U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S.
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 10-18-2018, 07:00 AM
 
5,459 posts, read 2,298,642 times
Reputation: 16439

Advertisements

What?

This is normal hurricane activity. Lest you forget, we had an almost complete lack of hurricanes hitting the coast for a period of 8-9 years after 2005.

The core of a hurricane is large, but not enormous. For example, Mexico Beach was hit badly, along with the eastern portions of Panama City, but west of that saw mainly rain. What's more Mexico Beach was a practically a museum of 50s and 60s beach house architecture before the building codes were updated. Small wonder it blew away like so many matchsticks.

I mean, hell, we could use the same argument about Oklahoma, Kansas, or Nebraska and tornadoes. According to your logic, the entire city of Oklahoma City should simply throw everything into a moving van and drive away.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 10-18-2018, 07:02 AM
 
5,459 posts, read 2,298,642 times
Reputation: 16439
Quote:
Originally Posted by gladhands View Post
There has been a marked increase in devastating storms, and itís going to get worse. Hurricanes are getting stronger and lasting longer.

https://www.theguardian.com/weather/...-getting-worse

Climate change is real. Your post is nonsense.

Quit reading agenda-driven fishwrappers such as the Guardian and get a more balanced view.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-18-2018, 07:07 AM
 
Location: Wonderland
44,747 posts, read 36,160,327 times
Reputation: 63385
Quote:
Originally Posted by jbcmh81 View Post
Any reason why the rest of the country should have to subsidize that risk with billions in disaster relief because people there are too selfish or short-sighted?
Coupla things:

1) Have you ever had to deal with FEMA? I mean on a long term basis, as in repairing or rebuilding property? Without going into boring detail, I'll just say it works about as well as any other sprawling, dysfunctional government agency.

And you have to income qualify for different levels of FEMA care. FEMA doesn't typically rebuild homes for even middle class folks. And a lot of FEMA care is in the form of loans - did you know that? As in the funds must be paid back. And sometimes if a person or family receives FEMA care and are "due" a tax refund, that tax refund - or years of tax refunds - is taken by FEMA.

2) FEMA subsidizes emergency care for ALL parts of the country. Take a look at the maps below to see the risk factors for each part of the country - there's hardly a spot in the country that's below even a moderate risk for SOMETHING happening - either earthquakes, wildfires, tornadoes, flooding, hurricanes, or nuclear meltdowns - or several risk factors at once. Most of our population lives in some sort of risk zone.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-18-2018, 07:49 AM
 
Location: Pure Michigan!
4,347 posts, read 7,423,145 times
Reputation: 6783
Quote:
Originally Posted by MinivanDriver View Post
I mean, hell, we could use the same argument about Oklahoma, Kansas, or Nebraska and tornadoes. According to your logic, the entire city of Oklahoma City should simply throw everything into a moving van and drive away.
I'm not sure whom this was directed to, but if you meant it for me as the OP, I can assure you that I never in any way indicated that people should permanently leave the area where a natural disaster has occurred if it is their home, life is never that black and white. For example, if someone grew up in Houston and their entire family and life is there, why would they want to leave regardless of what happened weather wise? We have had very, very occasional tornadoes in my native area over the years and that I know of, no one has moved away because of it. Perhaps that is a case of apples and oranges since a tornado tends to touch down quickly and move on, affects a miniscule area as opposed to a hurricane ( at least here in the Great Lakes region, I cannot speak to the tornadoes that hit in places like Oklahoma and Kansas, I have never experienced one) and does not cause widespread evacuations, but it is essentially the same concept.

My original question concerned people who were considering moving to an area affected by large hurricanes, not people who already have roots there, although I did see news reports of several people who questioned if they would rebuild in the area affected by Hurricane Florence after having experienced similar destruction only a couple of years ago when Hurricane Matthew hit the area. Based on some of the threads I have seen here on City-Data in recent weeks in the forums of the states that were affected by recent hurricanes, it's a legitimate question and there are people who are rethinking their potential move.

The recent storms and subsequent devastation have really made me think about how much I would have to hate winter in the North and need to live near a beach to potentially endure what those folks have been through. For me, it would never be worth it, much as I get tired of winter by late February/early March and enjoy walking on the beach, but everyone is different.

Last edited by canudigit; 10-18-2018 at 07:58 AM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-18-2018, 08:51 AM
 
21,188 posts, read 30,366,193 times
Reputation: 19627
Quote:
Originally Posted by MinivanDriver View Post
Quit reading agenda-driven fishwrappers such as the Guardian and get a more balanced view.
There...I fixed it for you. Though it has the same inconvenient results.

https://www.forbes.com/sites/uhenerg.../#6be7c0641157
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-18-2018, 09:04 AM
 
Location: Nantahala National Forest, NC
27,093 posts, read 5,897,864 times
Reputation: 30347
I know quite a few who have moved away from the NC coastal areas due to repeated storm damage. Just too much to go through over and over.

