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Old 10-08-2018, 08:19 PM
 
170 posts, read 159,877 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by KathrynAragon View Post
You really just need to fly into, say, Tennessee, rent a car, and drive in a huge loop - TN, VA, NC, SC. GA, FL, AL, MS, LA, AR, then back across TN. Take several weeks. Do it in the summer so you get the full effect of a southern summer. Hit the beaches, the mountains, the rivers, the Gulf, the Atlantic, the historical spots, etc.

Don't rely in internet research. Get out and experience it.

I can assure you this is not going to happen. Why would you assume I have the money to do this? I am a truck driver who rents an apartment in Boise, Idaho. Not a retired school teacher. I will be relying very much on Internet research, and the best I can hope for is a flight into either Altanta or Indianapolis, and look around for a week for a place to rent. I am leaving Boise because there is nothing here for me. I moved here only a few years ago to be near my brother. He then unexpectedly died, and I am here alone now.
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Old 10-08-2018, 08:21 PM
 
170 posts, read 159,877 times
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Originally Posted by aardvarks View Post
If North Carolina is a consideration, western NC (Asheville, Boone) are much more comfortable in the Summer. Charlotte was too hot and humid for me.

Thanks, that is good info. I too have been to Charlotte in the summer (I used to be an OTR trucker), and it was frying pan hot.
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Old 10-08-2018, 08:25 PM
 
170 posts, read 159,877 times
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Originally Posted by jjbradleynyc View Post
Kentucky, geographically, is a beautiful state. Rolling hills, green, wooded, and around Lexington some stunning countryside. However, roughly east of Interstate 75, is the eastern area of Kentucky, and this area is pretty impoverished, and in my opinion, not an area to consider, unless you find it draws you there for some personal reason.

I too, have relatives in southeastern Kentucky, and my mother was born and raised there until she was 18, and left for Tennessee. Eastern Kentucky is beautiful, but a large majority of people there have very low paying jobs, and little opportunity for advancement, on the whole, so those who are educated move away, while those who "get stuck" in the cycle, stay. My mom could not wait to leave. She said it was "suffocating, and depressing."

Since coal has declined there, and with the rise of the prescription drug crisis, eastern KY is an area I'd not recommend focusing on. However, areas around Lexington and Louisville are very nice, and very desirable.

Take a look around there, and see what you think.

This is very well said. I had earlier written that I was a little bit spooked about living in the boonies outside of Knoxville, but perhaps it was Eastern Kentucky I was actually thinking about and not Tennessee. The reality that a large portion of kentucky is depressed makes me feel leery about living any where in Kentucky, almost as if the depressed mind-set will make its way into places like Lexington. For this reason, I just don't feel comfortable with kentucky.

Last edited by edujop; 10-08-2018 at 08:41 PM..
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Old 10-08-2018, 08:26 PM
 
170 posts, read 159,877 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jjbradleynyc View Post
Yeah, if you visit smaller towns in Georgia, in the past say, 20 years or so, many have turned their downtowns into little cute tourist spots, with quaint shops and very cool historic buildings and overall great community infrastructure. The boom of the Atlanta area and population increase in GA since 1990 or so has helped these smaller counties and communities out.

If you take a drive from Athens, GA to the southwest to Macon, you'll see some incredibly beautiful countryside and some great small town communities. Same goes for NC.

This is inspiring to me.
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Old 10-08-2018, 08:37 PM
 
170 posts, read 159,877 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Serious Conversation View Post
Lexington and Louisville are wonderful cities. Lexington is one of the cleanest mid-sized cities I've ever been in. Louisville has a wonderful food, art, and music scene, and "funky" hip, urban vibe. These cities really fly under the radar nationally because of the stigma of being in Kentucky.

You also have the Cincinnati suburbs in northern KY. They're culturally different from the rest of KY, but are nice places in their own right.

With that said, I think a lot of your impressions of "low class" come from eastern KY. There is truth in those stereotypes, but there are many wonderful people in this area. Still, unless you have a specific reason to be there, it's hard to recommend much of anything east of 75.



I also think this is true.

JJBradley and I are from the same area in east TN. Drug abuse, largely meth and opiates, are huge problems in the small towns and rural areas of east TN. There is simply no way around that.

