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Old 11-01-2018, 08:29 PM
 
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[quote=
Mum. Even Canadians who may spell it MOM, say MUM, not MAWM.
[/QUOTE]

I think just Californians and Sarah Palen pronounce it "Mawm".

And that reminds me, another Canadian pronunciation is to pronounce dollar as "dawler".
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Old 11-01-2018, 09:04 PM
 
Location: Silicon Valley
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I grew up in CA, but also lived in WA right on the border and went into Canada (BC) very regularly, and have friends from Canada. I can always hear the accent.

As others have said, there are just so many expressions that are Canadian/British that a Canadian will use that Americans don't, even if most of the words used sound the same.

Along with other examples already mentioned - Canadians go "on holiday." Americans go "on a vacation."

Canadians also leave out the article in sentences like "he went to hospital" instead of "he went to the hospital" - or "He's in hospital" instead of "he's in the hospital."

Canadians, even if they don't use the expression "eh" at the end of a sentence, still often phrase a sentence like it's a question, with the up-tilt at the end of the sentence - even if it's not a question. Or, they'll say something like "yeah?" Or "you know?"

Like:

"Where's John?"

"He's at the store. We needed some more beer, yeah?"

And a Canadian who is listening to you tell a story, will say things like, "Oh yeah?" while listening - again, with the sound of a question. Whereas most Americans would make a statement instead - like ' You're kidding!" Or "huh!" More like an emphatic statement than a soft question.

The American accent that I know of that sounds the most like the Canadians I've heard, at least from BC and Alberta, is the Minnesota accent. It has that Swedish type of sound, where they also use the question sound at the end of sentences and use that - "oh yah?" while listening to you talk. They also say a-boat, etc.

Last edited by NoMoreSnowForMe; 11-01-2018 at 09:13 PM..
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Old 11-01-2018, 09:10 PM
 
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Canadians don't call feather Indians the same as dot Indians. They prefer first nation instead, the rest are called second nation, except the Irish, they are 3rd nation
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Old 11-01-2018, 09:28 PM
 
Location: too far from the sea
19,824 posts, read 18,826,487 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Natnasci View Post
When I travel in the states, I'm spotted as Canadian and it's not just the accent, it words that we use, like washroom, garburator, referring to grade one instead of first grade, Second World War instead of World War 2 etc and many others that most Canadians don't even realize are said differently in the US.

Some words that we say differently, but there are variations since Canada is massive.

Processed
Pasta
Drama
Mum. Even Canadians who may spell it MOM, say MUM, not MAWM.
Produce
Roof
Vase although some Canadian may pronounce it the American way.
Lever. Most Canadians say Lee-ver, as opposed to LEV-ers.
Permit as in a city permit.
Foyer

...tons of others.
I'm only familiar with the accents of Canadians who live directly to the north of me, eastern Canada. You can tell because of the usual: aboot, hooose, eh.

I was wondering though, on that list, How else could you say produce? If you mean vegetables, it's pronounced one way and if you're using it as a verb, it's another way. PROduce and proDUCE. Long O in PROduce. Hardly any O sound in proDUCE--more like preDUCE.

Roof. Do Canadians say ruff?

Permit. A city PERmit. As a verb, we say perMIT.

Just wondering. I pretty much agree with the rest.
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Old 11-01-2018, 11:27 PM
 
Location: Vancouver
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Quote:
Originally Posted by in_newengland View Post
I'm only familiar with the accents of Canadians who live directly to the north of me, eastern Canada. You can tell because of the usual: aboot, hooose, eh.

I was wondering though, on that list, How else could you say produce? If you mean vegetables, it's pronounced one way and if you're using it as a verb, it's another way. PROduce and proDUCE. Long O in PROduce. Hardly any O sound in proDUCE--more like preDUCE.

Roof. Do Canadians say ruff?

Permit. A city PERmit. As a verb, we say perMIT.

Just wondering. I pretty much agree with the rest.
Processed as in cheese, and produce as in vegetables are usually said the same way, PROduce. Not everyone, but the majority. I find people in Ontario are more likely to use PRAWDUCE, not the majority, but if you hear it, it's usually someone from Ontario.

I only heard a few Canadians say ruff..again Ontario. If someone here would say that it stands out as weird.

Permit, whether a city permit of the verb is said the same way. PERmit sounds very southern US to my ears.

According to a friend from California, it sounded very odd to hear me say " I'm a bit peckish ". British origins of course, but no one in Canada would think anything of someone saying that. So I believe we still retain in English speaking Canada a lot of older phrases and terms that many Canadians don't think twice about. So you have people claiming that it's only a few words and phrases that differ from US english...when actually, it's a bit more than that.

