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Old 10-27-2018, 09:38 AM
 
Location: Wonderland
44,825 posts, read 36,186,607 times
Reputation: 63484

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Quote:
Originally Posted by NOVA_guy View Post
Yep, I've always said this. If you compare the data and raw facts, there's a reason places with high cost of living are expensive. Obviously they offer a high quality of life and access to abundance of resources that are not easy to find, otherwise it wouldn't be expensive.

The trade off is worth it because you're going to have access to more jobs, higher earning potential, access for your kids to go to highly rated schools, etc. You get what you pay for.
Right and if you don't rely on a location for your career and earnings, if you no longer have school aged kids, or don't have kids yet, or may never have kids, etc. then these things simply are not part of your daily life.

My husband and I make a very comfortable living, and we're able to save substantially for retirement as well as spend a lot of discretionary income. He could literally live anywhere in the world as long as there was good access to an international airport - and we choose not to live in a large metro area. We live NEAR one (an hour and a half from Dallas) but we rarely even go to Dallas or Fort Worth, maybe a few times a year. We only go when we want to go, and thankfully we don't have to deal with the negatives (and we consider huge metro areas to have more negatives than positives, but that's just us) on a daily basis, or even once a month.

We can travel anywhere we want any time we want, and we do so. We eat out, in nice locally owned restaurants, many of which are "ethnic," or "farm to table" throughout the week. We don't care a thing about a bar scene so we don't miss that - for all we know, there could be all sorts of bars in our smaller metro area but we just don't know or care about them. We regularly attend concerts and other venues - both in our smaller metro or in larger metros nearby.

The expendable income is really nice. Meanwhile, we enjoy a lower cost of living every single day - along with our large, comfortable home and yard and outdoor living area.

So to us, no, the tradeoff is not worth it. YMMV and that's OK too. Personally I'm glad that other people choose to live and work in big metro areas because I like the very occasional perks we find in a large metro area, but I don't have to live there!
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Old 10-27-2018, 10:21 AM
 
1,705 posts, read 1,366,887 times
Reputation: 1753
Quote:
Originally Posted by KathrynAragon View Post
Right and if you don't rely on a location for your career and earnings, if you no longer have school aged kids, or don't have kids yet, or may never have kids, etc. then these things simply are not part of your daily life.

My husband and I make a very comfortable living, and we're able to save substantially for retirement as well as spend a lot of discretionary income. He could literally live anywhere in the world as long as there was good access to an international airport - and we choose not to live in a large metro area. We live NEAR one (an hour and a half from Dallas) but we rarely even go to Dallas or Fort Worth, maybe a few times a year. We only go when we want to go, and thankfully we don't have to deal with the negatives (and we consider huge metro areas to have more negatives than positives, but that's just us) on a daily basis, or even once a month.

We can travel anywhere we want any time we want, and we do so. We eat out, in nice locally owned restaurants, many of which are "ethnic," or "farm to table" throughout the week. We don't care a thing about a bar scene so we don't miss that - for all we know, there could be all sorts of bars in our smaller metro area but we just don't know or care about them. We regularly attend concerts and other venues - both in our smaller metro or in larger metros nearby.

The expendable income is really nice. Meanwhile, we enjoy a lower cost of living every single day - along with our large, comfortable home and yard and outdoor living area.

So to us, no, the tradeoff is not worth it. YMMV and that's OK too. Personally I'm glad that other people choose to live and work in big metro areas because I like the very occasional perks we find in a large metro area, but I don't have to live there!
True, good point -- it just depends on what field you work in, your personality, your interests, etc. I don't think living in a low CoL area is a bad thing but I think depending on your situation it may not always be beneficial once you delve into the details but the caveat being it depends on your situation.
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Old 10-27-2018, 10:26 AM
 
Location: Wonderland
44,825 posts, read 36,186,607 times
Reputation: 63484
Quote:
Originally Posted by NOVA_guy View Post
True, good point -- it just depends on what field you work in, your personality, your interests, etc. I don't think living in a low CoL area is a bad thing but I think depending on your situation it may not always be beneficial once you delve into the details but the caveat being it depends on your situation.
Absolutely.

I think people need to really research areas before they willy nilly just move there. Visit, several times, not just the "best" seasons. Look closely at anything that's important to you - whether it's schools, commute, shopping, sports, outdoor activities, whatever. Don't just make assumptions based on COL - that would be ridiculous on either end of the scale for that matter.

Lots of people love all sorts of types of living and types of cities and towns (and rural areas) that simply don't appeal to other people. COL does play a big role, but not necessarily the role people think it plays.
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Old 10-27-2018, 11:39 AM
 
29,944 posts, read 27,386,421 times
Reputation: 18522
Quote:
Originally Posted by NOVA_guy View Post
Yep, I've always said this. If you compare the data and raw facts, there's a reason places with high cost of living are expensive. Obviously they offer a high quality of life and access to abundance of resources that are not easy to find, otherwise it wouldn't be expensive.