I live in Johnson City, am from Kingsport, and am in each of the Tri-Cities at least once a week. I would say the worst of the drug problems are in Kingsport and Bristol, and largely among working class to poor residents. Drugs aren't really noticeable in Johnson City. Bristol is smaller and has never had the larger corporate base that Kingsport has or the more diverse economy of Johnson City. Still, if you're living in the city or Washington/Sullivan Counties, the drug problem is largely avoidable if you don't run with the wrong crowd.

A lot of people who are thinking about relocating to east TN from other areas think cities would have more crime and the rural areas would have less. It's actually the other way around. With the exception of occasional rough neighborhoods, the cities tend to be safer with less drug problems than very small towns or rural areas. Random violent crime anywhere in east TN is very low, but property crime, especially in rural areas, is very high. That largely boils back to druggies committing property crime, or people looking for drugs/money to buy drugs. Domestic crime is pretty high. County schools are generally lousy. City schools are much better.

There are counties here with a lot of problems I'd never consider living in. You couldn't pay me enough to live in Hawkins or Cocke counties. Hawkins and Cocke are particularly notorious for crime. Also, keep in mind that the more rural you get - the fewer services you have. There's a section of highway from around Bean Station, TN to the KY border that has no cell reception, even with Verizon. You may not have municipal water, cell service, or broadband internet. Medical care in the small towns isn't very good.

If I was not a native to this part of Tennessee, I'd definitely look closer to Knoxville. Knoxville has more amenities and is in a better location. You can still live in a rural area and be within thirty minutes of most of the attractions in Knoxville. The Tri-Cities is very isolated. If you've lived in a larger area, there are a lot of limitations living here. Johnson City is nice and close to Asheville. I'd be very hesitant to recommend anything but Johnson City/Gray/Jonesborough to an outsider. Some of the Cumberland Plateau communities (Cookeville, Monterey, etc.) are also worth a look.

Thank you for your insight into the region, especially the rural and cities dynamics. With regard to the tri-cities, I don't like the feeling of being isolated so I will cross the Tri-cities off my list. I feel vunerable in isolated places, in particular isolated, and not very state-of-the-art. Boise is isolated, but it is state-of-the-art, and I feel very safe here should I need services.
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Old 10-08-2018, 08:49 PM
 
170 posts, read 159,877 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Serious Conversation View Post
As far as the overall "best state to live" in the South, it's North Carolina hands down IMO.

NC has a bit of everything. The western part of the state is heavily forested and mountainous. You have much cooler temperatures in the summer, and there are several ski resorts. The eastern side has beaches. NC has multiple significant metros - Charlotte, the Triangle, the Triad, and various smaller areas. It's probably the most varied Southern state. I took a long weekend to Raleigh over July 4 and loved it.

SC is a lot like NC on a smaller scale of everything. Greenville is my favorite city in the South. Columbia and Charleston are both great places too.

The areas of VA that are culturally Southern are pretty rural with a tough economy. Outside of Atlanta, GA is mostly just small towns and too rural for me. I've heard good things about Huntsville and Birmingham.

The action in TN is mostly between Knoxville and Nashville. West TN is rural and is not that appealing. East TN has appeal from a recreation/outdoors standpoint, but again, it's a very tough economy.

My goal is to settle in NC or SC over the next year or two.

Yes I would imagine that the more southern parts of VA do have tougher economies, and as another person was saying about Johnson City, TN, also a bit isolated. I don't want to feel isolated. I like the comparison you make between NC and SC (SC is smaller scale version of NC). I have heard the infrastructure is beat to hell in Huntsville. I have been to Birmingham. I think it has potential. But instinctively I feel that culturally it wouldn't be a good fit for a 57 year old guy from Illinois with no contacts. I can just feel the wrong choice there. I like how you described TN. Also, I took note of your comments about towns outside of Atlanta. I have never been to any towns outside Atlanta. I just assumed they were bustling towns with strong economies.
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Old 10-08-2018, 09:01 PM
 
Location: Wonderland
44,953 posts, read 36,237,009 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by edujop View Post
I can assure you this is not going to happen. Why would you assume I have the money to do this? I am a truck driver who rents an apartment in Boise, Idaho. Not a retired school teacher. I will be relying very much on Internet research, and the best I can hope for is a flight into either Altanta or Indianapolis, and look around for a week for a place to rent. I am leaving Boise because there is nothing here for me. I moved here only a few years ago to be near my brother. He then unexpectedly died, and I am here alone now.
I didn't make any assumptions on your income. All I said is that would be the best way for you to get a feel for the different areas. Whether you can or will do so is up to you.

