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Old 10-11-2018, 03:03 AM
 
3,584 posts, read 1,192,088 times
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What exactly is the purpose of this thread, besides trolling?
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Old 10-11-2018, 05:33 AM
 
Location: Terramaria
774 posts, read 840,526 times
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I find DC and LA's downtowns to be more segregated into terms of usage, and in DC's case, a higher percentage of 9-5 uses, with that city's most vibrant neighborhoods just outside its downtown (Dupont Circle, Georgetown, Foggy Bottom, Capitol Hill, U Street/Cardozo, and perhaps Shaw, NoMa and the H Street Corrdor). Even the National Mall is pretty quiet at night with the attractions closed, along with the fact that government buildings surround it on both sides. DC is only fully functional during the day, with the area around the Capitol One Arena (Penn Quarter/Chinatown) the lone exception, and perhaps in the immediate vicinity of hotels and theaters. It still has a considerably more suburban-oriented component compared to those in the top 5 (and Boston). At least Georgetown for the high-end shopping is walkable from the NW portion of downtown, and City Center adds another dimension that looks to add new vibrancy in that part of downtown.

LA has the 9-5 office and civic districts on its northern and western ends, underdeveloped land on its east side (a lot like Baltimore's west side, including Skid Row), while the Historic Core in the center is still up-and-coming, evolving slowly, but surely. That Fashion District also closes early unlike SoHo in NYC. The area around Staples Arena is a lot like the area around DC's arena, in terms of being the most vibrant. Chinatown is separated by a freeway currently, and Little Tokyo isn't that big, especially compared to Koreatown to its west which I found more vibrant at night when I last visited last year. LA doesn't have as many hotels per capita in its downtown compared to the Top 6 and even #7 (DC).

As for the top 5, they too have "dead zones" where there's a high concentration of office buildings, like Lasalle St. and the area around the central post office in Chicago, Montgomery/Sansome/Battery streets in San Francisco, Market West in Philadelphia, Boston's Financial District area, the central part of downtown Seattle (just west of First Hill south of Union and north of Yesler) and NYC's Wall Street area has traditionally been this, but of course, this is certainly becoming more active on nights/weekends.
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Old 10-11-2018, 06:08 AM
 
Location: New York City
5,709 posts, read 5,103,118 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ironcouger View Post
I would put the top 5 as New York,Chicago,San Fransico, Boston and Seattle.
You cannot leave Philadelphia out of top 5, whether you like the city of not. Seattle is not a top 5.
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Old 10-11-2018, 06:45 AM
 
29,905 posts, read 27,345,109 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Borntoolate85 View Post
I find DC and LA's downtowns to be more segregated into terms of usage, and in DC's case, a higher percentage of 9-5 uses, with that city's most vibrant neighborhoods just outside its downtown (Dupont Circle, Georgetown, Foggy Bottom, Capitol Hill, U Street/Cardozo, and perhaps Shaw, NoMa and the H Street Corrdor). Even the National Mall is pretty quiet at night with the attractions closed, along with the fact that government buildings surround it on both sides. DC is only fully functional during the day, with the area around the Capitol One Arena (Penn Quarter/Chinatown) the lone exception, and perhaps in the immediate vicinity of hotels and theaters. It still has a considerably more suburban-oriented component compared to those in the top 5 (and Boston). At least Georgetown for the high-end shopping is walkable from the NW portion of downtown, and City Center adds another dimension that looks to add new vibrancy in that part of downtown.

LA has the 9-5 office and civic districts on its northern and western ends, underdeveloped land on its east side (a lot like Baltimore's west side, including Skid Row), while the Historic Core in the center is still up-and-coming, evolving slowly, but surely. That Fashion District also closes early unlike SoHo in NYC. The area around Staples Arena is a lot like the area around DC's arena, in terms of being the most vibrant. Chinatown is separated by a freeway currently, and Little Tokyo isn't that big, especially compared to Koreatown to its west which I found more vibrant at night when I last visited last year. LA doesn't have as many hotels per capita in its downtown compared to the Top 6 and even #7 (DC).

