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Old 10-18-2018, 03:49 PM
 
Location: Heart of Dixie
712 posts, read 399,105 times
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What about NH's ties to Boston. SE NH, where most people live in NH, feels just like Boston.
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Old 10-18-2018, 03:59 PM
 
1,110 posts, read 401,322 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BostonBornMassMade View Post
I can only concede that rural Southern and Notthern NE are the same l, you can toss southern NH into Southern NE. But the day to day lived experience I think is pretty different. Seeing as most people live in the urban areas and the density is a major part of life for most in Southern NE.
Come on Boston Born, you have to get out of Boston and north of 128 there is another world north of Rt 495.
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Old 10-18-2018, 07:31 PM
Status: "Got the rocking modern neon sound" (set 14 days ago)
 
Location: Boston
2,046 posts, read 1,998,541 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BostonBornMassMade View Post
I know lots of places in NY and NJ and am there frequently. The urban population of NE moves southward. Going North is always a waste of time/money because there is no reason to be up there.
Iím all for using anecdotes to enhance an argument, but this is ridiculous. Just because something is true for you doesnít mean it is for a majority of people!
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Old 10-18-2018, 08:16 PM
 
Location: Minneapolis, MN
6,061 posts, read 3,393,954 times
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You could literally argue this about every other region. More so than New England. South Florida is very different from Northern Kentucky. Still the Southeast. Northern Minnesota is quite different from the Missouri bootheel. Still the Midwest.


New England is the smallest region in the nation and has the most regional homogeneity. Followed by probably the Mid-Atlantic. (In terms of geography, urban landscape, climate, not population) All of New England gets fall colours, snow in winter, all of New England is geographically small and close to each other, its all got a historic colonial past, etc.
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Old 10-18-2018, 09:16 PM
 
Location: northern Vermont - previously NM, WA, & MA
9,434 posts, read 18,347,278 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by btownboss4 View Post
Idk what the hell you're talking about literally everyone I know goes North far more than they go South (even including the Cape as South) Clearly tons of people do it there is like a 12 mile Backup Sunday Afternoond on 95 in NH during the Summer. Same on 93. People go Skiing, to the lakes/Miuntins/Ocean very frequently.
84/90 generally has a to Boston flow that breaks up around 495/290 which indicates it’s mostly NYers/NJians going North.

The “white” Demographic is still the vast majority in Sputhern New England it’s not like their habits are some minute fraction.
I've found the vacation split mentality in New England tends to be whichever side of the O'Neil tunnel one lives on. People on the North Shore and Merrimack Valley would rather drive way up into deep Maine to getaway, rather than deal with having to drive through Boston on 128 to get to the Cape. I've found most people south of Boston gravitate more towards the Cape and RI.

Quote:
Originally Posted by UnderTheLiveOaks View Post
Out of curiosity, op, do you think other regions are uniform? Like, do you think the South or the Midwest is homogeneous and cohesive throughout?
This it what amuses me about this thread. The OP is making the case of the supposed stark north/south divisions within the region, much of it just boils down to urban and rural divisions, just as was pointed out earlier in the thread about the divisions between Upstate and downstate NY. These exist all over the country in so many different factions. Many areas are fragmented in states as large as New England itself. Washington State has more topographical, geographical, climate, and political differences than northern and southern New England do. Just the architecture alone that is uniformly New England in all six states have more commonality when compared with the architecture in NY and Mid Atlantic. They all have that New England look about them.

Quote:
Originally Posted by BostonBornMassMade View Post
There is no Italian Ice/Coffee Milk/Red Wine and Vinegar on fries in Northern NE.
Poutine is popular in Northern NE, not Southern NE.
Dunkin Donuts is much more popular in Southern NE.
Hannaford is strictly Northern NE.
Maple Syrup is Vermont's thing.

t.
You can definitely get vinegar on fries in costal Maine. That shouldn't come as any surprise.

