are different forest types in the South. Here's a (partial) map:
http://www.lib.berkeley.edu/EART/tour/forest.gif
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Old 07-18-2018, 07:28 PM
 
Location: St Simons Island, GA
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Very generally, you have the forests in the coastal plain dominated by Live Oak and Longleaf Pine, the Piedmont region dominated by red and white oak and Loblolly Pine and the Upper South introducing more hickory and some cedar.
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Old 07-18-2018, 09:36 PM
 
Location: North Caroline
267 posts, read 134,492 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Iconographer View Post
Very generally, you have the forests in the coastal plain dominated by Live Oak and Longleaf Pine, the Piedmont region dominated by red and white oak and Loblolly Pine and the Upper South introducing more hickory and some cedar.
Great answer, thanks
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Old 07-18-2018, 09:40 PM
 
Location: North Caroline
267 posts, read 134,492 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by James Bond 007 View Post
Yes, there are different forest types in the South. Here's a (partial) map:
http://www.lib.berkeley.edu/EART/tour/forest.gif
Very informative map, thank you. Do you by chance have the Western part as well?
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Old 07-19-2018, 07:10 AM
 
Location: Kansas City, MISSOURI
9,013 posts, read 2,758,090 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TarHeelTerritory View Post
Very informative map, thank you. Do you by chance have the Western part as well?
Do a Google search for "US forest types map" and you'll get a variety of links. The US Forest Service has some PDFs of US forest types, that happened to be one that had a detailed zoom-in of parts of the South.

Generally speaking, in the South, the farther away from the coasts you get, the fewer pine trees and the more deciduous trees you have.
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Old 07-19-2018, 10:29 AM
 
Location: Austin,TX
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Here's an interesting map that shows the forest types in the eastern U.S. in the recent past and the projected types in a warmer future. https://www3.epa.gov/climatechange/i...ypes-large.jpg
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Old 07-19-2018, 05:43 PM
 
908 posts, read 771,090 times
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The future looks boring
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Old 07-19-2018, 09:24 PM
 
Location: North Caroline
267 posts, read 134,492 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by spencer114 View Post
The future looks boring
Indeed. Time to start planting trees?
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Old 07-19-2018, 09:46 PM
 
Location: Lake Spivey, Georgia
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The Atlanta area is naturally a dense deciduous forest. Hence we still have a fairly dense deciduous tree canopy: oaks (white and red), poplars, sweat gum, and hickories are all native to our area.
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