I sure wouldn't move someplace I knew nothing about based only on internet research though, but hey, that's just me. You do you. Good luck.
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Old 10-09-2018, 06:17 AM
Status: "Phillies baseball is MLB dysentery." (set 1 day ago)
 
1,237 posts, read 583,572 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by edujop View Post
Yes I would imagine that the more southern parts of VA do have tougher economies, and as another person was saying about Johnson City, TN, also a bit isolated. I don't want to feel isolated. I like the comparison you make between NC and SC (SC is smaller scale version of NC). I have heard the infrastructure is beat to hell in Huntsville. I have been to Birmingham. I think it has potential. But instinctively I feel that culturally it wouldn't be a good fit for a 57 year old guy from Illinois with no contacts. I can just feel the wrong choice there. I like how you described TN. Also, I took note of your comments about towns outside of Atlanta. I have never been to any towns outside Atlanta. I just assumed they were bustling towns with strong economies.
Regarding ATL. I think he means outside of Metro Atlanta, there's nothing but small towns. A place like Marietta or Stockbridge offers way more than Columbus or Perry, GA. GA is depressing out of Metro Atlanta and Savannah.
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Old 10-09-2018, 07:15 AM
 
11,893 posts, read 32,933,878 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by edujop View Post
Thank you for your insight into the region, especially the rural and cities dynamics. With regard to the tri-cities, I don't like the feeling of being isolated so I will cross the Tri-cities off my list. I feel vunerable in isolated places, in particular isolated, and not very state-of-the-art. Boise is isolated, but it is state-of-the-art, and I feel very safe here should I need services.
You really should check out Cookeville, Tennessee. It's not isolated, only an hour east of Nashville. It's in a beautiful region with 100 waterfalls and 1200 miles of lakeshore within 40 miles of town. It's safe, thriving, has a wonderful, intensely walkable downtown, it's got a booming tech scene with several hundred tech jobs in the last year from several companies (the big coup was when SAIC chose Cookeville for its technology integration gateway with 300 tech jobs downtown), it's a young town with the state's engineering and tech university, and it's become a popular area for those who work out of their homes and can live anywhere; even the rural areas outside of town have gigabit internet.

It's the kind of town that's popular with retirees and young people alike. It's one of the smallest towns in the country with its own professional symphony, its downtown is filled with dozens of galleries, eateries, shops, several museums, a performing arts center (indoor and outdoor - last week was Shakespeare in the Park, the week before that were free outdoor symphony concerts, a "blues & brews" beer & music festival is coming up, etc.), two different farmers markets, and more.
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Old 10-09-2018, 09:20 AM
 
Location: East Tennessee and Atlanta
3,685 posts, read 8,780,598 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by edujop View Post
This is very well said. I had earlier written that I was a little bit spooked about living in the boonies outside of Knoxville, but perhaps it was Eastern Kentucky I was actually thinking about and not Tennessee. The reality that a large portion of kentucky is depressed makes me feel leery about living any where in Kentucky, almost as if the depressed mind-set will make its way into places like Lexington. For this reason, I just don't feel comfortable with kentucky.
Yeah, the meth and prescription drug issue is big in all of the US, but in the rural southeast Appalachian region, it is a problem for sure. Eastern Kentucky and West Virginia are prime hot spots for this unfortunately.

As for eastern Kentucky, yes, it is isolated, rural and economically depressed, so it's not high on the list for most folks.

You'll be happier elsewhere in the southeast most likely. I'd check out Cookeville, as JMT recommended. Or try Knoxville or Chattanooga in Tennessee. Both are medium-sized cities with amazing close access to lakes, mountains, and outdoor activities in general.
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