U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S.
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 10-18-2018, 06:13 PM
 
Location: Chibostoncaliseattle
2,081 posts, read 1,099,257 times
Reputation: 1846

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by cpomp View Post
Where are you going to put a strip mall in Boston?? That would also be a travesty for Boston.
It’s not even a lack of space/land open for development. It’s state and local governing that is utterly and completely opposed to commercial activity outside of select pockets. NIMBYism, and the housing shortage manifest into residential development or no development at all. Besides, towns of 30k will not allow drive throughs, let alone traditional strip malls. The Dunkin Donuts in metro west towns are largely brick facade with white lettering. It’s aesthetically great, but can be super inconvenient at times.

When an opportunity does arise for commercial development, it’s massive news. New home buyers want convenience, and combined with proximity to Boston, the towns/cities willing to bend on development have seen an influx of affluence. Assembly Square is a great example- Home prices in a 10 mile radius sky rocketed above the normal rate of growth simply because of the shiny, new mixed-use development.

The funny thing? This kind of development is a dime a dozen in Chicagoland. Convenience is the first thing I think of when I talk about the Chicagoland. The downside is that it can be a major eyesoar, and business turnover is staggering.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 10-19-2018, 05:43 AM
 
21,180 posts, read 30,336,326 times
Reputation: 19590
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bobdreamz View Post
I thought Miami was bad but Orlando is grotesque in this regard.
It gets worse to the north in nearby Seminole county where it's basically nothing but 95% strip malls.
I know you have a thing about Seminole County, but that's simply not true and you should perhaps explore a bit further before making such sweeping generalizations. While it's happening in Seminole County for sure there's far more happening in Orange County (Orlando) with such shining examples as the Alafaya Trail, Colonial Drive, International Drive, Narcoosee Road and Lee Vista Blvd corridors as recent examples of green space devastation.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-19-2018, 05:55 AM
 
1,027 posts, read 1,257,104 times
Reputation: 1228
I agree with Badger, DFW is the king of strip malls. Texas would win this 'honor' if it could be measured scientifically.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-19-2018, 08:23 AM
 
Location: Clemson, SC by way of Tyler,TX
4,839 posts, read 2,973,256 times
Reputation: 3384
Quote:
Originally Posted by Campeador View Post
I agree with Badger, DFW is the king of strip malls. Texas would win this 'honor' if it could be measured scientifically.
I bet it could....but I don't have the energy.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-19-2018, 08:58 AM
 
Location: St Simons Island, GA
23,035 posts, read 34,995,637 times
Reputation: 15172
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gaylord_Focker View Post
I bet it could....but I don't have the energy.
Which is why one can get away with such presumptions.
Los Angeles is no slouch in this category, BTW.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-19-2018, 09:08 AM
 
Location: St Simons Island, GA
23,035 posts, read 34,995,637 times
Reputation: 15172
Quote:
Originally Posted by cpomp View Post
How on earth was my statement insane? Put your pro Dallas agenda aside and call a spade a spade.

Highland Park Village is hardly representative of the Dallas aesthetic.
I didn't quote you; I quoted Badger. And I said inane, not insane. Look 'em up.
No city's built environment is an all or nothing proposition, including Dallas.
And why would I have a "Dallas Agenda"? I've no dog in that fight. Just trying to keep it honest.

Last edited by Iconographer; 10-19-2018 at 09:20 AM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-19-2018, 10:37 AM
 
Location: East of the Sun, West of the Moon
15,504 posts, read 17,716,813 times
Reputation: 30786
Strip malls go in where modern suburbs (post-WWII) go in.

You have an old city center with an old farm road leading out of town to where the farms used to be. Then you build some sprawly low-density suburban developments way out on the farm fields, too far to be convenient for downtown shopping, so you plop down some strip malls on the old farm road.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-22-2018, 03:09 PM
 
Location: Buffalo, NY
605 posts, read 361,996 times
Reputation: 877
Quote:
Originally Posted by jennifat View Post
I think it's more the lack of suburbia rather than deliberate planning.
Moreso that, yes, but there are Vermont municipalities that are anti-strip malls. I remember when I was in Stowe as a kid, the McDonald's there was the nicest McD's I'd ever seen, as it had to conform to a rigid aesthetic code. No traditional golden arches allowed. Pretty sure billboards are banned in the entire state, so although that's only tangentially related, I think that might give an indication about VT priorities....
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-23-2018, 09:53 AM
 
7 posts, read 4,253 times
Reputation: 23
Lifestyle Statistics > Shopping Malls > Total number (most recent) by state
DEFINITION: Number shopping malls. Includes regional and super-regional centers, enclosed or outdoor.


VIEW DATA: Totals Per capita
Definition Source Printable version
Bar Graph Pie Chart Map

Showing latest available data.
Rank States Amount
# 1 California: 6,379
# 2 Florida: 3,839
# 3 Texas: 3,325
# 4 Illinois: 2,358
# 5 New York: 1,871
# 6 Ohio: 1,860
# 7 North Carolina: 1,839
# 8 Georgia: 1,817
# 9 Pennsylvania: 1,800
# 10 Virginia: 1,394
# 11 New Jersey: 1,381
New Jerseyan Lifestyle


# 12 Tennessee: 1,275
# 13 Arizona: 1,237
# 14 Michigan: 1,162
# 15 Massachusetts: 1,043
# 16 Indiana: 1,008
# 17 Missouri: 1,005
# 18 Maryland: 988
# 19 South Carolina: 905
# 20 Colorado: 893
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-24-2018, 07:51 PM
 
Location: Minneapolis, MN
6,053 posts, read 3,377,056 times
Reputation: 7690
Quote:
Originally Posted by Iconographer View Post
You specifically referred to DFW in its totality. Too late for dissembling.

If I was referring to Dallas, I woulda said Dallas. And even then most of Dallas ain't that special. Fort Worth is a lot more charming.


With that being said, a city/metro area can still have a unique shopping district while still having a lot of strip malls. Coconut Grove or Coral Gables doesn't erase the generic strip malls that make up a huge chunk of Southwest Miami, for example. I'd also say that South Florida is FULL of strip malls.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S.
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top