The trade off is worth it because you're going to have access to more jobs, higher earning potential, access for your kids to go to highly rated schools, etc. You get what you pay for.
A lot of so-called boutique cities are exceptions to this. They are niched, attracting people who desire a certain type of lifestyle, but the local economy skews heavily towards lower-wage service sector jobs (retail, restaurants, hospitality) and the housing supply isn't keeping pace with growth which drives up the cost of housing especially and the cost of living overall.

Generally speaking, the trade-off in making the move to a more expensive city may only be worth it once you've come close to hitting the career ceiling after advancing in a less expensive city.
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Old 10-27-2018, 11:47 AM
 
3,747 posts, read 2,141,085 times
Reputation: 4334
I would actually like to live in a smaller, less populated area. There's just a personal infrastructure problem. Smaller, less populated areas do not have present what I need to achieve what I need to achieve.

The type of work that I do is typically concentrated in metropolitan areas of over 1 million plus people and possibly more. I'm in Dallas, Texas. The Dallas-Fort Worth metropolitan area has over 7 million. Dallas County (the city of Dallas and some aging, inner ring suburbs) has a population of 2.6 million. I could get work in more populated areas than Dallas. I probably could get work in a mid-sized area, but I'm not willing to take that chance.

Then, there's dating. I'm a never married male over 30. I need to date and have relationships. Places with less than 100,000 population do not have a broad base of singles for me to achieve that. Some of the mid-sized metro areas (100,000 to 1 million) have more of a base of singles. In certain ways, dating in midsized metros is better than dating in highly populated areas like Dallas, but in some mid-sized metros, the dating pool might be questionable for a variety of reasons. That's something that a person has to evaluate on a case by case basis.

While Dallas is far from perfect, Dallas represents the city/metro area that gives the best chance to date/have relationships and have a career with the lowest costs of living. That's why I'm here.
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Old 10-27-2018, 11:58 AM
 
13,248 posts, read 17,784,157 times
Reputation: 19918
Quote:
Originally Posted by Berteau View Post
True. My perspective is from people who relocate for careers. Joe the plumber is probably better off in a smaller city as far as cost of living. Itís just that people who make the cost of living comments from smaller cities donít understand the higher pay and opportunities for people with careers looking to climb the ladder.
A good Joe the Plumber makes as much as medium management IT.
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Old 10-27-2018, 12:00 PM
 
13,248 posts, read 17,784,157 times
Reputation: 19918
Quote:
Originally Posted by Matt Marcinkiewicz View Post
Damn. CA small town life isn't really applicable to small town life in other parts of the country, to be fair, but I'm still kind of surprised it's that expensive.
Come to small town OK. I went through sticker shock when it ended up being the same as DFW.
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Old 10-27-2018, 12:32 PM
 
4,665 posts, read 2,641,137 times
Reputation: 3342
There is not always a correlation between COL and wages. It does not scale perfectly.

One of the biggest COL expenses is where one lives, for most people this ranges from 15%-30% of the budget. Some cities make it difficult and more expensive to build new homes, and that creates a more expensive real estate market (assuming there is demand). That will effect wages some, but what it will do is increase COL relative to overall wages. We saw this during the oil shale boom in N Dakota and its been happening in Portland, Oregon. COL is outpacing wage increases.

One cant assume a big city with high COL will automatically have high wages and one cant assume a town with low COL will have low wages. It varies, greatly, even within a single metro it will vary, let alone the whole country.
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Old 10-27-2018, 02:32 PM
 
Location: Erie, PA
2,865 posts, read 1,259,798 times
Reputation: 6454
Quote:
Originally Posted by NDak15 View Post
Cost of living and salary trump everything when it comes to relocating in my opinion. If I can't afford to do more than pay for food clothing (or worse not pay for that even) then I won't move there.
^^^^^

I agree. I honestly feel sorry for people who live in the larger cities and pay $4K a month for a closet to live in and have to watch every penny.

I could live in a large metro but love everything about the area I live in.

Almost 4K square foot house for a dream price, a lot of disposable income, lots of space, and greenery. And of course I can buy more than food and clothing, lol. A Great Lake almost in my back yard !

COL and QOL definitely factored in for me North Dakota seems like a nice place to live, too based on what I hear about it from people I know who have moved there.
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Old 10-28-2018, 02:45 AM
 
Location: SoCal
3,770 posts, read 2,560,131 times
Reputation: 2982
I can attest to this I moved within the last year from a very small very cheap town to LA, and with the move my salary doubled, and overall my expenses decreased because i'm a very adventurous individual every weekend I go on adventures exploring different areas. Where I used to live I used to have to drive so far to do this, but now I don't have to go far living in a very interesting mentally satisfying place.
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