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Old 10-18-2018, 02:10 PM
 
Location: North Beach, MD on the Chesapeake
33,875 posts, read 42,085,992 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Veritas Vincit View Post
I doubt hurricanes have much of a long term impact. For one, the areas that have seen most investment and therefore the big job growth and biggest influx of newcomers tend to be quite a bit away from the coast, whether that's Atlanta, the Triangle, Charlotte, or Nashville. Hurricanes usually mean rainy days there but pretty limited actual damage.



Secondly, hurricanes have always been around in the coastal areas. I suspect most people are more or less aware of them. On average your specific neck of the woods isn't likely to see a major landfall more than once every few decades. Of course, when it does happen it'll be on people's minds for a number of years..only to eventually be forgotten again and replaced by a general sense of vague awareness.



It's different in Florida, of course, but everyone's always known that Florida means hurricanes. If Andrew didn't stop people, nothing will.
Yes. The owners of the house I mentioned earlier who missed the FEMA deadline were two such (husband and wife then widowed husband) who had to learn the lesson over and over.

We haven't had a direct hurricane hit here since the 1950s (Hazel) but we do often get tropical storms from the remnants or have the west side of the storm pass over.

They had to be reeducated for every storm starting in 1985 (Hurricane Gloria followed by Juan).
"Yes, your house at +2.5ft. above mean high tide will flood."
"No, that handful of pea gravel on the seat will not keep your wicker chairs from blowing away."
"Please move your cars to higher ground. They will flood and become boats."
"Please evacuate. It's been declared mandatory. The surge is estimated to be 7ft. and you're at +2.5ft."

Every single storm from 1985 to 2008.
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Old 10-18-2018, 07:17 PM
 
Location: Raleigh, NC
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I have not seen much reliable information indicating that hurricanes are becoming more common. My understanding is that with climate change they are becoming stronger because warm water gives them more energy. In addition, rising sea levels make coastal locations more vulnerable, especially to storm surge.

I do think that the existence of climate change is gaining more acceptance and that along with that some people (probably a relatively small number) are going to be more cautious about moving to coastal areas. In all honesty, that may be a good thing. As others have pointed out, a lot of the largest, fastest growing metros in the South are not coastal (Atlanta, Charlotte, Nashville, Raleigh, and even Orlando), so I don't know that this will have a large effect on overall migration patterns to the Southeast.
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Old 10-19-2018, 04:01 PM
 
Location: Beautiful and sanitary DC
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Coastal property values are already declining, especially in relative terms. IMO, younger generations aren't as drawn to own beach houses as Boomers were.

Inland cities are less obviously at risk from storm surge, but in some ways even more at risk from flooding. Wetter storms that linger over land, as Harvey and Florence did, can bring tremendous rain well inland; Hurricane Harvey dropped over a foot of rain over 100 miles inland. Coastal plains are flat and sandy, and so water rises more slowly; piedmont and mountain terrain has more topography and rockier soil, which results in faster floodwaters and more debris.
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Old 12-24-2018, 09:04 AM
 
Location: livin' the good life
2,148 posts, read 3,669,364 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by canudigit View Post
Even with low taxes and good home insurance in place, it still wouldn't be worth it to me to face having to replace my home from the ground up and all of my possessions. And that's assuming the insurance company is willing to work fairly with you on the replacement value.
Love Charlotte. Outage was a blip. We plan on buying 2nd home in HHI next couple years. Moved from the Midwest 14 years ago mai KY due to weather and would never go back, I get to see the sun in the winter down here..
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Old 12-24-2018, 09:21 AM
 
1,504 posts, read 521,183 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mr. Clutch View Post
Yeah I concur. I've lived in Houston a good chunk of my life as well and don't know of anyone leaving because of flooding. I'm sure there are a few people who are but its still not offsetting the number of people moving here overall.

Most people who live in the coastal southeast are not ignorant of hurricane risk - they simply accept that risk as a potential price of living where they want. Just like people in California accept earthquake and wildfire risks, or how people in the Midwest accept tornado risk. I don't see hurricanes affecting much at all in the long term.
Besides the flooding and hurricanes Houston and the Golf Coast have the best weather in the nation. Heat is better than the cold of the North. The summer rain and humidity beats the rainless, brutal summers of Inland California.
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Old 12-24-2018, 09:26 AM
 
Location: North Dakota
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The unbearable heat and humidity keep me out of the South. Hurricanes don't help though.
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Old 12-24-2018, 09:44 AM
 
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Yes, in an area prone to hurricanes. Water issues (lack, thereof), would also keep me out of Arizona (even though I love it), and other states with that potential issue. Cascadia Subduction Zone is, perhaps, a time bomb, as well. I kind of feel pretty safe in good ol' Wisconsin, AND, we have lots of water.
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Old 12-24-2018, 10:35 AM
 
Location: St Simons Island, GA
23,042 posts, read 35,003,509 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Enean View Post
Yes, in an area prone to hurricanes. Water issues (lack, thereof), would also keep me out of Arizona (even though I love it), and other states with that potential issue. Cascadia Subduction Zone is, perhaps, a time bomb, as well. I kind of feel pretty safe in good ol' Wisconsin, AND, we have lots of water.
Funny how many people think it's a given that folks migrate to Sunbelt states upon retirement, when in fact Wyoming, Delaware, Vermont and Maine are listed among the top 10 most popular retirement states*. Southern Delaware in particular is booming with new retirement communities; good friends of ours are bucking the trend, relocating there from Georgia in March.

And I agree with your sentiments regarding Wisconsin, one of the more consistently underrated states in terms of natural beauty.

*https://www.investopedia.com/article...-retire-us.asp
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Old 12-25-2018, 05:56 PM
 
Location: SoCal
3,767 posts, read 2,553,386 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Iconographer View Post
Funny how many people think it's a given that folks migrate to Sunbelt states upon retirement, when in fact Wyoming, Delaware, Vermont and Maine are listed among the top 10 most popular retirement states*. Southern Delaware in particular is booming with new retirement communities; good friends of ours are bucking the trend, relocating there from Georgia in March.

And I agree with your sentiments regarding Wisconsin, one of the more consistently underrated states in terms of natural beauty.

*https://www.investopedia.com/article...-retire-us.asp
Winch of those states has over 2 million people? Florida has added more people in the last 5 years than any one of those states entire population, it's safe to say the sunbelt is still the top destination!
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Old 12-25-2018, 07:00 PM
 
21,185 posts, read 30,343,833 times
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[/quote] Florida has added more people in the last 5 years than any one of those states entire population, it's safe to say the sunbelt is still the top destination![/quote]

They're not necessarily retirees however and would venture it's a combination of those able to sell much more expensive real estate elsewhere to make the move seem a good idea financially, those who still think mistakenly Florida is some kind of bargain due to the lack of state taxes, and a massive Puerto Rican population transitioning in. Many of the Baby Boomers also aren't keen on leaving behind more cultural opportunity in exchange for warm weather year round, muumuus and sandals.
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