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Old 10-12-2018, 10:55 AM
 
Location: That star on your map in the middle of the East Coast, DMV
3,986 posts, read 3,466,424 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Iconographer View Post
The difference is that downtown DC is an epicenter of American high culture, what with its iconic structures and complex of world-class museums.
Exactly, which in my mind, separates it's tier from LA's.


DTLA, is more like DC's new 2nd downtown Capitol Riverfront/Navy yard in SE, under rapid transformation, with the urban bones to be it's own downtown.
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Old 10-12-2018, 03:16 PM
 
Location: Washington DC
3,813 posts, read 3,315,891 times
Reputation: 2721
Quote:
Originally Posted by Iconographer View Post
I could have predicted this silly response verbatim.
Sweet Auburn Market is very much a full service grocery store (complete with pharmacy), as the pictures indicate, with added benefit of home grown produce. Oh, but it's not a Publix; well boo hoo frickin' hoo.
Crickets on the clothing store comment, I see.
Let us assume Sweet Auburn Market (quaint name, I like it) is a legit full service grocery store complete with a pharmacy....


Its hours of operations are:


Monday-Saturday:
8 am – 6 pm*
Sunday:
12:00 – 5:00 pm*




FYI. DC has markets too and boutique grocers, etc. etc.. In addition to the numerous national grocers. In downtown ATL, I imagine you just drive down the road a couple miles to a very nice suburban area/formatted shopping center to get something as simple as groceries.




Maybe you can trust a local source... It is from 2015 but surely nothing has really changed. https://atlanta.curbed.com/maps/down...-a-grocery-map


Downtown's Depressingly Few Grocery Options, In a Cute Map!


On the heels of last month's major announcement of WRS Inc.'s planned purchase of Underground Atlanta, the Atlanta Business Chronicle reports that the hypothetical new owner is in talks with a grocery store for the hypothetical new urban center slated to rise on the site. While nothing is set in stone, the news is a big deal for current and future residents and the general livability of downtown Atlanta, which currently has no grocery store. The article mentions Walmart Neighborhood Market, City Target and Publix as possible options, though the future is hardly clear. Downtown has been a food desert since Kroger shuttered across from City Hall in 2005. To illustrate the lack of grocers in the downtown area, we've mapped out the limited options for buying the basics around our supposed urban nucleus. If downtown is going to thrive, we need to do better.






That's not fully functional. At all. For the record. I’m not saying one is better than another. Most people prefer suburbs. The entire point is the US has very few fully functional downtowns which is quite different from the rest of the world.
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Old 10-12-2018, 03:58 PM
 
Location: St Simons Island, GA
23,127 posts, read 35,070,436 times
Reputation: 15328
Quote:
Originally Posted by Charlotte485 View Post
Let us assume Sweet Auburn Market (quaint name, I like it) is a legit full service grocery store complete with a pharmacy....


Its hours of operations are:


Monday-Saturday:
8 am – 6 pm*
Sunday:
12:00 – 5:00 pm*




FYI. DC has markets too and boutique grocers, etc. etc.. In addition to the numerous national grocers. In downtown ATL, I imagine you just drive down the road a couple miles to a very nice suburban area/formatted shopping center to get something as simple as groceries.




Maybe you can trust a local source... It is from 2015 but surely nothing has really changed. https://atlanta.curbed.com/maps/down...-a-grocery-map


Downtown's Depressingly Few Grocery Options, In a Cute Map!


On the heels of last month's major announcement of WRS Inc.'s planned purchase of Underground Atlanta, the Atlanta Business Chronicle reports that the hypothetical new owner is in talks with a grocery store for the hypothetical new urban center slated to rise on the site. While nothing is set in stone, the news is a big deal for current and future residents and the general livability of downtown Atlanta, which currently has no grocery store. The article mentions Walmart Neighborhood Market, City Target and Publix as possible options, though the future is hardly clear. Downtown has been a food desert since Kroger shuttered across from City Hall in 2005. To illustrate the lack of grocers in the downtown area, we've mapped out the limited options for buying the basics around our supposed urban nucleus. If downtown is going to thrive, we need to do better.






That's not fully functional. At all. For the record. I’m not saying one is better than another. Most people prefer suburbs. The entire point is the US has very few fully functional downtowns which is quite different from the rest of the world.
You made a presumption about downtown Atlanta (there are no grocery stores or clothing stores there), and the presumption was false. And I will trust my own experience before I trust a "local source", especially since they got it wrong as well.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Charlotte485 View Post
Does downtown Atlanta even have a real grocery store? That’s as basic as it gets. Are there many clothing stores? Another basic. DC has like 4 or 5 H&Ms alone. Not that I particularly care for it, but the downtown area of DC along with a few other American cities are, really the only fully functional downtowns.
The fact is that downtown Atlanta does, and now you want to smokescreen that simple fact by equivocating. Manipulating the variables doesn't change any of that. Be a graceful loser.
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Old 10-12-2018, 04:11 PM
 
Location: Los Angeles, CA
2,923 posts, read 3,639,885 times
Reputation: 2144
Quote:
Originally Posted by Iconographer View Post
You made a presumption about downtown Atlanta (there are no grocery stores or clothing stores there), and the presumption was false. And I will trust my own experience before I trust a "local source", especially since they got it wrong as well.



The fact is that downtown Atlanta does, and now you want to smokescreen that simple fact by equivocating. Manipulating the variables doesn't change any of that. Be a graceful loser.
I clicked the link and I don’t consider that to be a grocery store. It’s a market with separate vendors selling produce. A market with many small vendors is not what most people consider to be a grocery store. Can you buy bread? Frozen or canned foods? Pet food? Dairy? It reminds me somewhat of what Grand Central Market in DTLA used to be like.

