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Old 10-19-2018, 10:26 AM
Status: "Got the rocking modern neon sound" (set 9 days ago)
 
Location: Boston
2,038 posts, read 1,991,711 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tarheel84 View Post
That said, the state's within those regions are also very different. CT RI and MA all have different vibes and so do VT NH and ME.
Imo, the difference in culture between VT and NH is the starkest of any in New England.
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Old 10-19-2018, 10:40 AM
 
Location: East of the Sun, West of the Moon
15,504 posts, read 17,732,432 times
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Why de we say sirloin and chuck are both beef? They are completely different!
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Old 10-19-2018, 11:31 AM
 
Location: Pittsburgh, PA (Morningside)
12,419 posts, read 11,923,391 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by iAMtheVVALRUS View Post
Imo, the difference in culture between VT and NH is the starkest of any in New England.
Yes and no. Southeastern New Hampshire - areas like Keene and Claremont - are very liberal and culturally similar to Vermont. And the Northeast Kingdom portion of Vermont is very similar to northern New Hampshire.

I remember seeing a study years back which pointed out that the only reason why New Hampshire has stayed so GOP leaning was Massachusetts transplants who fled across the border for lower taxes. People born in New Hampshire actually lean left. Without the Massachusetts influence the state wouldn't be as left wing as Vermont, but it would be much less conservative - more akin to Maine overall.
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Old 10-19-2018, 11:56 AM
 
Location: On the Great South Bay
7,132 posts, read 9,905,553 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jimrob1 View Post
Counties. All of New England has counties.
Yes, but some have actual functioning county governments and some are just on paper. Even the functioning county governments are on the weak side with limited powers, at least compared to county governments in the South and the West. In all 6 states, the City and the Town (civil township) are the primary forms of local government.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Civil_township

Breakdown by state

Connecticut
County - NO County governments
Boroughs - Connecticut has incorporated boroughs inside some of her towns
NOTE: Despite the name, a Connecticut borough is not the same as a borough in the 3 Upper Mid-Atlantic states

Rhode Island
County - NO County governments

Massachusetts
County - Most counties do not have governments but some do (Dukes, Barnstable, Plymouth, Bristol).
NOTE: Thus regarding counties, Massachusetts is sort of a hybrid between southern and northern New England.

Vermont
County governments - limited functions by national standards
Villages - Vermont has New York State type incorporated villages inside some of her towns.
Unincorporated areas - Vermont has a few including gores
NOTE: limited counties, stronger towns and some villages, is similar to neighboring New York

New Hampshire

County governments - limited functions by national standards
Unincorporated areas - a few

Maine

County governments - Limited??? (not sure)
Plantations - Maine has a unique form of local government for areas to small to be a Town
Unincorporated areas - Maine has the majority of New England's unincorporated areas, including gores
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gore_(surveying)
NOTE: Most of New England is incorporated (part of a city or town), so unlike most of the country it is rare to be unincorporated in New England. The unincorporated exceptions are in northern New England, especially in Maine.
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Old 10-19-2018, 01:39 PM
 
Location: Boston
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jimrob1 View Post
Counties. All of New England has counties.
Not really
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Old 10-19-2018, 02:22 PM
 
419 posts, read 128,193 times
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All of New England is like the size of a state west of the Mississippi. It's close together, and has more in common with itself than the rest of the country.

I could lay out all the ways different parts of my home state (Iowa) are different from each other and make it look like there are dramatic differences (in some ways, there are) but when looking at the country as a whole those differences don't stand out at all. Same thing goes for New England, I suppose.
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Old 10-19-2018, 02:42 PM
 
9,381 posts, read 9,539,690 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BostonBornMassMade View Post
Not really
Almost 1/2 of Massachusetts Counties have governments, Dukes, Barnstable, Hamphire, Berkshire, Franklin, Plymouth and Kinda sorta Nantucket.
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Old 10-19-2018, 03:00 PM
Status: "Got the rocking modern neon sound" (set 9 days ago)
 
Location: Boston
2,038 posts, read 1,991,711 times
Reputation: 1730
Quote:
Originally Posted by eschaton View Post
Yes and no. Southeastern New Hampshire - areas like Keene and Claremont - are very liberal and culturally similar to Vermont. And the Northeast Kingdom portion of Vermont is very similar to northern New Hampshire.

I remember seeing a study years back which pointed out that the only reason why New Hampshire has stayed so GOP leaning was Massachusetts transplants who fled across the border for lower taxes. People born in New Hampshire actually lean left. Without the Massachusetts influence the state wouldn't be as left wing as Vermont, but it would be much less conservative - more akin to Maine overall.
All fair and interesting points. Nice post!

Id love to see that study if you have some way of finding it.
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Old 10-19-2018, 07:13 PM
 
Location: northern Vermont - previously NM, WA, & MA
9,427 posts, read 18,327,828 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by IowanFarmer View Post
All of New England is like the size of a state west of the Mississippi. It's close together, and has more in common with itself than the rest of the country.

I could lay out all the ways different parts of my home state (Iowa) are different from each other and make it look like there are dramatic differences (in some ways, there are) but when looking at the country as a whole those differences don't stand out at all. Same thing goes for New England, I suppose.
Having lived in four states, including most if my life in New England I see a more macro point of view, particularly when in comparison to cultural and geographical divisions in big and dynamic states like Texas or California. The differences the OP points out just don't seem that stark to me.

Quote:
Originally Posted by eschaton View Post

I remember seeing a study years back which pointed out that the only reason why New Hampshire has stayed so GOP leaning was Massachusetts transplants who fled across the border for lower taxes. People born in New Hampshire actually lean left. Without the Massachusetts influence the state wouldn't be as left wing as Vermont, but it would be much less conservative - more akin to Maine overall.
Accurate! I can get definitely behind this. Also in the same sense transplants from the tri states NY/NJ/CT have influenced Vermont in a much more liberal way than previous generations of Vermonters had ever known.

Last edited by Desert_SW_77; 10-19-2018 at 07:46 PM..
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Old 10-20-2018, 09:28 AM
 
7,600 posts, read 9,450,003 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by iAMtheVVALRUS View Post
Imo, the difference in culture between VT and NH is the starkest of any in New England.
In one sense, VT and ME have more in common than VT and NH. Someone from another region in America might think that NH and VT are "twins", but culturally-speaking, they have , at times, very different vibes...
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