Dunkin Donuts is obviously more popular in Northern New England than anywhere else. What are their other options? It's not Seattle, and they don't really go for Starbucks. It's as much of a New England thing up there as anywhere else in the region.

There's a Hanaford in West Peabody, MA I use to shop at, so wouldn't say strictly Northern NE.

Most of the farmers markets I have visited in Mass have Massachusetts maple syrup, you know... because there's maple trees to be tapped there. There is a world outside the cities and burbs of Mass too, that exist within Mass.

Last edited by Desert_SW_77; 10-18-2018 at 09:49 PM..
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Old 10-18-2018, 09:33 PM
 
1,593 posts, read 835,425 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BadgerFilms View Post
You could literally argue this about every other region. More so than New England. South Florida is very different from Northern Kentucky. Still the Southeast. Northern Minnesota is quite different from the Missouri bootheel. Still the Midwest.


New England is the smallest region in the nation and has the most regional homogeneity. Followed by probably the Mid-Atlantic. (In terms of geography, urban landscape, climate, not population) All of New England gets fall colours, snow in winter, all of New England is geographically small and close to each other, its all got a historic colonial past, etc.
Thank You for ending this thread.
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Old 10-19-2018, 06:26 AM
 
Location: Boston
2,257 posts, read 1,315,931 times
Reputation: 2084
Quote:
Originally Posted by Desert_SW_77 View Post
I've found the vacation split mentality in New England tends to be whichever side of the O'Neil tunnel one lives on. People on the North Shore and Merrimack Valley would rather drive way up into deep Maine to getaway, rather than deal with having to drive through Boston on 128 to get to the Cape. I've found most people south of Boston gravitate more towards the Cape and RI.



This it what amuses me about this thread. The OP is making the case of the supposed stark north/south divisions within the region, much of it just boils down to urban and rural divisions, just as was pointed out earlier in the thread about the divisions between Upstate and downstate NY. These exist all over the country in so many different factions. Many areas are fragmented in states as large as New England itself. Washington State has more topographical, geographical, climate, and political differences than northern and southern New England do. Just the architecture alone that is uniformly New England in all six states have more commonality when compared with the architecture in NY and Mid Atlantic. They all have that New England look about them.



You can definitely get vinegar on fries in costal Maine. That shouldn't come as any surprise.

Dunkin Donuts is obviously more popular in Northern New England than anywhere else. What are their other options? It's not Seattle, and they don't really go for Starbucks. It's as much of a New England thing up there as anywhere else in the region.

There's a Hanaford in West Peabody, MA I use to shop at, so wouldn't say strictly Northern NE.

Most of the farmers markets I have visited in Mass have Massachusetts maple syrup, you know... because there's maple trees to be tapped there. There is a world outside the cities and burbs of Mass too, that exist within Mass.
Aren’t people South of Boston the vast majority of Southern NE though? I never really said NE doesnt have strong identification and history. I just feel like there is a clear split that should be recognized more-it’s not to say there’s nothing New England but on the whole and in practical life -very different. Also I never said Southern NE was an extension of NY/NJ . It’s more of just it’s own thing but I am surprised at the strong reaction in the thread in general but my question has been answered.
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Old 10-19-2018, 07:08 AM
 
Location: Pittsburgh, PA (Morningside)
12,439 posts, read 11,941,006 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cjoseph View Post
What about NH's ties to Boston. SE NH, where most people live in NH, feels just like Boston.
IIRC more people live in New Hampshire who were born in Massachusetts than were born in-state!
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Old 10-19-2018, 07:39 AM
 
Location: Lakeland, Florida
6,973 posts, read 12,496,612 times
Reputation: 8734
Counties. All of New England has counties.
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Old 10-19-2018, 08:17 AM
 
161 posts, read 181,799 times
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I agree that most US regions have a lot of differing areas within them. I lived in RI and MA for three years and definitely noticed Southern versus northern New England have different demographics and economy's. That said, the state's within those regions are also very different. CT RI and MA all have different vibes and so do VT NH and ME.
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