U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S.
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 10-12-2018, 07:31 PM
 
1,298 posts, read 1,200,807 times
Reputation: 3072

Advertisements

Most cities have ordinary looking places, hidden in plain sight, that have historic, interesting, oddball, or infamous past lives.

Houston:

https://goo.gl/maps/zetpLajTex72
Now a liquor store, former Comics Annex where Outlaw Comics Sam Kinison and Bill Hicks were based, and across the street is the convenience store where Kinison hung himself on a cross in protest that he was being crucified for being thrown out of the club. The owner relented and let him back in, and then Kinison ended up breaking the man's leg.

https://goo.gl/maps/UroHmyq7qR12
Now a fully gentrified coffee shop, former famous/infamous Mary's Lounge, first Houston openly public gay bar in 1970, later home of hundreds of memorial services for HIV-AIDS victims with many of their ashes interred (still) in the small area behind the shop.

Buffalo

https://goo.gl/maps/khCDaJF46qD2
Now an antique shop and liquor store, formerly Mulligan's Nightclub, regular hangout of Rick James, OJ Simpson and friends in the "back room" of the club. Also site where mobster Frank D'Angelo was assassinated while dining at the outdoor sidewalk cafe in 1974.

https://goo.gl/maps/LfoEZWNKd9q
Now a pharmacy, formerly The Spectrum nightclub, featuring regular music performances including the Talking Heads in the 1970s. Famous/infamous for some of us as home of the Wednesday "Penny Beer" night, for a glorious (but brief) few weeks in the late 1970s.

Any other suggestions from cities or places where you lived?

Last edited by RocketSci; 10-12-2018 at 07:50 PM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 10-12-2018, 09:32 PM
 
5,859 posts, read 14,048,152 times
Reputation: 3482
OK, I'll play:

St. Paul:
https://www.google.com/maps/@44.9386...7i13312!8i6656

This is currently the Lincoln Court Apartments, as it was in 1934 when John Dillinger holed up there with his girlfriend Billie Frechette. The feds found out he was there and surveilled the place. After a gun battle involving Dillinger firing on the agents with a Tommie gun, he was shot in the leg but managed to escape. He managed to get medical attention and fled to his father's house in Indiana.

Chicago:
https://www.google.com/maps/@41.9262...7i16384!8i8192
Still the Biograph Theater, after all these years. This is where John Dillinger was shot and killed by the feds in 1934.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-12-2018, 09:39 PM
 
5,859 posts, read 14,048,152 times
Reputation: 3482
Here's another one in St Paul:
https://www.google.com/maps/@44.9466...7i13312!8i6656

Charles Schulz, creator of the comic strip Peanuts, grew up in one of the upstairs apartments in this building. His father had a barber shop in a store front downstairs. Currently, this is a bar, taking up the entire first floor of the building including the old barber shop. The owners recently decided to sell it to developers who will tear it down and build a multi-story apartment building with retain in this site.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-12-2018, 09:47 PM
 
5,859 posts, read 14,048,152 times
Reputation: 3482
Pittsburgh:

https://www.google.com/maps/@40.4130...!7i8704!8i4352

Technically, Munhall, PA. This is the site of the "Battle of Homestead" in 1892 when striking steel mill workers were attacked by private cops hired by Henry Clay Frick, chairman of the Carnegie Steel Company (later incorporated into U.S. Steel Corporation)
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-13-2018, 09:00 PM
 
6,127 posts, read 6,445,193 times
Reputation: 6543
Deadwood, SD

Saloon No. 10, where Wild Bill was shot.
https://goo.gl/maps/6ETGpeixWbm

Mount Moriah Cemetery, where he and Calamity Jane are buried.
https://goo.gl/maps/d4todYvo9p92
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-14-2018, 07:54 AM
 
Location: The Heart of Dixie
7,820 posts, read 12,324,125 times
Reputation: 4768
The Penthouse strip club in Baton Rouge used to be the Gold Club (the new Gold Club is something entirely new and related) and Stormy Daniels used to dance there.....
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-14-2018, 08:24 AM
 
1,298 posts, read 1,200,807 times
Reputation: 3072
"Past Lives" to me implies places that have been re-purposed from their original use, often with little to nothing that may give a clue as to their former use or history.

