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View Poll Results: Hardest state to regionally classify?
Missouri 21 17.80%
West Virginia 34 28.81%
Virginia 7 5.93%
Maryland 14 11.86%
Pennsylvania 5 4.24%
Oklahoma 32 27.12%
New York 4 3.39%
Kentucky 6 5.08%
Deleware 7 5.93%
Texas 35 29.66%
Ohio 7 5.93%
Other (specify) 1 0.85%
Multiple Choice Poll. Voters: 118. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 07-24-2018, 09:55 PM
 
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For example, everyone knows Alabama is the deep south, everyone knows New Hampshire is the north-east, everyone knows Wisconsin is the upper mid-west, everyone knows Utah is the mountain west. I'm looking for a state that can't really be classified into any single regional category. Wondering which is the hardest
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Old 07-24-2018, 10:05 PM
 
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Its Texas for me and i live in Texas.........it has parts that look Southern,Midwestern/Plains, and Southwestern and other things possibly.
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Old 07-24-2018, 10:24 PM
 
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Which lower 48 state(s) is/are hardest to regionally classify?

West Virginia, Oklahoma, Texas.
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Old 07-24-2018, 10:27 PM
 
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The American South
Georgia
South Carolina
Alabama
Mississippi
Tennessee
North Carolina
Louisiana
Arkansas (including Missouri south of U.S. Route 60)
Kentucky (minus Cincinnati suburbs, including Missouri Bootheel))
North Florida (north of Orlando)
South Virginia (from just north of Charlottesville on southward, including most of Shenandoah Valley and the part of West Virginia south of Charleston)

Capital of The American South: Atlanta

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/U.S._Route_60#Missouri
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Missouri_Bootheel
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Missis...unty,_Missouri
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Scott_County,_Missouri
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stoddard_County,_Missouri
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cairo,_Illinois
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/North_Florida
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Daytona_Beach,_Florida
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Southern_West_Virginia




The Deep South
South Carolina
Alabama
Mississippi
Louisiana
Georgia
North Florida
West Tennessee
The Arkansas Delta
The Azalea Coast of North Carolina

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Deep_South
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/West_Tennessee
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Arkansas_Delta
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cape_Fear_(region)
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Old 07-24-2018, 11:17 PM
 
Location: Silicon Valley
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For me, it's Texas. It's not the south, not the west...it's it's own category in my mind.
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Old 07-24-2018, 11:21 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NoMoreSnowForMe View Post
For me, it's Texas. It's not the south, not the west...it's it's own category in my mind.
Yessir—most def.
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Old 07-25-2018, 01:29 AM
 
Location: Texas
209 posts, read 69,925 times
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Oklahoma and Texas.
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Old 07-25-2018, 02:10 AM
 
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While I recognize that border states are where neighboring regional cultures meet and blend to some degree, in my mind your state is more Southern than not if it seceded and should overall be classified as Southern. Furthermore, when this topic comes up, while I do hear/read many sentiments of Texas being its own region, I can't recall a time when someone has argued that it's actually a Western or Midwestern state; when assigning it to one region, people have always put it in the South in my experiences.

My top two are Oklahoma and West Virginia. After that, I'll probably go with Maryland and Delaware.
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Old 07-25-2018, 04:50 AM
 
Location: Chicago, IL
2,380 posts, read 1,216,621 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by aries4118 View Post
The American South
Georgia
South Carolina
Alabama
Mississippi
Tennessee
North Carolina
Louisiana
Arkansas (including Missouri south of U.S. Route 60)
Kentucky (minus Cincinnati suburbs, including Missouri Bootheel))
North Florida (north of Orlando)
South Virginia (from just north of Charlottesville on southward, including most of Shenandoah Valley and the part of West Virginia south of Charleston)

Capital of The American South: Atlanta

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/U.S._Route_60#Missouri
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Missouri_Bootheel
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Missis...unty,_Missouri
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Scott_County,_Missouri
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stoddard_County,_Missouri
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cairo,_Illinois
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/North_Florida
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Daytona_Beach,_Florida
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Southern_West_Virginia