Edit to add that I’ve been to downtown Atlanta twice in the last couple years and explored extensively. I was impressed by the crowds at some places but thought that it had a long way to go in providing amenities for residents. There wasn’t much and of what there was much was closed on the weekends.
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Old 10-12-2018, 05:16 PM
 
Location: Los Angeles, CA
2,923 posts, read 3,639,885 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by the resident09 View Post
Exactly, which in my mind, separates it's tier from LA's.


DTLA, is more like DC's new 2nd downtown Capitol Riverfront/Navy yard in SE, under rapid transformation, with the urban bones to be it's own downtown.
I havenít been to Capitol Riverfront/Navy Yard but from what Iíve read and seen online I donít think that itís much like DTLA, but neither is downtown DC really. DTLA is tall and spread out and made up of very distinct neighborhoods. Some are old and have grown through adaptive reuse (Historic Core), some are new and have added and adding tens of thousands of new units (South Park), some are nearly all business (financial district), ethnic (Chinatown, Little Tokyo), Arts District, fashion district, toy District, skid row, etc.

DTLA may be behind DC, but I donít think as far as you think.
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Old 10-12-2018, 05:25 PM
 
Location: Los Angeles, CA
2,923 posts, read 3,639,885 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by the resident09 View Post
Both pics are two blocks away from their respective city's convention center. Why does DTLA have an "abysmal block" two blocks over from the convention center, when two blocks away from DC's is a "prime street"? Hence exactly why I say the downtowns are in two different tiers.
The area around the LA Convention center was desolate 20 years ago. Thats why the city encouraged Staples and LA Live hoping that they could turn around a moribund area. And they pretty much have. Within 3 blocks of that location 16 high rises have been built in the last 8 years with 4 more scheduled to break ground in the next 6 months. Two of them where your link is.
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Old 10-12-2018, 05:47 PM
 
Location: That star on your map in the middle of the East Coast, DMV
3,986 posts, read 3,466,424 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 2Easy View Post
The area around the LA Convention center was desolate 20 years ago. Thats why the city encouraged Staples and LA Live hoping that they could turn around a moribund area. And they pretty much have. Within 3 blocks of that location 16 high rises have been built in the last 8 years with 4 more scheduled to break ground in the next 6 months. Two of them where your link is.
Oh I understand and itís the same for DC, less than 20 years ago the new convention center was built as well as the MCI/Verizon Center/Capitol One Arena (has had 3 names in 20 years). But the old convention center was torn down leaving a big gap in the urban fabric for almost a decade so it took time to fill back in.

Look I think DTLA specifically has made some of the biggest gains of North American cities growth in terms of downtown. I was last there in 2016 and saw so much progress from my previous visits. I know cranes go up fast there so Iím sure much has been added. And I totally believe you that much of those lots and redevelopments are breaking ground soon. I just point to an entirely different feel I get when Iím in DTLA vs DC or any major NE city downtown really.

Iíll be in LA in January and will take an even closer look if I get a chance to go downtown.
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Old 10-12-2018, 05:59 PM
 
Location: The State Of California
9,470 posts, read 12,319,631 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by the resident09 View Post
Downtown DC crushes DTLA, and checks all "downtown" boxes. First of all its larger than all these downtowns in this thread other than Manhattan and Chicago. It checks boxes in everything imaginable, foot traffic, five star restaurants, high end retail, mid level retail, world class transit, bike lanes etc, 2nd busiest DT Amtrak station in the US, convention space, major stadiums, more downtown hotel rooms than any of the big cities not name NY or Chicago, and the best collection of museums in the country.

DC has a Manhattan style rush hour (albeit smaller scale), that I have experienced in none of the other cities being discussed including Boston and Philadelphia, their rush hours pale in comparison to Washington DC. In 2018 DC is also very much a weekend and after hours downtown compared to how it used to be. Now some people will point out on occasion there are dead pockets of DTDC and that may be the case in front of buildings in certain "parts" of the downtown that frankly weren't created for much activity due to a government building taking up the block. But don't get it twisted into think that even half the Downtown is like that. It's practically full and there is very little space to build new buildings anymore, surface parking is almost non existent. DC is an active vibrant downtown, with wall to wall retail on practically every street corner and no gaps.

With that said I've been to cities across the world and compared to many of them DC's downtown would be considered merely average, as would Seattle.

Also DC's downtown has been the fastest growing and most changed on the East Coast the past 15-20 years. I'm not sure where you're getting your information from or if you are just going by the past 4 years. DC is probably the only EC city that rivals Seattle like growth with how many cranes cover the skyline, although Seattle has been the fastest of any major city in the country overall. DC is in a completely different league from DTLA however.
Fake news......
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Old 10-12-2018, 06:10 PM
 
Location: Bishkek
1,978 posts, read 1,819,546 times
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Many small cities meet this criteria and are a lot more fun to live in too.
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Old 10-12-2018, 09:06 PM
 
5,859 posts, read 14,057,064 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Charlotte485 View Post


Pretty much if it isn’t in this frame (excluding Rosslyn), I don’t really consider it the downtown (again. Downtown as in a general term and not the specific area called downtown).
Here's Downtown DC:

https://www.google.com/maps/place/Do...!4d-77.0362937

As you can see, it doesn't include Georgetown, Foggy Bottom, Dupont Circle, the West End, etc.
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