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Old 10-31-2018, 01:49 PM
 
Location: Calera, AL
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Canadian English is unique in that it's heavily influenced by both British and American English, so your typical Canadian could probably find equal enjoyment in both an American sitcom and a BBC Britcom, while an American might find British TV strange, and vice versa.


Canadian French, on the other hand, is a whole different animal.
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Old 10-31-2018, 01:53 PM
 
Location: Gatineau, Québec
21,937 posts, read 27,326,583 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by fezzador View Post
Shhhedule, recORD, etc. are pretty dead giveaways too.
Relatively few Canadians say ''shed-djul" these days. It's overwhelmingly "sked-djul".


I believe there are a number of British-influenced pronunciations that were more common even not that long ago that have faded away.


"Stew-pid" used to rival "stoo-pid" but no longer.


Same goes with "de(h)-pot" vs. "dee-pot". Though the RCMP academy in Regina is still referred to as "de(h)-pot division".
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Old 10-31-2018, 02:16 PM
 
Location: Gatineau, Québec
21,937 posts, read 27,326,583 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Natnasci View Post
When I travel in the states, I'm spotted as Canadian and it's not just the accent, it words that we use, like washroom, garburator, referring to grade one instead of first grade, Second World War instead of World War 2 etc and many others that most Canadians don't even realize are said differently in the US.

Some words that we say differently, but there are variations since Canada is massive.

Processed
Pasta
Drama
Mum. Even Canadians who may spell it MOM, say MUM, not MAWM.
Produce
Roof
Vase although some Canadian may pronounce it the American way.
Lever. Most Canadians say Lee-ver, as opposed to LEV-ers.
Permit as in a city permit.
Foyer

...tons of others.
These are all good examples of the uniqueness of Canadian English.


I don't think that beyond the border regions, most people stateside would pick up on these as being Canadian unless they've had some measure of exposure to Canadians for whatever reason.


They probably just think you "talk funny"!
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Old 10-31-2018, 02:19 PM
 
Location: Vancouver
12,672 posts, read 8,740,385 times
Reputation: 7281
Quote:
Originally Posted by Acajack View Post
These are all good examples of the uniqueness of Canadian English.


I don't think that beyond the border regions, most people stateside would pick up on these as being Canadian unless they've had some measure of exposure to Canadians for whatever reason.


They probably just think you "talk funny"!
Some, but you would be surprised at how many people do. Millions of Californians have been to BC for example.

In places like Nebraska, Ohio, Arkansas, probably not so much.
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Old 10-31-2018, 04:47 PM
 
Location: Metrowest Boston
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Well, I'm Canadian, but I've lived in the US for a little under a decade. The Canadian accent is pretty recognizable to most people that I've met. I don't really have one since my dad is from GA, and my mom is from NY, but my wife does. It's always one of these:

Sorry - Sore-y
About - Abou-T
House - Houce
Process - Pro-cess
Can't / Won't / Heat (or anything else ending in a hard "T" sound) - Ontario
Ham / Can / Van (Anything with an short A sound, and then an N or M) - Western Canada
***** - Hoore - Northern Ontario
French accent
"The states" / "over the river" - Most Canadians, with the later being Southern Ontario
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Old 10-31-2018, 06:11 PM
 
Location: East of the Sun, West of the Moon
15,504 posts, read 17,724,856 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Natnasci View Post
When I travel in the states, I'm spotted as Canadian and it's not just the accent, it words that we use, like washroom, garburator, referring to grade one instead of first grade, Second World War instead of World War 2 etc and many others that most Canadians don't even realize are said differently in the US.

Some words that we say differently, but there are variations since Canada is massive.

Processed
Pasta
Drama
Mum. Even Canadians who may spell it MOM, say MUM, not MAWM.
Produce
Roof
Vase although some Canadian may pronounce it the American way.
Lever. Most Canadians say Lee-ver, as opposed to LEV-ers.
Permit as in a city permit.
Foyer

...tons of others.
Some of these are spoken in the US the same way as Canada, for example, there are at least two ways Americans pronounce 'vase' (vace, vahz), 'roof' (roof, ruuhf), 'pasta' (pahsta, paaasta), and 'foyer' (foyur, foyay). In some places you will still hear older people using alternate pronunciations of 'lever' (levur, leevur) as well.

But a few are definitely very rare in not absent in the US, such as 'process' and 'schedule' which are usually dead giveaways.
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Old 11-01-2018, 11:25 AM
 
904 posts, read 911,862 times
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All the Canadians I've went to school with, I have been able to detect accents.
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Old 11-01-2018, 11:57 AM
 
Location: STL area
990 posts, read 498,304 times
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I married a Canadian and I can usually pick up the subtle differences in speech...the accent, some different terms, etc.
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Old 11-01-2018, 12:15 PM
 
Location: Vancouver
12,672 posts, read 8,740,385 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ABQConvict View Post
Some of these are spoken in the US the same way as Canada, for example, there are at least two ways Americans pronounce 'vase' (vace, vahz), 'roof' (roof, ruuhf), 'pasta' (pahsta, paaasta), and 'foyer' (foyur, foyay). In some places you will still hear older people using alternate pronunciations of 'lever' (levur, leevur) as well.

But a few are definitely very rare in not absent in the US, such as 'process' and 'schedule' which are usually dead giveaways.
I mentioned that there were variations in Canada, and should have added in the US as well. However, I think it's safe to say, that the majority of people in the US do not pronounce most of these words the same as the majority in Canada.
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Old 11-01-2018, 08:26 PM
 
5,858 posts, read 14,044,713 times
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When I was a kid in Western NY, there were 3 Canadian brothers who lived on our block. We'd play "hahkee" (as we pronounced it) with them. They claimed they were playing "hawkee". They also pronounced dog as "dahhg". (We said "dawg".)
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