Buffalo:
https://goo.gl/maps/dvg4opFevST2
Four Presidents - Now the offices of a Title Insurance company, the middle building dates back to 1831 as a Unitarian Church that Millard Fillmore attended most of his life. Visitors brought by Fillmore included John Quincy Adams and Abraham Lincoln. The building to the left is the former Buffalo City Hall (now Erie County Hall) where the office of Grover Cleveland (as former Mayor of Buffalo) is maintained although not open to the public.

Houston:
https://goo.gl/maps/SYDLaa5tgA62
Hard to believe now, but this "was" the Port of Houston prior to the dredging downstream that created the Ship Channel and Turning Basin after the Galveston Hurricane of 1900. Barges were still brought to this location up through WW2. Today the water is too shallow (much debris was dumped into the bayou during road construction and landscaping) for more than small flat both recreational boats. In the background is the University of Houston downtown, and the Harris County Jail. The area by the water is a park and hike-bike trail, with many transients living along the least developed sections.

Last edited by RocketSci; 10-14-2018 at 08:40 AM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-14-2018, 09:51 AM
 
Location: Terramaria
774 posts, read 840,917 times
Reputation: 910
Baltimore has them all over the place, and in many cases, the past lives were better than the present.

The most famous example is right here downtown at the corner of Howard and Lexington streets, where FOUR department stores once resided, one at each corner:

https://www.google.com/maps/@39.2915...thumbfov%3D100

The eight-story building on the right (SW corner) was once the flagship Hecht's department store (bought out by Macy's in 2006). Today, there's a small Walgreens and part of the building is trying to be converted to lofts, but much of it still stands vacant. The SE corner mostly had botiques, which later devolved to a pharmacy, with a vacant "Discount Center" in its place. The NE corner was once Stewart's and is the most elegant of the remaining buildings, but sadly is mostly vacant. Finally, the NW corner held Hochschild-Kohn Company, and was later razed into the new home for Hutzler's in the early 1980s, which originally was in the middle of the block (the iconic "Palace" building still stands today), but later expanded with a newer building.

Howard Street itself was once two way with two lanes in either direction, with a fifth for standing on the southbound direction, but is today reduced to a single lane northbound thanks to the Light Rail.

If you click on the top photo there, you can browse many photos of this area and sadly see how great Baltimore's main downtown shopping district once was:

Revisiting the heyday of department stores and five-and-dimes - Baltimore Sun

Overall, this area's "prime" was from around the turn of the 20th century until around the early 1960s, when its long-term decline began in earnest. Suburban shopping malls, white flight, and an uptick in crime were its primary causes of decline.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-14-2018, 11:05 AM
 
Location: TOVCCA
8,452 posts, read 11,434,710 times
Reputation: 12307
Las Vegas used to have a natural river running through it, and was an area of extensive green! Las Vegas being Spanish for "the meadows."

In the 19th century, areas of the valley contained artesian wells that supported extensive green areas, or meadows, hence the name. Settlers pumped the region dry.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-14-2018, 07:13 PM
 
Location: Salt Lake City
21,959 posts, read 22,109,113 times
Reputation: 10689
Quote:
Originally Posted by nightlysparrow View Post
Las Vegas used to have a natural river running through it, and was an area of extensive green! Las Vegas being Spanish for "the meadows."

In the 19th century, areas of the valley contained artesian wells that supported extensive green areas, or meadows, hence the name. Settlers pumped the region dry.
And then the city pumped the hopeful gamblers dry.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S.
Similar Threads
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top