As for the top 5, they too have "dead zones" where there's a high concentration of office buildings, like Lasalle St. and the area around the central post office in Chicago, Montgomery/Sansome/Battery streets in San Francisco, Market West in Philadelphia, Boston's Financial District area, the central part of downtown Seattle (just west of First Hill south of Union and north of Yesler) and NYC's Wall Street area has traditionally been this, but of course, this is certainly becoming more active on nights/weekends.
On the Mall, the museums are closed at night but the monuments are open to the public 24/7. I agree it's quiet down there at night but that can be the best time to visit the monuments, particularly in the warmer months.
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Old 10-11-2018, 12:55 PM
 
1,401 posts, read 1,639,867 times
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If you want to say top 5 downtowns by that criteria, I'd replace Seattle with Boston and agree with the other four. But the whole premise that there are only 5 (or 6) downtowns that are fully functioning is completely laughable. DC? Denver? LA? San Diego? Austin? Atlanta? NOLA? Greenville? Pittsburgh? Milwaukee? Cleveland?


Jaysus man, what a post.
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Old 10-11-2018, 02:14 PM
 
5,805 posts, read 8,564,607 times
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Originally Posted by cpomp View Post
You cannot leave Philadelphia out of top 5, whether you like the city of not. Seattle is not a top 5.
Philadelphia is missing the Corporate-Hub Component to Center City. It has every thing else, but its feel of a Corporate Center really lacks for Philly's size. Even Downtown Pittsburgh beats Center City here. Seattle has a much greater Corporate presence and feel to its downtown than Philly.

When you walk around Center City outside of Market/JFK 15 to 20th there's not much a professionals/suit/corporate/office worker vibe. Ala Lower Manhattan, K Street in DC, Grant Street in Pittsburgh, LaSalle Street in Chicago.

Last edited by Blackbeauty212; 10-11-2018 at 02:26 PM..
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Old 10-11-2018, 02:54 PM
 
Location: New York City
5,709 posts, read 5,103,118 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Blackbeauty212 View Post
Philadelphia is missing the Corporate-Hub Component to Center City. It has every thing else, but its feel of a Corporate Center really lacks for Philly's size. Even Downtown Pittsburgh beats Center City here. Seattle has a much greater Corporate presence and feel to its downtown than Philly.

When you walk around Center City outside of Market/JFK 15 to 20th there's not much a professionals/suit/corporate/office worker vibe. Ala Lower Manhattan, K Street in DC, Grant Street in Pittsburgh, LaSalle Street in Chicago.
So a corporate presence equates to a good downtown?.... I am going to leave that one alone.

And you have a very strong track record of putting Philadelphia down and boosting Pittsburgh EVERY chance you get. Don't think I forgot about your embarrassing collection of posts from the former Philadelphia vs. Pittsburgh thread.

First... have you been to Seattle? I have, as well as every other city in this discussion (all many times).

And if we are going by your (odd) logic, then Philadelphia has Seattle beat in architecture, street life/ activity, density, walk-ability, food and recreation offerings and cultural offerings. Seattle has a very nice downtown, but its still shy of the Philly, DC, Boston caliber. And I do not see it surpassing any of those cities because all are improving at very fast rates (most notably DC and Philly).

But I am sure you will find a way to turn it into a negative for Philadelphia, so if you plan to do that, I do not care for a response.
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Old 10-11-2018, 03:18 PM
 
311 posts, read 218,408 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Blackbeauty212 View Post
Philadelphia is missing the Corporate-Hub Component to Center City. It has every thing else, but its feel of a Corporate Center really lacks for Philly's size. Even Downtown Pittsburgh beats Center City here. Seattle has a much greater Corporate presence and feel to its downtown than Philly.

When you walk around Center City outside of Market/JFK 15 to 20th there's not much a professionals/suit/corporate/office worker vibe. Ala Lower Manhattan, K Street in DC, Grant Street in Pittsburgh, LaSalle Street in Chicago.
Black Beauty is back!
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Old 10-11-2018, 03:50 PM
 
Location: Washington DC
3,792 posts, read 3,299,795 times
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DC has a complete and functioning “downtown” which I consider a large portion of DC to be “downtown.” Not just the literal area called downtown.

And no. Atlanta, Denver, Houston and many, many other cities already being mentioned are not close to being “full and functional” by any stretch of the imagination.
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Old 10-11-2018, 05:15 PM
 
Location: St Simons Island, GA
23,055 posts, read 35,012,419 times
Reputation: 15192
Quote:
Originally Posted by Charlotte485 View Post
DC has a complete and functioning “downtown” which I consider a large portion of DC to be “downtown.” Not just the literal area called downtown.

And no. Atlanta, Denver, Houston and many, many other cities already being mentioned are not close to being “full and functional” by any stretch of the imagination.
Once again, we resort to the Broad Brush approach. Do you have any clue whatsoever what is going on in the downtowns of these cities? Thought not.
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