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Old 03-01-2019, 01:24 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ivory Lee Spurlock View Post
Very interesting topic. It got me to thinking and wondering.

I think most white Americans are unable to tell a Canadian from another white American based solely on their accents - or their looks, for that matter.

I think most American accents from all regions of the Lower 48 States - excluding the South - talk and sound like they could be from Canada rather than the American South. Most people from say, Omaha and San Diego talk with an "accent" that sounds more like they could be from, say, Regina, Saskatchewan or Vancouver, British Colombia than being from, say, Colombia, South Carolina or Montgomery, Alabama.

I think the accents of Australians, Englanders and white South Africans sound very simular to another and all 3 sound nothing at all like Canadians and Americans.

I wonder if Englanders, Australians and white South Africans are able to tell a difference between Canadians, Southern Americans, and non-Southern Americans based on their accent?

I wonder if English speaking Canadians have different accents in each regions of Canada and, if they do have different accents, are most Americans able tell a differece in the Canadian accents when they speak.
Clearly you have never heard a New Yawka (New Yawk City) … definitely don't sound like we're from Canada, lmao
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Old 03-01-2019, 02:23 PM
 
Location: Appalachian New York, Formerly Louisiana
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Snakeskinn View Post
Most of us Canadians here in Toronto consider our selves to speak like Californians. Are we wrong?
Yes.

You do, however, sound like lower Michiganders, west-central upstate New Yorkers, and far northern Ohioans.

Not Cali though.

The most famous Canadian accent that most Americans apply across provinces comes from the Maritimes. Nova Scotia and New Brunswick in particular.

Even though Albertans sound distinct from it, a lot of Americans will still assume to hear a Maritime accent.

But don't feel bad, most Americans are not even aware of how many accents there are in our own country.
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Old 03-01-2019, 02:30 PM
 
Location: Appalachian New York, Formerly Louisiana
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ivory Lee Spurlock View Post
I think most American accents from all regions of the Lower 48 States - excluding the South - talk and sound like they could be from Canada
I strongly disagree with saying most. The accents found in NYC, Boston and lower New England, Baltimore, Chicago, northern West Virginia, Western and lower PA, and the lower Midwest (Cincinnati, Evansville, St. Louis, etc.), and several parts of the western US, are nowhere near anything in Canada.

There are definitely some American accents that could be right at home in parts of Canada, but certainly not most.
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Old 03-01-2019, 03:34 PM
 
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I can definitely tell quebecois apart. Does that count?
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Old 03-01-2019, 07:20 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Natnasci View Post
I mentioned that there were variations in Canada, and should have added in the US as well. However, I think it's safe to say, that the majority of people in the US do not pronounce most of these words the same as the majority in Canada.
But the bottom line is, the regional accents within the US are far more different than the US vs. Ontario or BC accent. Seattle is far more similar in accent to Vancouver BC than Seattle is to New York or Arkansas.
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Old 03-01-2019, 07:39 PM
 
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Originally Posted by krosser100 View Post

Also Canadians pronounce "T" sharply whereas Americans often drop the "T" in words like cenTer, renTal

Canadians often make a statement but sounds like a question (not to the extent as Australians though) a lilt in speech.


Native Californian here. I pronounce the T sharply, all the time.

As for Canadians making a statement sound like a question with the lilt, Californians do it too.

And I have listened to countless Canadians from Ontario and BC say about and not once did I hear them say aboot or aboat.
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Old 03-01-2019, 10:55 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MrJester View Post
Native Californian here. I pronounce the T sharply, all the time.

As for Canadians making a statement sound like a question with the lilt, Californians do it too.

And I have listened to countless Canadians from Ontario and BC say about and not once did I hear them say aboot or aboat.
That bolded here shows that your ears are not attuned to linguistic differences.

I'm Californian and yes Canadian speech style is not extremely different (I have visited Can many times & have relatives there) from Cali but it is different, the cadence is different, the pronunciation of words with vowels (there are many) are different. But one has to be attuned to the differences, but you are not, if you don't think Canadians pronounce "about" differently.

Racial differences. You are Asian right? I am too, I can assure you American-born Asians from California have a notably different accent from Canadian-born Asians.
I have cousins in Canada who said Asians in California "Sound ghetto" to their ears. I myself don't think so (sounding ghetto), but I do know what "they mean" and I agree there is a difference.
Not as different as between Black Canadians and African-Americans, of course though.
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Old 03-01-2019, 11:04 PM
 
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Yes, by the accent.

And they live quite a bit longer on average (see healthcare debate). https://www.statista.com/statistics/...north-america/
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Old 03-01-2019, 11:05 PM
 
Location: Appalachian New York, Formerly Louisiana
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MrJester View Post
And I have listened to countless Canadians from Ontario and BC say about and not once did I hear them say aboot or aboat.
That's because Aboot is a Maritime thing (see New Brunswick), and Aboat I am surprised you haven't heard from some Ontarioans, as that is common even in upstate NY.
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Old 03-01-2019, 11:06 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by krosser100 View Post
That bolded here shows that your ears are not attuned to linguistic differences.

I'm Californian and yes Canadian speech style is not extremely different (I have visited Can many times & have relatives there) from Cali but it is different, the cadence is different, the pronunciation of words with vowels (there are many) are different. But one has to be attuned to the differences, but you are not, if you don't think Canadians pronounce "about" differently.

Racial differences. You are Asian right? I am too, I can assure you American-born Asians from California have a notably different accent from Canadian-born Asians. Not as different as between Black Canadians and African-Americans, of course though.
Is this a joke alluding to all English words have vowels or was some part missing?

Also Asian in DFW, I met several other Korean Americans who grew up in Alberta, Vancouver, and the Toronto area. Ranging from people who moved to the US at 7 years of ago to the low 30s. Aside from vocabulary differences, such as y'all, I don't think any of them speak very differently than the natives or domestic migrants to the region. Or, at least, not any more distinctively.
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