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Old 10-15-2018, 12:54 PM
 
Location: New Jersey
941 posts, read 412,387 times
Reputation: 460

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I've visited California a couple of times in my life and I realized that the state has so many strip mall where there is strip mall after strip mall. It just seems to repeat itself. I live in New Jersey and there are many businesses that have their own building, but we have a lot of strip malls. The good strip malls are what make some of NJ's neighborhoods great for children under 17 who cannot drive on their own yet. There are some crappy strip malls in NJ with not so great places. California has an extremely high population that so many people own business and obviously strip malls are dense. Imagine how much land would be eaten up if you took apart every strip mall in California and turn every business into their own building. California has the most strip malls ever in my opinion.
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Old 10-15-2018, 01:09 PM
 
1,583 posts, read 2,013,639 times
Reputation: 3332
California, Texas and Florida due to the sheer size of those states and the number of metro areas with sprawling suburbs. New Jersey probably has the greatest density of strip malls.
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Old 10-15-2018, 01:22 PM
 
608 posts, read 434,721 times
Reputation: 666
There's a strip mall on every strip in Texas
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Old 10-15-2018, 01:24 PM
 
4,988 posts, read 7,303,015 times
Reputation: 7956
Probably sunbelt states or states that have had high population growth starting in the 80s. Florida, Texas, Arizona, California. . They all have that sunbelt suburbia development, which is strip mall friendly, unlike the northeast, which already was largely developed by the time the concept of a strip mall became ubiquitous. Tho, the northeast does have it's fair share of strip malls too a la DC suburbs
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Old 10-15-2018, 02:26 PM
 
Location: 3219'03.7"N 10643'55.9"W
8,114 posts, read 17,318,097 times
Reputation: 7281
On the other hand, Vermont would win for the least. And God bless the regional and city planners for that.
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Old 10-15-2018, 02:57 PM
 
21,180 posts, read 30,336,326 times
Reputation: 19590
Florida, hands down. They can't mow down trees fast enough here in the Orlando area to keep with the "demand" of yet another strip mall soon to be occupied by such exclusive tenants as a nail salon, Subway, wireless phone store, check cashing store and if lucky a pizza delivery chain.
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Old 10-15-2018, 02:58 PM
 
Location: Minneapolis, Minnesota
1,374 posts, read 1,193,115 times
Reputation: 2537
Quote:
Originally Posted by mike0421 View Post
On the other hand, Vermont would win for the least. And God bless the regional and city planners for that.
I think it's more the lack of suburbia rather than deliberate planning.
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Old 10-15-2018, 04:49 PM
_OT
 
Location: Miami
2,141 posts, read 1,517,587 times
Reputation: 1843
Texas, and I don't think it's close.

You have strip malls inside of strip malls.
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Old 10-15-2018, 06:39 PM
 
Location: Wonderland
44,651 posts, read 36,106,549 times
Reputation: 63181
Quote:
Originally Posted by mike0421 View Post
On the other hand, Vermont would win for the least. And God bless the regional and city planners for that.
And the low population, low birthrate and high median age - Vermont is pretty (some seasons) but it's not booming.

Vermont is the 3rd "oldest" state.
https://www.census.gov/newsroom/pres.../cb17-100.html


It's one of the slowest growing states economically.
https://247wallst.com/special-report...est-growing/4/

It's ranked 49 out of 50 states for birth rate.
https://www.businessinsider.com/cdc-...h-rates-2014-5
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Old 10-15-2018, 06:49 PM
 
1,639 posts, read 1,565,039 times
Reputation: 1195
California, Texas, Florida,. . . in that order. This is one of those things that is difficult, yet not impossible to approximate. I wouldn't even begin to know how though.
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