The Deep South
South Carolina
Alabama
Mississippi
Louisiana
Georgia
North Florida
West Tennessee
The Arkansas Delta
The Azalea Coast of North Carolina

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Deep_South
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/West_Tennessee
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Arkansas_Delta
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cape_Fear_(region)
All these definitions, yet you didn’t list the official US definition of the South via the US Census:

Delaware
Maryland
DC
Virginia
West Virginia
North Carolina
South Carolina
Alabama
Kentucky
Tennessee
Mississippi
Arkansas
Louisiana
Oklahoma
Texas

https://www2.census.gov/geo/pdfs/map.../us_regdiv.pdf

Here is the Wikipedia page of the South that lists the same states:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Southern_United_States

In that list Texas (Oklahoma to an extent too) is definitely a Western state in my mind. The biggest outlier in the list. They had Cowboys, Ranchers, Spanish/Mexican influence. A history completely different from the rest of the south.

Maryland/DC have always been classified as Southern, and Maryland still is very southern in much of the the state land-wise, however, the major population core (Baltimore-Washington corridor), has become so populous and developed/suburban that it doesn't feel characteristically southern, so mid Atlantic is more commonly used.

Delaware is hard to define because it's a tiny state, and the most populous part of the state is part of metro Philly, yet it is technically southern.

So Texas, Oklahoma, and Delaware get my vote as hardest to define.

Last edited by personone; 07-25-2018 at 05:25 AM..
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Old 07-25-2018, 05:23 AM
 
Location: Terramaria
663 posts, read 723,271 times
Reputation: 778
Quote:
Originally Posted by personone View Post
You forgot the Federal Government's Official Definition of the South via the US Census:

Delaware
Maryland
DC
Virginia
West Virginia
North Carolina
South Carolina
Alabama
Kentucky
Tennessee
Mississippi
Arkansas
Louisiana
Oklahoma
Texas

https://www2.census.gov/geo/pdfs/map.../us_regdiv.pdf

Here is the Wikipedia page of the South that lists the same states:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Southern_United_States

In that list Texas (Oklahoma to an extent too) is definitely Western states in my mind. The biggest outlier in the list. They had Cowboys, Ranchers, Spanish/Mexican influence. A history completely different from the rest of the south.

Maryland/DC have always been classified as Southern, and Maryland still is very southern in much of the the state land-wise, however, the major population core (Baltimore-Washington corridor), has become so populous and developed/suburban that it doesn't feel characteristically southern, so mid Atlantic is more commonly used.

Delaware is hard to define because it's a tiny state, and the most populous part of the state is part of metro Philly, yet it is technically southern.

So Texas, Oklahoma, and Delaware get my vote as hardest to define.
I'd say El Paso and the rest of Trans-Peco Texas is much more separated from the south than Wilmington, Delaware is, since at least the later has a humid subtropical climate and is a fall line city like Macon or Augusta, GA are, but with a built form and demographics that resemble northeastern cities. Then again, it's landform isn't much different from most of NJ south of I-95, which arguably shows the "southern influences" in the Garden State away from the development.

El Paso meanwhile by far has fewer of these, and let's not forget the Mexican influence as well of which only the Rio Grande region of Texas can compare. That said, the majority of Texas's population reside in a portion that is a least lightly southern, and the eastern third isn't much different than the rest of the Deep South. It even has Mountain West elements as the city is west of Denver and has foothills that form the great Rockies. But its only a small part of the state, and Texas is "southern" in the purest sense geographically.

I voted for West Virginia though. It has the coolest climate out of all the Southern states (with winters surprisingly long in many places), extends the furthest north, and like Kentucky (which oddly hasn't received any votes) has sizable midwestern influences. The built form of its cities most resembles the western half of Pennsylvania, with little sprawl and compact city form hidden around hills. That said, it was originally part of Virginia, which itself is outright southern despite some contemporary developments and culture that have little in common with its prior history. Its more or less "the south" without much of the accent within the crescent. Still, calling MD/WV/DC/VA/DE the south is like rotating a compass 90 degrees, or saying that the Koreas are in South Asia, Ukraine is in Southern Europe, or that Kenya is in southern Africa.
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