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Old 10-17-2018, 09:40 AM
 
1,041 posts, read 521,061 times
Reputation: 1892

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Quote:
Originally Posted by jbcmh81 View Post
Where do you get that itís the opposite?

Most domestic migration in Southern states is just between other Southern states. North to South regional migration has been vastly overblown for decades by people who have no idea how to look at the available data.

Iím any case, people should be restricted from living in the most vulnerable areas.
Yeah... this isn't true at all. The states sending the most domestic migrants south have long been places like Illinois, New Jersey, New York, Connecticut and California. Most southern states gain immigrants from a wide variety of domestic sources, but northern and Midwestern states make up a big chunk of that.
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Old 10-17-2018, 09:40 AM
Status: "Summer!" (set 17 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
86,992 posts, read 102,568,112 times
Reputation: 33059
Ironically, we have some friends who left Colorado for Florida because Colorado was "too cold". Out of the frying pan into the fire?
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Old 10-17-2018, 09:47 AM
Status: "Destroying False Hope..." (set 16 days ago)
 
Location: Houston for Living/Los Angeles for Work
1,172 posts, read 398,433 times
Reputation: 1515
As a Houston resident who lives in a neighborhood that did receive flooding, the answer is no.

I dont know one person that is moving because their house flooded and I know quite a few people whose houses flooded. The answer that is more correct is that people are elevating their houses and the city is widening the bayous. The city is trying to make it to where home flooding will be minimal in the future.

What people who are not from here is that most of the flooding didnt come directly from the storm outside of areas that are flood prone (and no most of Houston isnt actually flood prone). A large part of it came because the city released the Barker Cypress reservoir. That caused an area that has never flooded at all to flood.

Bottom line is this: there are roughly 850,000 homes in Houston. 96,000 flooded. What is happening instead is that people are shying away from certain neighborhoods or elevating houses. They certainly are not leaving the city though.
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Old 10-17-2018, 10:07 AM
 
1,041 posts, read 521,061 times
Reputation: 1892
Quote:
Originally Posted by As Above So Below... View Post
As a Houston resident who lives in a neighborhood that did receive flooding, the answer is no.

I dont know one person that is moving because their house flooded and I know quite a few people whose houses flooded. The answer that is more correct is that people are elevating their houses and the city is widening the bayous. The city is trying to make it to where home flooding will be minimal in the future.

What people who are not from here is that most of the flooding didnt come directly from the storm outside of areas that are flood prone (and no most of Houston isnt actually flood prone). A large part of it came because the city released the Barker Cypress reservoir. That caused an area that has never flooded at all to flood.

Bottom line is this: there are roughly 850,000 homes in Houston. 96,000 flooded. What is happening instead is that people are shying away from certain neighborhoods or elevating houses. They certainly are not leaving the city though.
Yeah I concur. I've lived in Houston a good chunk of my life as well and don't know of anyone leaving because of flooding. I'm sure there are a few people who are but its still not offsetting the number of people moving here overall.

Most people who live in the coastal southeast are not ignorant of hurricane risk - they simply accept that risk as a potential price of living where they want. Just like people in California accept earthquake and wildfire risks, or how people in the Midwest accept tornado risk. I don't see hurricanes affecting much at all in the long term.
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Old 10-17-2018, 10:42 AM
 
Location: St Simons Island, GA
23,063 posts, read 35,020,344 times
Reputation: 15198
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mr. Clutch View Post
Yeah I concur. I've lived in Houston a good chunk of my life as well and don't know of anyone leaving because of flooding. I'm sure there are a few people who are but its still not offsetting the number of people moving here overall.

Most people who live in the coastal southeast are not ignorant of hurricane risk - they simply accept that risk as a potential price of living where they want. Just like people in California accept earthquake and wildfire risks, or how people in the Midwest accept tornado risk. I don't see hurricanes affecting much at all in the long term.
Case in Point: Homestead, FL, a town completely obliterated by Hurricane Andrew in 1992. Twenty years later, it had risen from the ashes, bigger and better than ever.

https://www.nbcmiami.com/news/local/...441464193.html
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Old 10-17-2018, 03:30 PM
 
Location: Pure Michigan!
4,346 posts, read 7,421,558 times
Reputation: 6783
I was just reading some threads in the Florida and Myrtle Beach forums where people are either planning to leave the area because of the storms and flooding or have already left and have no plans to go back, so this must be a thing, at least for some people.

Like I said, we do own a condo in South Carolina but other than that we don't have a dog in this fight, so to speak, because we are very happy where we live and have no plans to move down there or anywhere else on the coast. I was just curious if it would influence people who are planning to move there in the future. The devastation that we saw was terrible. My heart goes out to the people who lost their homes and all of their possessions.
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Old 10-17-2018, 03:41 PM
Status: "Be yourself. What's the alternative?" (set 18 days ago)
 
8,681 posts, read 10,836,637 times
Reputation: 12728
I personally wouldn't live on the Coast anywhere, but if people want to, that's their business.
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Old 10-17-2018, 04:08 PM
 
3,587 posts, read 1,523,767 times
Reputation: 3022
I live in the Charlotte area and the hurricane activity isn't an issue. It's an issue that could affect coastal areas in terms of whether to live there or not and less so for inland areas.
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Old 10-17-2018, 04:46 PM
 
Location: Minneapolis, MN
6,060 posts, read 3,383,155 times
Reputation: 7709
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pilot1 View Post
As I said, nothing hitting the U.S. of any significance for TEN YEARS.

Is it 2022 already?? Last I checked, its only been SIX years since Hurricane Sandy.
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Old 10-17-2018, 04:47 PM
 
Location: Minneapolis, MN
6,060 posts, read 3,383,155 times
Reputation: 7709
Quote:
Originally Posted by sean1the1 View Post
Nope, up north winters will always make down south look attractive!!

Speaketh for thyself! Its only mid-October and I'm already day dreaming of white, white, white
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