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Old 10-19-2018, 11:19 AM
 
Location: New Jersey
945 posts, read 417,935 times
Reputation: 460

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Quote:
Originally Posted by jennifat View Post
Maybe in the Borg-colonized future version of Earth. You've never driven through eastern Colorado, I assume? This is the view one sees across the entire eastern section of the state:

https://www.google.com/maps/@39.2943...7i13312!8i6656

https://www.google.com/maps/@40.2075...7i13312!8i6656

https://www.google.com/maps/@37.2792...7i13312!8i6656

The emptiness is sort of majestic in a way, but not exactly interesting.
The first link is the worst. The second link is bad too, but the snow on the ground is the only good thing. Third one is the best, because of the slight colorfulness. All three links are boring though. Imagine driving through the Midwest (excluding the desert parts of it), but the Midwest would be worse, since the Midwest is so green.
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Old 10-19-2018, 11:41 AM
 
Location: New Mexico
6,633 posts, read 3,696,925 times
Reputation: 12464
Quote:
Originally Posted by potanta View Post
It seems like people think the two states are equally beautiful.
I don't think you can rank beauty in this context. Both states have jaw-dropping landscapes...as does any state in the west. It depends on what you like. I prefer New Mexico. If I want crowds and higher mountain vistas I'd go to Colorado. If I want crowds and the Grand Canyon I'd go to Arizona. Everything else I can get closer to home.
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Old 10-19-2018, 12:08 PM
 
Location: New Jersey
945 posts, read 417,935 times
Reputation: 460
Quote:
Originally Posted by SunGrins View Post
I don't think you can rank beauty in this context. Both states have jaw-dropping landscapes...as does any state in the west. It depends on what you like. I prefer New Mexico. If I want crowds and higher mountain vistas I'd go to Colorado. If I want crowds and the Grand Canyon I'd go to Arizona. Everything else I can get closer to home.
New Mexico isn't really my favorite choice of where I would want to live, because New Mexico is a bit too sparse for me. As a young person, I want to be around humans and have a social life, so I'd rather pick Arizona over New Mexico. Although I haven't been to New Mexico, Arizona's scenery and diverse landscapes just seems to excite me based on what people talk, and plus Arizona has more suburbanization and urbanization for humans to live around. Not all of Arizona is hot thankfully.
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Old 10-19-2018, 01:06 PM
 
Location: 32°19'03.7"N 106°43'55.9"W
8,118 posts, read 17,347,303 times
Reputation: 7297
Quote:
Originally Posted by potanta View Post
New Mexico isn't really my favorite choice of where I would want to live, because New Mexico is a bit too sparse for me. As a young person, I want to be around humans and have a social life, so I'd rather pick Arizona over New Mexico. Although I haven't been to New Mexico, Arizona's scenery and diverse landscapes just seems to excite me based on what people talk, and plus Arizona has more suburbanization and urbanization for humans to live around. Not all of Arizona is hot thankfully.
Go to Central Ave in Albuquerque, or Nob Hill. While New Mexico as a whole might be sparse, Bernalillo County is an urban area just as Maricopa County in Arizona, or Denver proper. When it comes to western states, once you leave the cities, everything is sparse. Consider Hinsdale County Colorado, the size of Rhode Island but with 850 people in it. Many years ago I drove from Dolores Colorado to Lone Cone, and did not see another soul for almost 60 miles. That's like driving from Blairstown NJ to the George Washington Bridge. There are many areas in Arizona that I can name that are laid out the same exact way.
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Old 10-19-2018, 01:39 PM
 
Location: Aurora, CO
6,572 posts, read 10,302,750 times
Reputation: 9844
Quote:
Originally Posted by T. Damon View Post
Colorado has intensely dramatic scenery in the western third of the state but the eastern 2/3 is nothing but (kinda) rolling prairie. It doesn’t look any different than neighboring Nebraska. I’ve driven through it many times. Arizona, while being mostly desert, has I think consistently more dramatic scenery. It has some great mountain ranges and the rock formations throughout the desert are fantastic, even as it too has stretches of flat and pretty boring landscape (mostly desert and some farmland).
Not to be too pedantic, but your fractions are reversed. 40% of the state is prairie.
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Old 10-19-2018, 02:35 PM
 
Location: East of the Sun, West of the Moon
15,541 posts, read 17,783,363 times
Reputation: 30911
Quote:
Originally Posted by potanta View Post
New Mexico isn't really my favorite choice of where I would want to live, because New Mexico is a bit too sparse for me. As a young person, I want to be around humans and have a social life, so I'd rather pick Arizona over New Mexico. Although I haven't been to New Mexico, Arizona's scenery and diverse landscapes just seems to excite me based on what people talk, and plus Arizona has more suburbanization and urbanization for humans to live around. Not all of Arizona is hot thankfully.
The parts with the vibrant, youthful social life are the hottest parts of the state.
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Old 10-19-2018, 02:47 PM
 
Location: Minneapolis, Minnesota
1,381 posts, read 1,201,145 times
Reputation: 2551
Quote:
Originally Posted by potanta View Post
The first link is the worst. The second link is bad too, but the snow on the ground is the only good thing. Third one is the best, because of the slight colorfulness. All three links are boring though. Imagine driving through the Midwest (excluding the desert parts of it), but the Midwest would be worse, since the Midwest is so green.
You consistently make zero sense at all.
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Old 10-19-2018, 02:58 PM
 
Location: 32°19'03.7"N 106°43'55.9"W
8,118 posts, read 17,347,303 times
Reputation: 7297
For Potanta, hopefully these maps help demonstrate that the population density in New Mexico, on the aggregate, is much in line with Arizona and Colorado. I made the blue areas anything less than 5 persons per square mile. As you can see, that is roughly 90% land cover of all three western states.

Arizona:



Colorado:



And New Mexico:



Contrast my home state New Jersey to the other 3:



No way I could ever move back to New Jersey.
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Old 10-19-2018, 04:12 PM
 
Location: Nantahala National Forest, NC
27,093 posts, read 5,950,493 times
Reputation: 30347
Both are beautiful but the most dramatic would be the Arizona desert.
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Old 10-19-2018, 08:14 PM
 
Location: New Jersey
945 posts, read 417,935 times
Reputation: 460
Quote:
Originally Posted by mike0421 View Post
Go to Central Ave in Albuquerque, or Nob Hill. While New Mexico as a whole might be sparse, Bernalillo County is an urban area just as Maricopa County in Arizona, or Denver proper. When it comes to western states, once you leave the cities, everything is sparse. Consider Hinsdale County Colorado, the size of Rhode Island but with 850 people in it. Many years ago I drove from Dolores Colorado to Lone Cone, and did not see another soul for almost 60 miles. That's like driving from Blairstown NJ to the George Washington Bridge. There are many areas in Arizona that I can name that are laid out the same exact way.
I know you've probably seen my username before where I've written about living in a semi-rural area. I like the sparseness of the Western states due to the beautiful nature and beautiful scenery around it. I just don't want to live extremely far from civilization. Now I would love to live in a neighborhood similar to Blairstown where it's in a semi-rural area and not too far from civilization. No part of North Jersey is too rural and too far from civilization except for one part I've seen on my way to Lancaster one time.
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