And I also moved from the coast to the mts., not because of weather but still, glad I did...you never know when the hurricane will be spot on in your area. That's why it seems naive when I hear people say they will rebuild or say they didn't think the hurricane results would be bad...
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-18-2018, 09:06 AM
 
21,188 posts, read 30,366,193 times
Reputation: 19627
As a native Floridian who was luckily able to avoid the major storms (Andrew, Francis and Charley) while living out of state I wasn't so lucky for Irma last year, and never want to experience that again. Having to wonder if the roof or windows are going to hold, if trees are going to impale the roof plus being unable to see anything to pitch darkness...coupled with howling winds for hours on end is something not akin to any other natural disaster seen elsewhere in the US. Yes tornadoes do pop up but their scope is limited and very rarely seen in higher density areas. Earthquakes are another unpredictable disaster waiting to happen but pretty clearly limited to the west coast in terms of routine occurrences. The same goes for mudslides and wild fires. Hurricanes are truly the only weather disaster out there where we're tortured by 24/7 news coverage that sets up an increasing state of panic (will it wind up here?) for days preceding followed by if unlucky...a fairly long direct hit of several hours and then of course the joy of no electricity for sometimes days on end, which means no A/C in a hot/humid climate. Once every year or two of that for me is just too much and certainly not worth the stress and financial strain (home insurance/replacement costs) to maintain living here.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-18-2018, 09:31 AM
 
Location: North Beach, MD on the Chesapeake
33,884 posts, read 42,114,647 times
Reputation: 43291
Quote:
Originally Posted by KathrynAragon View Post
Coupla things:

1) Have you ever had to deal with FEMA? I mean on a long term basis, as in repairing or rebuilding property? Without going into boring detail, I'll just say it works about as well as any other sprawling, dysfunctional government agency.

And you have to income qualify for different levels of FEMA care. FEMA doesn't typically rebuild homes for even middle class folks. And a lot of FEMA care is in the form of loans - did you know that? As in the funds must be paid back. And sometimes if a person or family receives FEMA care and are "due" a tax refund, that tax refund - or years of tax refunds - is taken by FEMA.

2) FEMA subsidizes emergency care for ALL parts of the country. Take a look at the maps below to see the risk factors for each part of the country - there's hardly a spot in the country that's below even a moderate risk for SOMETHING happening - either earthquakes, wildfires, tornadoes, flooding, hurricanes, or nuclear meltdowns - or several risk factors at once. Most of our population lives in some sort of risk zone.
I have found, not having to directly interact with it for personal damage, that the quality of service received is dependent on the FEMA representatives themselves and the local contact person.

The FEMA people I've dealt with as a local contact have been exemplary and in many cases went above and beyond their job duties to assist people.

Yes, there are income qualifiers. The last time we had major tropical storm damage (2003) the majority of people who were required to raise their houses above BFE when doing a total rebuild were qualified for a $30K grant and a 2% loan above $30K to do the construction. The average total cost for that work was in the $50K range. So that wasn't bad, $20K at 2%, considering the houses were appraised at $500K to $900K after rebuilding.

The only individual who had a problem with FEMA couldn't make up his mind on whether to raise his house (it was not totaled but damaged). He waited so long to decide that the time frame for eligibility ran out and he didn't receive any money. He wrote letters and blamed me to an extent for his missing the program. He did nothing but dither and dawdle for two years. He did end up raising the house but had to borrow the amount at commercial rates (I believe he told me 8%. Since he had a tendency to overstate I'd discount that and call it 5 1/2%). He blamed me for that, too, because I didn't tell him the right amount it would cost to raise it, I'd estimated $75K (a number I'd gotten from a contractor friend) and it was $80K from a different contractor.

On the other hand the other 20 people I helped through the process had no complaints.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-18-2018, 11:38 AM
 
Location: In the hot spot!
3,399 posts, read 4,802,516 times
Reputation: 3201
In answer to the original question; yes. I have looked at coastal cities in the southeast, but have reconsidered inlight of the past two or three hurricane seasons.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-18-2018, 01:31 PM
 
Location: Northern Virginia
747 posts, read 255,620 times
Reputation: 1695
I doubt hurricanes have much of a long term impact. For one, the areas that have seen most investment and therefore the big job growth and biggest influx of newcomers tend to be quite a bit away from the coast, whether that's Atlanta, the Triangle, Charlotte, or Nashville. Hurricanes usually mean rainy days there but pretty limited actual damage.



Secondly, hurricanes have always been around in the coastal areas. I suspect most people are more or less aware of them. On average your specific neck of the woods isn't likely to see a major landfall more than once every few decades. Of course, when it does happen it'll be on people's minds for a number of years..only to eventually be forgotten again and replaced by a general sense of vague awareness.



It's different in Florida, of course, but everyone's always known that Florida means hurricanes. If Andrew didn't stop people, nothing will.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S.
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top