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Old 10-02-2018, 02:24 PM
 
512 posts, read 376,661 times
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So here is a question, where would you bet on to improve the most? Which areas of the country? I mean megaregions, states & metropolitan areas for comparison. Let's use by 2048 as the extent of the crystal ball and try to look into the future. You can use all of the basic metrics you would use anywhere else. QOL, downtowns, socially, jobs, COL, environment, politically etc.

Some ways that you could go at this question:

Where would you invest if you could?
Where would you live and expect things to get better?
Where would you tell someone to go if they are in the middle class and trying to get a better life?
Where will societal problems be tackled the most?

Last edited by Logicist027; 10-02-2018 at 03:45 PM..
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Old 10-02-2018, 02:35 PM
 
Location: Brew City
4,214 posts, read 2,501,359 times
Reputation: 5649
Eleven years is not much time. I don't see any region changing that drastically in little over a decade.

I'll be a homer and say over a longer time period I see a Rust Belt revival. We have great bones, we're largely insulated from natural disasters (floods can strike almost anywhere), we have the largest supply of fresh water in the world, and the COL is already quite low attracting younger generations.
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Old 10-02-2018, 03:45 PM
 
512 posts, read 376,661 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Vegabern View Post
Eleven years is not much time. I don't see any region changing that drastically in little over a decade.

I'll be a homer and say over a longer time period I see a Rust Belt revival. We have great bones, we're largely insulated from natural disasters (floods can strike almost anywhere), we have the largest supply of fresh water in the world, and the COL is already quite low attracting younger generations.
You're probably right. I changed it to 3 decades.
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Old 10-02-2018, 03:46 PM
 
21,187 posts, read 30,351,954 times
Reputation: 19614
Quote:
Originally Posted by Logicist027 View Post
So here is a question, where would you bet on to improve the most? Which areas of the country? I mean megaregions, states & metropolitan areas for comparison. Let's use by 2030 as the extent of the crystal ball and try to look into the future. You can use all of the basic metrics you would use anywhere else. QOL, downtowns, socially, jobs, COL, environment, politically etc.

Some ways that you could go at this question:

Where would you invest if you could?
Where would you live and expect things to get better?
Where would you tell someone to go if they are in the middle class and trying to get a better life?
Where will societal problems be tackled the most?
Quote:
Originally Posted by Vegabern View Post
Eleven years is not much time. I don't see any region changing that drastically in little over a decade.

I'll be a homer and say over a longer time period I see a Rust Belt revival. We have great bones, we're largely insulated from natural disasters (floods can strike almost anywhere), we have the largest supply of fresh water in the world, and the COL is already quite low attracting younger generations.
I would have to agree the Midwest/Rust Belt is where to go if is anyone currently considering a relocation to a place with reasonable housing costs minus the largely slave labor wages of the Sunbelt (with disproportionately high housing costs) or the astronomical housing costs of the Northeast or West Coast where not being a six figure salary person makes life miserable. One can already see metros like Detroit, Columbus, Cincinnati, Louisville, Omaha, Kansas City, Des Moines and Indianapolis attracting more young professionals so it isn't too far off base to see others like St Louis, Cleveland, Milwaukee...and even lower tier cities like Wichita or Grand Rapids really take off too.
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Old 10-02-2018, 06:06 PM
 
3,574 posts, read 1,187,224 times
Reputation: 2330
Quote:
Originally Posted by Logicist027 View Post
So here is a question, where would you bet on to improve the most? Which areas of the country? I mean megaregions, states & metropolitan areas for comparison. Let's use by 2048 as the extent of the crystal ball and try to look into the future. You can use all of the basic metrics you would use anywhere else. QOL, downtowns, socially, jobs, COL, environment, politically etc.

Some ways that you could go at this question:

Where would you invest if you could?
Where would you live and expect things to get better?
Where would you tell someone to go if they are in the middle class and trying to get a better life?
Where will societal problems be tackled the most?
*Sleeper suburb of a major sunbelt city.

*Major metro area in the sunbelt.

*Major metro area in the sunbelt.

*Not sure
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Old 10-03-2018, 05:56 AM
 
21,187 posts, read 30,351,954 times
Reputation: 19614
Quote:
Originally Posted by Logicist027 View Post

Some ways that you could go at this question:

Where would you invest if you could?
Where would you live and expect things to get better?
Where would you tell someone to go if they are in the middle class and trying to get a better life?
Where will societal problems be tackled the most?
Quote:
Originally Posted by citidata18 View Post
*Sleeper suburb of a major sunbelt city.

*Major metro area in the sunbelt.

*Major metro area in the sunbelt.

*Not sure
Both of which are largely bad ideas if one looks at the numbers...
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Old 10-03-2018, 06:46 AM
 
3,955 posts, read 3,487,388 times
Reputation: 6331
Quote:
Originally Posted by kyle19125 View Post
I would have to agree the Midwest/Rust Belt is where to go if is anyone currently considering a relocation to a place with reasonable housing costs minus the largely slave labor wages of the Sunbelt (with disproportionately high housing costs) or the astronomical housing costs of the Northeast or West Coast where not being a six figure salary person makes life miserable. One can already see metros like Detroit, Columbus, Cincinnati, Louisville, Omaha, Kansas City, Des Moines and Indianapolis attracting more young professionals so it isn't too far off base to see others like St Louis, Cleveland, Milwaukee...and even lower tier cities like Wichita or Grand Rapids really take off too.

Grand Rapids has been attracting young professionals for quite some time. The bulk of it's growth has come in the form of educated young professionals over the past 20 years.

6+ Figure Earning Households in MSAs, 2017 Edition

According to the math done in this thread the amount of households making over 100k/yr has increased 140% since 2010. This far out paces any other city/metro from an exponential standpoint, especially in the Midwest. Outside of the fact that it has a smaller city population than some of the cities you listed due to land constraints, i'm not sure why it would be considered lower tier. It competes well in these types of metrics with virtually every city in the Midwest, and quite a few outside of it.
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Old 10-03-2018, 08:42 AM
 
3,574 posts, read 1,187,224 times
Reputation: 2330
Quote:
Originally Posted by kyle19125 View Post
Both of which are largely bad ideas if one looks at the numbers...
What numbers?
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Old 10-03-2018, 09:13 AM
 
Location: St Simons Island, GA
23,052 posts, read 35,012,419 times
Reputation: 15172
Quote:
Originally Posted by citidata18 View Post
What numbers?
The very thing I was going to say.

For the Rust Belt advocates and other residents of the Midwest, here's an encouraging article:

https://www.bloombergquint.com/busin...s-about-growth
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Old 10-03-2018, 09:28 AM
 
Location: In the heights
22,119 posts, read 23,642,005 times
Reputation: 11611
My guess is large cities near and along the Great Lakes.
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