It's similar to people claiming the cultures are the same, or almost the same...not true. Are there a lot of commonalities, yes, do Canadians absorb and enjoy many aspect of US culture, yes...but it's mainly entertainment and pop culture like a lot of the world. The bones are a different beast.
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Old 11-02-2018, 08:50 PM
 
Location: East of the Sun, West of the Moon
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Natnasci View Post

Permit, whether a city permit of the verb is said the same way. PERmit sounds very southern US to my ears.

According to a friend from California, it sounded very odd to hear me say " I'm a bit peckish ". British origins of course, but no one in Canada would think anything of someone saying that.
PERmit/perMIT is definitely a pretty universal difference.

'Peckish', on the other hand, doesn't sound strange to my ear at all. I hear it and use it. Not as frequently as 'hungry' by a longshot, though.

Then again you were talking to a Californian and they say 'hella' which sounds 'hella' strange to me!
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Old 11-03-2018, 01:16 AM
 
Location: Vancouver
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ABQConvict View Post
PERmit/perMIT is definitely a pretty universal difference.

'Peckish', on the other hand, doesn't sound strange to my ear at all. I hear it and use it. Not as frequently as 'hungry' by a longshot, though.

Then again you were talking to a Californian and they say 'hella' which sounds 'hella' strange to me!
Not in Canada.
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Old 11-03-2018, 03:03 AM
 
Location: South Austin, 78745
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Very interesting topic. It got me to thinking and wondering.

I think most white Americans are unable to tell a Canadian from another white American based solely on their accents - or their looks, for that matter.

I think most American accents from all regions of the Lower 48 States - excluding the South - talk and sound like they could be from Canada rather than the American South. Most people from say, Omaha and San Diego talk with an "accent" that sounds more like they could be from, say, Regina, Saskatchewan or Vancouver, British Colombia than being from, say, Colombia, South Carolina or Montgomery, Alabama.

I think the accents of Australians, Englanders and white South Africans sound very simular to another and all 3 sound nothing at all like Canadians and Americans.

I wonder if Englanders, Australians and white South Africans are able to tell a difference between Canadians, Southern Americans, and non-Southern Americans based on their accent?

I wonder if English speaking Canadians have different accents in each regions of Canada and, if they do have different accents, are most Americans able tell a differece in the Canadian accents when they speak.

Last edited by Ivory Lee Spurlock; 11-03-2018 at 03:13 AM..
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Old 11-03-2018, 08:56 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ivory Lee Spurlock View Post
Very interesting topic. It got me to thinking and wondering.

I think most white Americans are unable to tell a Canadian from another white American based solely on their accents - or their looks, for that matter.

I think most American accents from all regions of the Lower 48 States - excluding the South - talk and sound like they could be from Canada rather than the American South. Most people from say, Omaha and San Diego talk with an "accent" that sounds more like they could be from, say, Regina, Saskatchewan or Vancouver, British Colombia than being from, say, Colombia, South Carolina or Montgomery, Alabama.

I think the accents of Australians, Englanders and white South Africans sound very similar to another and all 3 sound nothing at all like Canadians and Americans.

I wonder if Englanders, Australians and white South Africans are able to tell a difference between Canadians, Southern Americans, and non-Southern Americans based on their accent?

I wonder if English speaking Canadians have different accents in each regions of Canada and, if they do have different accents, are most Americans able tell a difference in the Canadian accents when they speak.
Where to start. Yes, Canada has regional accents. No, as a whole they do not sound as much like Californians as many of them claim to. But you have to listen carefully and pay attention to pick up on the differences; they are not always immediately obvious as soon as the person opens his mouth.

There are also many more accents in the US than "General American" and "Southern." Some of the differences are subtle and again, require paying attention. In particular, people do unusual things with vowels in various areas.

Most Americans, and Canadians too, are not very skilled at pinpointing regional accents from pronunciation alone. If you include regional vocabulary, it gets a little easier, but if, say, people from a variety of areas are all reading the same script, most people won't notice that one of them exhibits Canadian raising or California vowel shift or the caught/cot distinction, among others, because they are focused on meaning, and none of these minor variations affects communication.

The English, Australians, and South Africans do not sound all that similar. What they do all sound is very different from Americans/Canadians. Someone familiar with each accent can easily tell them apart.

And, it can be assumed that people from the UK, Australia, and South Africa are not especially skilled at categorizing regional differences in American/Canadian English. How could they be?
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Old 11-03-2018, 10:15 AM
 
Location: East of the Sun, West of the Moon
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Natnasci View Post
Not in Canada.
That what I mean, it is a pretty universal difference in pronunciation between US and Canada.
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