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Old 02-04-2019, 10:02 AM
 
Location: Crooklyn, New York
28,266 posts, read 26,252,873 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by OyCrumbler View Post
If we’re talking about cities that have areas with narrow streets with attached buildings without setbacks then Philadelphia, Pittsburgh, Baltimore, Cincinnati, DC, New Orleans, San Francisco to name a few.
"Like the North End," to me, means a combination of narrow streets, no setbacks and higher streetwalls. There are quite a few older cities with attached buildings and no setbacks (the cities you mentioned plus Annapolis, MD come to mind), but few have those two things plus 4-6 story residential buildings over any significant footprint. That type of built environment is extremely rare and really only exists in swaths of Manhattan and small parts of Boston and Philly as far as the U.S. is concerned.
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Old 02-04-2019, 10:17 AM
 
Location: In the heights
22,152 posts, read 23,676,300 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BajanYankee View Post
"Like the North End," to me, means a combination of narrow streets, no setbacks and higher streetwalls. There are quite a few older cities with attached buildings and no setbacks (the cities you mentioned plus Annapolis, MD come to mind), but few have those two things plus 4-6 story residential buildings over any significant footprint. That type of built environment is extremely rare and really only exists in swaths of Manhattan and small parts of Boston and Philly as far as the U.S. is concerned.
I see. If those are the restrictions, then the only place that hits every element you've said outside of Manhattan, Boston, and Philadelphia I can think of is parts of Over-The-Rhine in Cincinnati which was built to a very high density though it's a bit pock-marked from the latter half of the 20th century. I'm surprised that Baltimore doesn't have such. I'm wondering why parts of San Francisco don't count--is that because of wider roads save for the narrower ones used as alleys for parking and sanitation?

One thing that's imperfectly arguable are places like Downtown Pittsburgh except that it's even taller than 4-6 stores a lot of times and only sometimes or partially residential buildings though these were often not built with residential in mind but were converted into such.
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Old 02-04-2019, 10:22 AM
 
Location: Crooklyn, New York
28,266 posts, read 26,252,873 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by OyCrumbler View Post
I'm wondering why parts of San Francisco don't count--is that because of wider roads save for the narrower ones used as alleys for parking and sanitation?
I would say so. Does Midtown give you the same sense of physical enclosure as Downtown/FiDi? To me, it does not.
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Old 02-04-2019, 10:40 AM
 
Location: In the heights
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BajanYankee View Post
I would say so. Does Midtown give you the same sense of physical enclosure as Downtown/FiDi? To me, it does not.
Midtown does not, though I guess when talking about San Francisco vs Boston, it's a matter of degrees and where San Francisco sort of dances just outside of the requirements on one front or another. San Francisco has streets that have all of what you're talking about in the narrower streets that function more as alleys, but those are alleys though people do walk in them (and these days, live in them). Then it has the streets that are more for the "front" of the buildings and sometimes have retail/commercial on the ground floor, but those are often four to five car lanes rather than say two to three, but not as wide as Midtown's larger avenues. Then there are narrower streets that are at the front of the buildings, but are usually built to a height of three stories and occasionally four rather than 4-6 as a standard save for small stretches like Sacramento Street in downtown San Francisco which are then seldom residential.
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Old 02-04-2019, 04:25 PM
 
653 posts, read 313,973 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BajanYankee View Post
"Like the North End," to me, means a combination of narrow streets, no setbacks and higher streetwalls. There are quite a few older cities with attached buildings and no setbacks (the cities you mentioned plus Annapolis, MD come to mind), but few have those two things plus 4-6 story residential buildings over any significant footprint. That type of built environment is extremely rare and really only exists in swaths of Manhattan and small parts of Boston and Philly as far as the U.S. is concerned.
Yes, exactly. I think most parts of San Francisco's Chinatown would fit this description.
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Old 02-04-2019, 06:13 PM
 
Location: Zurich, Switzerland/ Piedmont, CA
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ilovelondon View Post
Yes, exactly. I think most parts of San Francisco's Chinatown would fit this description.
North Beach and Telegraph Hill too.
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Old 02-05-2019, 07:42 AM
 
6,972 posts, read 14,100,231 times
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Originally Posted by ilovelondon View Post
Yes, exactly. I think most parts of San Francisco's Chinatown would fit this description.
Streets are still wider in SF.
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Old 02-05-2019, 07:52 AM
 
Location: In the heights
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Originally Posted by jessemh431 View Post
Streets are still wider in SF.
True, but there are streets in Chinatown and a few downtown and elsewhere that are narrower and not alleys. The issue with Chinatown was that most buildings were not in the 4 to 6 story range though there are some.

Also, the person your quoting was the original person asking for places that were like Boston’s North End and what that means to the poster might be slightly different from what others think he means. If he reckons Chinatown counts, then perhaps we need to adjust what parameters we’re looking at. It might be that narrow streets with majority three story buildings might be good enough to qualify as “like Boston’s North End”
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Old 02-05-2019, 08:41 AM
 
1,243 posts, read 1,597,007 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BajanYankee View Post
"Like the North End," to me, means a combination of narrow streets, no setbacks and higher streetwalls. There are quite a few older cities with attached buildings and no setbacks (the cities you mentioned plus Annapolis, MD come to mind), but few have those two things plus 4-6 story residential buildings over any significant footprint. That type of built environment is extremely rare and really only exists in swaths of Manhattan and small parts of Boston and Philly as far as the U.S. is concerned.
That's the same thing that I was thinking.
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Old 02-05-2019, 09:06 AM
 
Location: Boston, MA
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There is no place in the country like the North End that I have ever seen in the US. There are places similar to it but the North End is unique.
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