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Old 10-14-2018, 03:59 PM
 
Location: Pure Michigan!
4,348 posts, read 7,427,733 times
Reputation: 6784

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We live in Michigan but own a beach condo in coastal SC. We were there a few weeks ago in the aftermath of Hurricane Florence and the subsequent flooding and mass destruction to property was almost beyond comprehension, probably comparable to that in the Houston area after Harvey, except that the areas hit in the Carolinas were not concentrated in a huge metropolitan area but more spread out between the two states.

The destruction that we saw...house after house after house up to its roof in flood water, crumbled roads, mosquito infestations caused by the hot, muggy weather and miles of standing water, entire housefuls of furniture and other belongings ruined, looting at night, and on and on was horrific and they will be years recovering from it, especially since only a very small number of people affected carried flood insurance on their homes, the others assuming that it could never be bad enough to get to them.

While we were there, we had the opportunity to speak to some people who had moved down there from the North for retirement or just a lower cost of living and beach living and many of them were second guessing their choice and talking about moving back home. I have also seen threads in the forums here on C-D where people who were considering a move to NC, SC, GA, coastal TX, or FL are now changing their minds and looking for alternatives or just planning on staying put with the idea that yes, they may have to deal with snow for part of the year, but that they now realize that that is nothing compared to living somewhere where a hurricane can destroy everything that you have, not to mention the inconvenience of having to evacuate, worry that you won't have anything to go back to, or deal with the clean up afterwards if your house was spared. In our case, our condo is on the 9th floor on the beach so yes, there is potential for hurricane damage if it really was a monster storm that hit the building head on, but no risk of flood damage and so far we have been very lucky. However, owning an insured 9th floor condo that we rent out most of the year is not the same as living there with all of our earthly possessions.

We have never seriously considered moving south, we love where we live and our entire extended families are here. Snowbirding? Maybe, possibly, but not moving there year round, and that was before all of these recent monster storms. We would most definitely never consider it now, not ever. The only natural disasters that will likely ever affect us here in our small Michigan town would be a possible tornado and even they are very few and far between here. Floods, hurricanes, earthquakes, and forest fires don't happen here.

In light of all of the recent destructive hurricanes (Harvey, Matthew, Irma, Florence, and Michael being only a few and all occurring in only the past 2-3 years), do you think this will affect the number of people moving/retiring to the coastal Southeast? Would it cause you to reconsider if you were thinking about it?
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Old 10-14-2018, 05:14 PM
 
Location: Tennessee
425 posts, read 294,638 times
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Seems to be mostly a coastal problem. Interior Southern States (or interior regions of many Southern States) don't have to worry about Storm surge, wind damage, hurricanes, etc.

Regardless, no, I don't think the Hurricanes will deter people from moving to the Southeast. Hurricanes have been around longer than we have.
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Old 10-14-2018, 05:18 PM
 
3,575 posts, read 1,378,440 times
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not as long as taxes remain low or absent.
hurricanes discourage overpopulation.
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Old 10-14-2018, 05:22 PM
 
Location: Pure Michigan!
4,348 posts, read 7,427,733 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by KY_Transplant View Post
Seems to be mostly a coastal problem. Interior Southern States (or interior regions of many Southern States) don't have to worry about Storm surge, wind damage, hurricanes, etc.

Regardless, no, I don't think the Hurricanes will deter people from moving to the Southeast. Hurricanes have been around longer than we have.
Well, some friends of mine who live in Charlotte and Winston-Salem both experienced lengthy power outages and torrential rain and mild flooding from Hurricane Michael this past week and they are not really near the coast so it does have some effect on the interior areas.

Also, I agree that hurricanes have been around longer than we have, but they seem to be getting worse in terms of damage and definitely more frequent in recent years. It seems like it's a rare year anymore where the Southeastern U.S. doesn't see at least one super destructive storm and more people are living on the coast than ever so the potential for damage is so much worse as well.
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Old 10-14-2018, 05:26 PM
 
Location: Pure Michigan!
4,348 posts, read 7,427,733 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by turkeydance View Post
not as long as taxes remain low or absent.
hurricanes discourage overpopulation.
Even with low taxes and good home insurance in place, it still wouldn't be worth it to me to face having to replace my home from the ground up and all of my possessions. And that's assuming the insurance company is willing to work fairly with you on the replacement value.
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Old 10-14-2018, 05:29 PM
 
Location: Lizard Lick, NC
6,141 posts, read 2,848,086 times
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Lmao... funny thing is there hasn’t been an increase in hurricanes. Opposite would be more true actually. All that’s happened is more people from up north have moved in so the media pays attention now since there’s more people.
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Old 10-14-2018, 05:32 PM
 
Location: Pure Michigan!
4,348 posts, read 7,427,733 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by muslim12 View Post
Lmao... funny thing is there hasnít been an increase in hurricanes. Opposite would be more true actually. All thatís happened is more people from up north have moved in so the media pays attention now since thereís more people.
Interesting, and you're right, we hear about hurricanes and their widespread destruction more now than ever before.
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Old 10-14-2018, 05:48 PM
 
Location: St Simons Island, GA
23,104 posts, read 35,052,903 times
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There have been numerous hurricanes in the Southeast over the last 50 years, and yet the diaspora continues.
So, to answer your question...no.
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Old 10-14-2018, 06:01 PM
 
3,622 posts, read 1,209,223 times
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I agree with everyone else. The positives of living in the Southeast still greatly outweight the negatives from occasional hurricanes.

BTW, sans Miami (I don't consider Houston a part of the SE), the fastest growing cities in the Southeast are in the Piedmont and Cumberland Plateau, not along the coasts. With maybe exception to the Great Lakes, this is traditionally the safest region in the US from natural disasters / extreme weather and IMO, it has the most ideal climate for people who like a lot of sunshine and 4 seasons.
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Old 10-14-2018, 06:04 PM
 
Location: Illinois
260 posts, read 115,068 times
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I don't understand how people are still able to insure their homes down there.
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